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How Much Humiliation Can Andrew Scheer Take?   

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When I saw how the Cons were portraying Andrew Scheer as the winner of Wednesday night's French language debate, I was astounded.

For I speak French fluently, and I didn't have the slightest doubt that he was the big loser.

And sure enough the Quebec media has now delivered its unanimous verdict.

And Scheer has been humiliated.
Read more »

          

Thoughts, prayers and action (Part 1)   

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Representatives of eight faith communities gathered with environmentalists and others on Wednesday at the Chapel + Cultural Center at RPI to mark the Season of Creation with prayers, scripture readings and a call to action on behalf of the environment. The Season of Creation spans five weeks between the World Day of Prayer for the

          

Whistleblower: Officials Told To 'Lock Down' All Records Of Ukraine Call   

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Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET A government whistleblower received information from "multiple" officials that President Trump "is using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 U.S. election." An unclassified version of the whistleblower's complaint , made public Thursday by the House intelligence committee, says that the president's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, "is a central figure in this effort. Attorney General [William] Barr appears to be as well." The complaint centers on Trump's July 25 call with the president of Ukraine, an account of which was released Wednesday by the White House. That memorandum shows Trump asking the Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy for "a favor" — to investigate potential 2020 rival former Vice President Joe Biden. What the complaint released Thursday further reveals is that the whistleblower was told by officials that the record of the call was handled differently than other such transcripts. It was placed in an

          

New Trump Policy Would Permit Indefinite Detention Of Migrant Families, Children   

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Updated at 3:34 p.m. ET The Trump administration has announced it is ending a federal court agreement that limits how long migrant families with children can be detained. Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan outlined the new policy Wednesday, which replaces the Flores settlement agreement . That's been a longtime target of immigration hard-liners in the Trump administration, who contend the settlement has acted as a lure to families in Central America. The new policy means that migrant families who are detained after crossing the border can be kept indefinitely, until their cases are decided. Today's policy doesn't specify a limit but sets an expectation that cases be resolved comparatively quickly — within about two months. Asked about the new policy, President Trump told reporters on Wednesday that "very much I have the children on my mind. It bothers me very greatly." He added that the new policy, along with upgrades to border barriers, will mean migrant families won't

          

Heavy Rains and Floods Leave Hundred's Without Power   

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Heavy rain and high winds Tuesday night and Wednesday morning knocked down power lines and caused flooding for hundreds of residents in West Michigan. Continue reading…

          

Whistleblower’s attorney says team now representing ‘multiple’ officials   

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WASHINGTON – An attorney for the whistleblower who sounded the alarm about President Donald Trump’s pressure on Ukraine said Sunday that “multiple” whistleblowers have come forward, deepening a political quagmire that has engulfed the president as well as several of his Cabinet members.

The news comes as House Democrats are accelerating their impeachment inquiry and subpoenaing documents related to Trump’s efforts to push foreign countries to investigate one of his political opponents, former vice president Joe Biden.

“I can confirm that my firm and my team represent multiple whistleblowers in connection to the underlying August 12, 2019, disclosure to the Intelligence Community Inspector General,” the whistleblower’s attorney, Andrew Bakaj, said in a tweet. “No further comment at this time.”

Mark Zaid, who also is a member of the original whistleblower’s legal team, confirmed to the Washington Post that the team is now representing a second whistleblower, someone who works in the intelligence community. The second individual has spoken to the inspector general of the intelligence community and has not filed a complaint.

“Doesn’t need to,” Zaid said in a text message, adding that the person has “first hand knowledge that supported the first whistleblower.”

News that the original whistleblower’s team is representing a second person was first reported Sunday by ABC News.

Trump seized on the latest development in a Sunday night tweet.

“Democrat lawyer is same for both Whistleblowers? All support Obama and Crooked Hillary. Witch Hunt!” he said.

The crisis, which began last month with media reports revealing the original whistleblower’s complaint, has quickly metastasized across the Trump administration, ensnaring senior officials such as Energy Secretary Rick Perry and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who came under further scrutiny over the weekend.

Trump largely stayed out of public view, spending Saturday at his golf club in Sterling, Virginia, and Sunday at the White House. In tweets, he attacked Democrats and some Republican detractors, including Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah, whose ouster he demanded Saturday after Romney criticized him.

He also appeared to directly link the 2020 presidential race to his efforts to push Ukraine to investigate Biden, contrary to a tweet on Friday declaring that “this has NOTHING to do with politics or a political campaign against the Bidens.”

“And by the way, I would LOVE running against 1% Joe Biden – I just don’t think it’s going to happen,” Trump tweeted Sunday, arguing that Biden and his family were “PAID OFF, pure and simple!”

“Sleepy Joe won’t get to the starting gate, & based on all of the money he & his family probably ‘extorted,’ Joe should hang it up,” Trump added. “I wouldn’t want him dealing with China & [Ukraine]!”

Biden campaign spokesman Andrew Bates responded by calling it “puzzling” that Trump would claim to love the prospect of a matchup against Biden, “seeing as how he just sent his administration into a tailspin by trying to bully a foreign country into spreading a comprehensively debunked conspiracy theory about the vice president.”

Biden’s son Hunter served for nearly five years on the board of Burisma, Ukraine’s largest private gas company, whose owner came under scrutiny by Ukrainian prosecutors for possible abuse of power and unlawful enrichment. Hunter Biden was not accused of any wrongdoing in the investigation.

As vice president, Joe Biden pressured Ukraine to fire the top prosecutor, Viktor Shokin, whom Biden and other Western officials, including Republicans, accused of not sufficiently pursuing corruption cases. At the time, the investigation into Burisma was dormant, according to former Ukrainian and U.S. officials.

On Saturday, Perry’s discussions with Ukrainian officials came to attention amid reports that Trump told Republicans on Friday that he made the July 25 call with the Ukrainian president at the request of Perry.

Asked about Trump’s comments, which were first reported by Axios, Energy Department spokeswoman Shylyn Hynes said in an email that Perry encouraged Trump to speak with Ukrainian President Volodymr Zelensky to discuss energy security.

Pompeo, who was scheduled to return to Washington on Sunday, is facing growing pressure from Democrats seeking Ukraine-related documents.

House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., said Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation” that Pompeo, who had spent much of the past week in Europe, missed a Friday deadline to comply with a subpoena for information about the State Department’s dealings with Ukraine. Pompeo asserts that a letter sent to the committee constitutes the department’s initial response.

The whistleblower complaint accused Trump of asking the Ukrainian government to help him with his reelection bid by launching an investigation into Biden. Democrats are also probing whether Trump’s decision to withhold nearly $400 million in military assistance from Ukraine was linked to his push for the government there to pursue political investigations that could bolster the president’s reelection bid.

Text messages between State Department officials, revealed by House Democrats last week, show that there was at least some concern that Trump was pursuing an improper quid pro quo.

“As I said on the phone, I think it’s crazy to withhold security assistance for help with a political campaign,” diplomat William Taylor wrote on Sept. 9 to Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union.

Sondland, who has denied that Trump sought a quid pro quo, has agreed to meet privately on Tuesday with the three House panels – Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight – spearheading the probe, according to a committee aide.

On Friday, those three committees subpoenaed the White House for documents and wrote a letter to Vice President Mike Pence demanding that he turn over documents related to his talks with Zelensky.

Speaking at a Republican event in Louisiana on Saturday, Pence criticized Democrats but gave no indication about whether he would comply with their document request.

“Do-Nothing Democrats launched a partisan impeachment inquiry in a blatant attempt to overturn the will of the American people in the last election,” he said.

On Sunday, Trump’s campaign announced that the president would be traveling to Lake Charles, Louisiana, to hold a rally on Friday. The president will also have a rally on Wednesday in Minneapolis.

No White House officials made appearances on the Sunday morning news shows, leaving it up to congressional Republicans and Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani to defend the president in heated interviews during which they offered at-times-contradictory explanations for the president’s actions.

In a combative exchange on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” host Chuck Todd urged Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., to explain why he told the Wall Street Journal about his concern in the summer that Trump had sought to link Ukrainian military aid to an investigation of the Bidens.

Johnson repeatedly declined to answer, instead raising a conspiracy theory and criticizing the media before finally stating that Trump had “adamantly denied” any quid pro quo.

Johnson also at one point said he does not trust U.S. intelligence agencies. “Something pretty fishy happened during the 2016 campaign and in the transition, the early part of the Trump presidency, and we still don’t know,” he said.

“We do know the answer,” an exasperated Todd responded, adding: “You’re making a choice not to believe the investigations that have taken place.”

Giuliani issued a defiant defense of Trump in an interview on Fox News Channel’s “MediaBuzz” in which he argued that the president “has every right to ask countries to help us in a criminal investigation that should be undertaken.”

Giuliani was named in the whistleblower’s complaint and in a rough transcript of Trump’s phone call with Zelensky as being a key intermediary in back-channel efforts to pursue the allegations against Biden.

But other Republicans sought to play down Trump’s comments, including his exchange with reporters outside the White House on Thursday in which he urged China to investigate Biden.

In an interview on ABC News’s “This Week,” Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, echoed a suggestion on Friday by Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., that Trump’s China statement was not “a real request.”

“George, you really think he was serious about thinking that China’s going to investigate the Biden family? … I think he’s getting the press all spun up about this,” Jordan told host George Stephanopoulos.

During the interview, Stephanopoulos repeatedly sought an answer from Jordan on whether he thinks it is appropriate for Trump to ask China and Ukraine to investigate Biden. Jordan dodged the question more than a dozen times.

Democrats on Sunday defended their party’s efforts to pursue an impeachment inquiry.

In an interview on “Fox News Sunday,” Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., a member of the Intelligence Committee, supported Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s view that no vote by the full House is necessary for an impeachment inquiry to move forward.

She added that she thinks the House “will have to take a serious look at articles of impeachment” based on the evidence that has emerged.

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, N.Y., a key member of House Democratic leadership, said on “This Week” that “the evidence of wrongdoing by Donald Trump is hiding in plain sight.”

“The administration, without justification, withheld $391 million in military aid from a vulnerable Ukraine,” he said. “The president then pressured a foreign leader to interfere in the 2020 elections and target an American citizen for political gain. That is textbook abuse of power.”


          

Amazon Announcement Day 2019: maybe the best ever (Part 1: the wearables)   

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Amazon Announcement Day 2019: maybe the best ever (Part 1: the wearables) I’m not saying that the products and features announced Wednesday were necessarily the best ever (it’s hard to overstate the importance of Apple’s iPhone introduction), but in terms of entertainment value, I’d be hard-pressed to come up with a event like this that […]

          

Alaska Air and American to Dissolve Frequent-Flyer Program Partnership   

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Much of the partnership between Alaska Airlines and American Airlines will be dismantled come spring. Alaska Airlines announced on Wednesday that members of its Mileage Plan frequent-flyer plan will no longer earn miles on American Airlines international flights and will no longer be able to redeem miles for award travel on any American flights. The change will go into effect on March 1, 2020. What will remain after that date will be a ...

          

Last Week’s Local Arrests Include Two People In One Car Combining For 66 Jail Visits   

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A Bryan police officer making a traffic stop last Wednesday night leads to the arrest of a local man and woman who have a combined 66 visits to the Brazos County jail. 63 year old Morris Britton of Bryan was arrested on a charge of driving with an invalid license with three prior convictions. According […]

          

Texier scores in OT, Blue Jackets beat Sabres 4-3   

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Rookie Alexandre Texier scored 2:08 into overtime to lift the Columbus Blue Jackets to a 4-3 win over the Buffalo Sabres on Monday night.

Texier beat Linus Ullmark from the right circle off a quick pass from Nick Foligno to give the Blue Jackets their first win of the season.

Victor Olofsson scored for the Sabres, who had pulled the goalie on the power play to create a 6-on-4 advantage, with 1:14 left in the game to tie the score and force the extra period.

Foligno, Oliver Bjorkstrand and Cam Atkinson also scored for the Blue Jackets, who had dropped their first two games of the season by a combined 10-3 score. They outshot Buffalo 44-18.

Joonas Korpisalo had 15 saves for Columbus.

Marcus Johansson and Jeff Skinner also scored for Buffalo and Ullmark, making his first start of the season, had 40 saves.

Bjorkstrand, playing in his 200th NHL game, got his first goal of the season with 1:51 left in the first when he grabbed a carom off the back boards and shot from a sharp angle, bouncing the puck in off Ullmark's back.

The Blue Jackets struck again quickly when Atkinson — just 9 seconds into a power play — scored from the bottom of the right circle off a sharp behind-the-net feed from Alexander Wennberg.

Early in the second period, it was Buffalo's turn to capitalize on a power play. Johansson, signed as an unrestricted free agent in the summer, got his first goal with the Sabres on a one-timer from the right circle to cut Columbus' lead to 2-1.

Skinner tied the score for Buffalo later in the second when he picked Ryan Murray's pocket in the defensive zone on the Blue Jackets' transition and rifled a shot past Korpisalo from 30 feet.

Foligno batted in a bouncing puck amid heavy traffic to give Columbus the lead again on a power play 6:46 into the third.

NOTES: Columbus F Sonny Milano replaced Josh Anderson, who was injured Saturday in a 7-2 loss to the Pittsburgh Penguins. ... Blue Jackets D Markus Nutivaara replaced Dean Kukan after being a healthy scratch Saturday. ... Columbus rookie F Emil Bemstrom got his first NHL point with an assist on Foligno's goal.

UP NEXT

Sabres: Host Montreal on Wednesday night.

Blue Jackets: Host Anaheim on Friday night.


          

Dozens report seeing large fireball over Ohio skies on Saturday   

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If you saw a fireball streak across the sky on Saturday evening you’re not alone.10TV received several reports from people in central Ohio who saw a bright meteor with a long trail across the sky.

The American Meteor Society says it received more than 130 reports about the fireball, seen over Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

It was likely a product of the South Taurid meteor shower.

The shower is caused by leftover debris from Comet Encke. It’s not very active, you’re lucky to see five to seven meteors an hour at its peak, but it is known to produce fireballs.

Those are very bright meteors and they’ve been known to leave long streaks across the sky with this shower.

South Taurid Meteor Shower

The shower itself peaks later this week - Wednesday night into Thursday morning - but has a large window of activity. It’s typically active from September 10th to November 20th.

This year’s peak coincides with a waxing gibbous moon which will wash out all but the brightest meteors. However, because it’s active for so long we’ll still have a shot at seeing fireballs through the month and into next month.


          

Dodgers’ bullpen falters, Nationals force NLDS to a Game 5 back in L.A.   

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Rich Hill lasted just 2-2/3 innings in his Game 4 start and the bullpen buckled behind him. Pedro Baez gave up a three-run home run to Ryan Zimmerman in a four-run fifth inning. Walker Buehler will face Stephen Strasburg in Game 5 on Wednesday evening.

          

5 great Gladys Knight and the Pips tracks   

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For any who do not know, Gladys Knight and the Pips is one of the great bands.  They started out in the 60s and had many huge hits.  Their biggest is "Midnight Train To Georgia."  I'm  not going to note that one tonight because everybody already knows it.

1) "Love Overboard"



One of the final great Gladys Knight and the Pips singles.  I love Gladys' deep notes on this song.

2) "Make Yours A Happy Home"



Of all their seventies charting hits, this is probably the least well known but to hear it even once, is to love it forever.

3) "Neither One Of Us"



The group spent some time at MOTOWN in the sixites.  They recorded many outstanding songs there but, for me, this is the best one of all.

4) "Landlord"



MOTOWN was where the group first recorded a song by Ashford & Simpson -- "Didn't You Know (You'd Have To Cry Sometime)."  Years later, 1980, they released their best album ALL LOVE which was written and produced by Ashford and Simpson.   "Landlord" is from that album.  You should also check out "Friendly Persuasion," "Add It Up," "Taste of Bitter Love" and "Bourgie, Bourgie" from that album (the last two were also hit singles).

5) "Love Is Fire (Love Is Ice)"

This is from 1987's ALL OUR LOVE.  "Love Overboard" is also from the same album.  That was the group's final studio album of contemporary music.  And this song, written by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager, is one of the best on the album.  Gladys' phrasing on this is especially haunting.



"Iraq snapshot" (THE COMMON ILLS):
Tuesday, October 1, 2019.  Protests in Iraq over corruption, in the US Joe Biden defenders continue attempting to defend and/or deny Joe's unethical conduct.

In Iraq today, a major protest.  In fact, another major protest.  It is at least the third major protest in the last seven days.  Last week, Lawk Ghafuri (RUDAW) reported:


Protestors demanding government action on postgraduate unemployment were hosed down with Iraqi security force water cannons on Wednesday, in an act condemned by a national human rights commission as an act “against freedom of expression.”
Iraqi master’s degree and PhD holders have been protesting outside ministry buildings in Baghdad since June, calling for measures to ease unemployment among postgraduates, including an increase in public sector jobs.

A video recorded by a protestor and published on social media on Wednesday shows water cannons being used to disperse protestors in front of the Council of Ministers in Baghdad.

Protestors, some of whom can be seen wearing graduation sashes, are knocked to the ground by the sheer force of the cannons. Other protestors rush to their aid.

“This is how Iraqi postgraduates are being treated in Iraq,” said the protestor recording events, who proceeds to call on Muqtada al-Sadr, the United Nations, the European Union and the entire world to come to their assistance.



Sunday, journalist Mustafa Habib reported:

Breaking: Big protests in against the decision to remove General Abdul Wahab al-Saadi. The Sunni city defending a Shiite officer from the south of the country. Remarkable
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0:08





Now, today, Mohammed Rwanduzy (RUDAW) reports:

Hundreds of Iraqis protested in Baghdad’s Tahrir Square on Tuesday to express diverse, long-brewing grievances, including, a lack of basic services, rampant corruption, and unequal treatment within the Iraqi Army. 
Civilian protestors expressed anger about the Friday dismissal of Iraqi Army commander Lt. Gen. Abdul Wahab al-Saadi, credited with the defeat of the Islamic State (ISIS) in Iraq, from the Iraqi Counter-Terrorism Services (ICTS).  Civilian protestors holding pictures of al-Saadi disapproved of his subsequent transfer to the Ministry of Defense.
“We don't want this is corrupt government,” civilians chanted, while others extended their discontent to the parliament and presidency. “All are corrupt equally,” a protestor said.

Mustafa Habib notes:

Breaking: All the world expected big protests in this summer, but did not happen because they want to give the govt a chance despite the continued poor services, but after the govt's decision to remove Saadi, the protests began today from & may be the biggest.
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Here are some more Tweets about the protest.

Protest against the government in Tahrir Square, Baghdad




Dozens of people gathered today morning in Tahrir Square in following calls on social media to protest against the government.




Hundreds of Iraqis protest in ’s Tahrir Square to express diverse, long-brewing grievances, including, a lack of basic services

Jean was taken to a nearby hospital where he died.

Three days after the shooting, Guyger was charged with manslaughter. By the end of the month, she was fired by Dallas PD. A grand jury would later ratchet up her charge to murder, for which Guyger stands to spend life in prison.

Jean's death sparked many protests and demonstrations in the weeks after the shooting. A few days after the shooting, dozens of protesters gathered outside Dallas Police headquarters and officers fired pepper balls into the crowd.

On September 12, a Dallas City Hall meeting was brought to a halt after protesters chanted, "No justice, no peace."

After the verdict, Crump said Jean was a "near perfect" person.

"This jury had to make history in America today, because Botham was the best that we had to offer," Crump said. "Twenty-six year old, college-educated black man, certified public accountant, working for one of the big three accounting firms in the world, PricewaterhouseCoopers."

"But it shouldn't take all of that for unarmed black and brown people in America to get justice," Crump said.


          

Dodgers’ bullpen falters, Nationals force NLDS to a Game 5 back in L.A.   

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Rich Hill lasted just 2-2/3 innings in his Game 4 start and the bullpen buckled behind him. Pedro Baez gave up a three-run home run to Ryan Zimmerman in a four-run fifth inning. Walker Buehler will face Stephen Strasburg in Game 5 on Wednesday evening.

          

Selena Gomez Goes For Biker Girl Chic in First Public Appearance in 4 Months   

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Selena GomezIs there anything that Selena Gomez doesn't look good in? The star brought out the leather on Wednesday for the L.A. screening Living Undocumented, the Netflix docuseries she...

          

Federal Election - Vote on campus today   

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All voters – students, faculty, staff and friends – regardless of where you live and which riding you plan to vote in are invited to vote in the federal election on campus on Tuesday October 8th and Wednesday October 9th.

Voting booths will be located on the 2nd floor (room 217) of Student Union Building (SUB) and open to voters from 10:00 am- 10:30 pm.

Whether you live in the Halifax riding, one of the surrounding ridings or consider your home to be elsewhere in the country, you can vote at the SUB for a candidate in any Canadian riding. You don't need to be pre-registered to vote, you can do this onsite.

Learn more about voting on campus and the ID needed to vote.


          

Consequences   

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I went out on Sunday with friends.... I know that sentence seems bizarre. It is something I haven't done in 12 years. On the surface it may appear to some that to attempt such a thing must mean that I am doing better. I mean I left the house and socialised for 6 hours. What they didn't see was the fact there were days of pacing so activity followed by rest periods. Massive amounts of ensuring I got my medications scheduled at the right time and attempting not to let my anxiety take over.

We planned going to the create and craft show back in July. As the ticket only cost £8, I was prepared to lose it if on the day I woke up and wasn't well enough to attend. It seemed so far off in the future the 29th September that it may as well been a year away. So when I realised it was the coming weekend it set me into a panic. My biggest fear was becoming ill away from home and then ruining the day for my friends.

The anxiety leading up to this event was off the chart. I lost a few nights sleep over it. I kept catastrophizing, what if's? The stupid thing is many of these what if's have never happened. It was a fear of the unknown, of never having been to a Create and Craft show or knowing how busy it would be.  Surprisingly the morning of the show the anxiety had subsided and I was able to look ahead to the day. I was almost relaxed which then made me anxious.

I had more medication on me than a pharmacy to cover me for every eventuality.  I had my 4 hourly meds - pyridostigmine and pseudoephedrine to ensure that my blood pressure remained high enough for me to remain vertical and not suffer horrendous fatigue. Extra pain relief in case sitting on my scooter for all that time caused muscle spasms or just pain. Stugeron in case my vertigo decided to kick off and cause me problems. Taken at the earliest opportunity it can stop an attack in its tracks. Buscopan, in case due to nerves my bowel adhesion pain decided to pop up and make itself known. Paracetamol - to give me extra back up for my pain relief. I decanted oramorph ( liquid morphine) into a smaller bottle so I didn't have to carry a huge one with me. Alarms were set on my phone, compression socks on, allergy lists, medication lists and medical condition lists were safely stowed in my bag. Along with a list of my doctors and next of kin. All this and I was only leaving the house for a few hours. If that all sounds like someone who is doing better let me know.

Every trick in my book was employed to ensure that I would be able to cope with this trip out ( as a one off ). Everything that could be done in advance of Sunday was done. Clothes for the day sorted by Wednesday, down to underwear and compression stockings. All clothes had to be comfortable, in layers so that I could be warm or cooler depending on how my temperature decided to behave on the day. Normally I am always cold. All medicines, allergy lists, medical info was printed out weeks in advance and kept in an envelope so on the day ( or day before ) it could just be slipped into my bag. My bag was packed on Friday and Saturday, last minute items Chilly bottles of drinks were added on Sunday morning. Nothing was left to chance. Every eventuality was planned for. Jay would be staying at home with Dembe and would be ready to come and get me should I need collecting early.

The day itself was fantastic, I managed to chat to lots of people. I met the ladies behind the scrap-busting quilt challenge from Sugar Bowl Crafts and bought half a metre of material from then, some Anna Maria Horner fabric. I chatted at length to the local branch of the Embroidery Guild and would have signed up to attend meetings had they not taken place on a Saturday. Not driving and having hubby work in retail meaning Saturdays off are like gold dust means I miss out on a lot of things. I also spent a great deal of time talking to the Quilters Guild  region 4 which is my region. I am now considering entering a quilt into the novice category of The Festival of Quilts as 2020 is the last year I would be able to enter this category. You have to have been sewing less than 3 years, I started October 7th 2017.

I could have spent an absolute fortune on fabric. There were just so many beautiful fabrics from so many different designers. I managed to pick myself up some bargains. I got some gorgeous fat quarters, some Christmas and some non Christmas.






I managed to pick up some good quality thread for £1 a reel. The pinky one is for me to finish a cushion cover as I didn't have any threads that were even close to the colour of the fabric. The blue thread is for my Christmas table runners. As I tried applique on my embroidery machine last week for the first time, I absolutely loved it.


Yesterday I found out my snowmen are going to be the Brother Embroidery machine group that I belong to banner for the month. Which was a wonderful surprise.

A lot of my Christmas fabric was bought to make Snowmen and Father Christmas table runners as gifts. So I went in with a set list and didn't deviate from my plan. It would have been incredibly easy to go mad but I have so much fabric that I need to only buy what I need, not what I want! Or I will have to make another scrap-busting quilt very soon!

By the time we had finished at the show I was getting cold and exhausted. I was in bed by 6.15pm as I could no longer hold myself upright and had already suffered a bad fall in the kitchen about a hour earlier caused by being over tired. I was asleep before 8pm and slept all the way through waking at around 6.30am. By 7am I had badly scalded myself with steam from the kettle so Monday was effectively written off as I spent the day on the sofa with my hand in a bowl of cold water.

Yesterday was pretty quiet too although I did manage to stitch out a cushion front for a friend. Only because hubby was home and I didn't have to do anything other than look after myself. I managed to forget to take my blood pressure boosting medications so by 4pm I was wondering if I would make it to dog training. I took my medication and had two cups of coffee and that saw me through. However this morning...Wednesday all the activity has caught up with me and I feel hungover, the concentration span of a gnat and every part of my body hurts.

I knew that I wouldn't get away with going out unscathed, I am a little surprised that it has taken over 48 hours to hit me properly. Normally it is 24 hours before I feel an outings / events full effects. But this was a huge deal and I had probably kept myself going with the adrenaline still firing and the fact Monday I couldn't do anything and I was still limited yesterday. There are always consequences, I will always end up paying for enjoying myself. I can't complain it is far worse not to have done anything and still wake up feeling like you have been run over by a truck. I might not look that sick but looks are very deceiving. Only people who really know me, know how I look when I am taking a nosedive. This morning I only had to catch sight of myself in the mirror to know that this was the day I would be paying for trying to be normal.

So it was a huge deal for me going out on Sunday, it wont be a regular thing as I don't want to spend days recovering no matter how much I enjoy myself. This is now recovery day three and this is the most multisystemic one. Today my blood pressure is misbehaving, I am white as a sheet and my pain is at a higher level than the norm. I would love nothing more than to announce that my health has made such a significant improval that a trip out with friends had no consequences for me but sadly that just isn't the case.

Massive thank you to Alison and Tracey for looking after me. Also Chris for driving us.




          

Look Beyond the Bogus Bonus Smokescreen   

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Taxpayers might be less skeptical of the born-again guardians of fiscal responsibility if these evangelists were actually practicing what they preached. While the Obama administration now issues impassioned calls to stop rewarding failure, they moved Thursday to dump another $5 billion into the failing auto industry. That's on top of Thursday's announcement by the Federal Reserve to print $1 trillion to buy Treasury bonds and mortgage securities sold by the government -- which no one else wants to buy.

Financial blogger Barry Ritholtz tallied up $8.5 trillion in bailout costs by December 2008 between Federal Reserve, FDIC, Treasury and Federal Housing Administration rescues (not including the $5.2 trillion in Fannie and Freddie portfolios that the U.S. taxpayer is now explicitly responsible for). Then there's the (at least) $50 billion proposed by Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner in February to bail out home owners and lenders who made bad home loan decisions, which would be just a small sliver of the $2.5 trillion he wants to spend on the next big banking bailout, which would draw on the second $350 billion of the TARP package over which an increasing number of Chicken Little lawmakers are having buyer's remorse.

Phew. We're not done yet: As AIG-bashing lawmakers inveighed against wasted taxpayer funds and lamented the lack of accountability and rush to judgment that led to passage of the porkulus bill that mysteriously protected the bonuses, the Senate quietly passed a $10 billion lands bill stuffed with earmarks and immunized from amendments. GOP Sen. Tom Coburn, fiscal conservative loner, pointed out that none of the provisions for special-interest pork projects -- including $3.5 million in spending for a birthday bash celebrating the city of St. Augustine, Fla. -- was subject to public hearings. That's on top of the pork-stuffed $410 billion spending bill passed two weeks ago.

Oh, and did I mention that the House passed a $6 billion volunteerism bill (the "GIVE Act") on Wednesday to provide yet another pipeline to left-wing advocacy groups under the guise of encouraging national service?

Also coming down the pike: the Obama administration's "cap-and-trade" global warming plan, which Hill staffers learned this week could cost close to $2 trillion (nearly three times the White House's initial estimate) and the administration's universal health care scheme, which health policy experts reported this week could cost about $1.5 trillion over the next decade.

It is no wonder that when earlier this week Vice President Joe Biden told local officials in Washington that he was "serious, absolutely serious" about policing wasteful spending in Washington, he was met with the only rational response his audience could muster: laughter.


          

Cube-Steak Americans vs. the Wagyu-Beef White House   

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Pollster John Zogby called the results "depressing." I beg to differ. Out of necessity, a consumption-based society is learning to live within its means. For decades, government policies fueled that insatiable appetite -- and new government programs are desperately trying to preserve it. But the Obama administration's frantic efforts to encourage more brainless home buying, car buying and consumer borrowing aren't producing their desired results. Generational theft, it seems, has a silver lining.

The phenomenon is spreading beyond America's borders. London-based economic journalist Hamish McRae recently observed: "We may be on the cusp of a big socioeconomic shift. We have had half a century when the developed world has gradually moved away from regarding thrift as a virtue. It has moved at different speeds in different countries, faster in the U.S. and UK than in Germany or China. ... We have created the institutional structure that has supported this shift: from credit cards to collateralized debt obligations (CDOs). The world has clearly reached a point where it can go no further down that road. ... The pendulum will swing back. How far and how fast we cannot tell, but we can be sure that debt will be regarded differently a generation from now."

President Obama, celebrated by his liberal media admirers for a miraculous ability to groove with the common man, hasn't yet caught on to the new age of individual austerity. As always, he talks a good game of "personal responsibility" and "sacrifice." But while penny-pinching Americans head to Sonic Drive-Ins for $1 everyday value meals or stay at home for cheap cube-steak dinners (sales of the inexpensive meat are up 10 percent), the White House serves up high-grade Wagyu beef to congressional revelers. The luxury item was on the menu for the bipartisan stimulus dinner in January, and was also served at the governors' dinner hosted at the White House two weeks ago.

Team Obama's image experts, perhaps hung over from all the Camelot-re-creating Wednesday cocktail parties that are now a signature of the new administration, have fallen down on the job. The man who scolded Americans for wasting energy and turning their thermostats too high still hasn't lowered his own. "He's from Hawaii, OK?" senior adviser David Axelrod snickered to The New York Times in January. "He likes it warm. You could grow orchids in there."

In flyover country, the mood could not be more different. Party time is over. I heard from a reader in northwest Arkansas, now upside down on her house with two college-age kids, who is preparing to tighten the family belt. President Obama, meet personal responsibility:

"We are ultimately responsible for the mess we are in. If my husband and I have to live in his pickup and get ready for work at the community gym, so be it. If we lose our jobs, we will move in with (my husband's) mother, and he will hunt and I will garden. We have never been on unemployment, welfare or other assistance. We are Americans. Our ancestors fought in the American Revolution, the Civil War, World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and his brother fought in Vietnam. Our family has faced tougher foes than this economy and Barack Obama. We will do as true Americans do; we will not whine, we will persevere."

Waste not, want not: Outside of Washington, it's the renewed American way.


          

Rebel Yell: Taxpayers Revolt Against Gimme-Mania   

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Some wore pig noses. Others waved Old Glory and "Don't Tread on Me" flags. Their handmade signs read: "Say No to Generational Theft"; "Obama'$ Porkulu$ Wear$ Lip$tick"; and "I don't want to pay for the SwindleUs! I'm only 10 years old!" The event was peaceful, save for an unhinged city-dweller who showed his tolerance by barging onto the speakers' stage and giving a Nazi salute.

Carender, a newcomer to political activism, shared advice for other first-timers: "Basically, everyone, you just have to do it. Call up your police station or parks department and ask how you can obtain a permit, and then just start advertising. The word will spread. I am only one person, but with a little hard work this protest has become the efforts of a lot of people."

Why bother? It's for posterity's sake. For the historical record. And hopefully it will spur others to move from the phones and computers to the streets. For Carender, it's just the beginning. She gathered all the attendees' e-mail addresses and will keep up the pressure.

"We need to show that we exist. Second, we need to show support for the Republicans and Democrats that voted against the porkulus. If they think, for one second, that they made a bad choice, we have no chance to fight. Third, it sends a message to Obama and Pelosi that we are awake and we know what's happening and we are not going to take it lying down. It is a message saying, 'Expect more opposition because we're out here.'"

The anti-pork activists turned out in Denver, too. On Tuesday, while Obama cocooned himself at the city's Museum of Nature and Science for the stimulus signing, a crowd of nearly 300 gathered on the Capitol steps on their lunch hour to flame-broil the spending bill and feast on roasted pig (also donated by yours truly). Jim Pfaff of Colorado's fiscal conservative citizens group Americans for Prosperity condemned the "Ponzi scheme, Madoff style" stimulus and led the crowd in chants of "No more pork!" Free-market think-tank head Jon Caldara of the Independence Institute brought oversized checks representing the $30,000 stimulus debt load for American families.

On Wednesday in Mesa, local conservative talk station KFYI spearheaded a third large protest to welcome Obama as he unveiled a $100 billion to $200 billion program to bail out banks and beleaguered borrowers having trouble paying their mortgages. The entitlement theme played well last week in Florida, where Obama played Santa Claus to enraptured supporters shamelessly seeking government presents. But nearly 500 protesters in Mesa came to reject the savior-based economy with signs mocking gimme-mania.

Their posters jeered: "Give me Pelosi's Plane"; "Annual Passes to Disneyland"; "Fund Bikini Wax Now"; "Stimulate the Economy: Give Me a Tummy Tuck"; "Free Beer for My Horses."

And my favorite: "Give me liberty or at least a big-screen TV."

Plans are underway for anti-stimulus-palooza protests in Overland Park, Kan., Nashville and New York -- home of smug Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer. Schumer's derisive comment on the Senate floor about the "chattering classes" who oppose reckless spending has not been forgotten or forgiven. The insult spurred central Kentucky talk show host Leland Conway to organize a pork rind drive. Angry taxpayers bombarded the senator's office with 1,500 bags of cracklins.

Disgraced Democratic Sen. John Edwards was right about one thing: There are two Americas. One America is full of moochers, big and small, corporate and individual, trampling over themselves with their hands out demanding endless bailouts. The other America is full of disgusted, hardworking citizens getting sick of being played for chumps and punished for practicing personal responsibility.

Now is the time for all good taxpayers to turn the tables on free-lunching countrymen and their enablers in Washington. Community organizing helped propel Barack Obama to the White House. It can work for fiscal conservatism, too.


          

Whicker: Ryan Zimmerman and the Nationals insist on hanging around   

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Washington's Zimmerman and Max Scherzer score points for the 35-year-old set in a Game 4 victory that sets up a tantalizing pitching matchup for the winner-take-all Game 5 on Wednesday at Dodger Stadium.

          

Whicker: Ryan Zimmerman and the Nationals insist on hanging around   

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Washington's Zimmerman and Max Scherzer score points for the 35-year-old set in a Game 4 victory that sets up a tantalizing pitching matchup for the winner-take-all Game 5 on Wednesday at Dodger Stadium.

          

Swing-state town hall finds voters more consumed by health care, education than Trump impeachment probe   

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Of the 31 questions Rep. Susan Wild took from constituents during her Wednesday town hall, the topic of impeachment came up just a few times.
       

          

Schultz, Jack A.   

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Jack A. Schultz Waukesha - Found peace September 29, 2019 at the age of 68. Loving husband of Margaret "Peggy". Memorial gathering Wednesday October...

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