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George Washington on the Difference between Commercial and Political Relations with other Countries (1796)   

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George Washington on the Difference between Commercial and Political Relations with other Countries (1796)


          

George Washington warns that the knee jerk reaction of citizens to problems is to seek a solution in the creation of a "new monarch"(1786)   

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George Washington warns that the knee jerk reaction of citizens to problems is to seek a solution in the creation of a “new monarch”(1786)


          

George Washington warns the nation in his Farewell Address, that love of power will tend to create a real despotism in America unless proper checks and balances are maintained to limit government power (1796)   

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George Washington warns the nation in his Farewell Address, that love of power will tend to create a real despotism in America unless proper checks and balances are maintained to limit government power (1796)


          

Word Processor/ Transcriptionist - Washington - Jamison Professional Services Inc - Olympia, WA   

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(“JPS”) is currently seeking qualified and motivated candidate for the position of WORD PROCESSOR / TRANSCRIPTIONIST. Minimum a High School diploma preferred.
From Jamison Professional Services Inc - Fri, 07 Jun 2019 00:58:28 GMT - View all Olympia, WA jobs

          

Trump's Syria withdrawal announcement draws GOP condemnation   

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WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump's sudden decision to pull back U.S. troops from northern Syria drew quick, strong criticism Monday from some of his closest allies in Congress. It was condemned ... - Source: www.arkansasonline.com

          

North Korea rejects idea of holding more nuke talks   

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North Korea said Sunday that it has no desire to engage in more "sickening negotiations" with the United States unless Washington abandons its "hostile policy" against Pyongyang. - Source: www.arkansasonline.com

          

President Trump Sings Softly, Tenderly To Vladimir Putin - "He's my widdow Wushian Pootie Poo! Yes he is! Yes he iiiiiiiiiiis!"   

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Washington DC - President Trump sang It's A Small World After All while rocking a sleeping Vladimir Putin in his lap, a practice that his staff says has become too frequent and too troubling. "My staff, and even America, will never understand," sa...

          

What Richmond can teach Washington about transit   

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Reliability and frequency are important factors in growing ridership.

          

Impeachment? Add it to the list of reasons bills are sidetracked   

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IMAGE: CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn By Mark Pattison WASHINGTON (CNS) — So an impeachment query in the House, and a potential trial in the Senate, want to get in the way of legislation being considered in Congress? Take a number. Advocates for several Catholic organizations interviewed by Catholic News Service said

          

Justice is ‘a divine characteristic’ of God, archbishop says at Red Mass   

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IMAGE: CNS photo/Andrew Biraj, Catholic Standard By Mark Zimmermann WASHINGTON (CNS) — Addressing a congregation that included Supreme Court justices and law students attending the Oct. 6 Red Mass at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington, Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory encouraged those involved in law to reflect

          

Couch Slouch: Still riled up about replay reviews   

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Note to readers: I had not planned to pen a second consecutive column on officiating, but a couple of readers got me really riled up.

So one reader emailed that I “misused” the term “slippery slope” and another told me I had “misappropriated” the term last week when I wrote that replay as an officiating tool is a slippery slope.

Balderdash.

Incidentally, whether I use or misuse, appropriate or misappropriate any term is up to me. It’s my column, my time, my two cents’ worth – well, at least until we ban the penny. So bug off and go read The New Yorker if you crave more precise and correct use of the language.

And, what, now we’re going to have replay challenges on my column? No, no, no, no, no. I write it, you read it, and we move on. I’m not going to sit here beholden to every Tom, Dick and Harriet googling my every proclamation and preposition.

I stand by my work, week in and week out. Like Andy Reid just said, “Not all of Mozart’s paintings were perfect.”

But I digress.

For those of you who found my “slippery slope syndrome” explanation wanting, let me then switch replay gears and present my “small barking dog syndrome.”

Sometimes there is a small, barking dog at your ankles that keeps nipping at your pants cuff. It’s irritating, yet not enough to do more than shake your leg occasionally to free yourself of the dog’s grip. But then you look down several minutes later and notice that this small barking yapping irritating creature has ripped your pants leg completely wide open.

And, there, my friends, you have the basic problem of replay as an officiating tool.

So I again plead to Sports Nation – let’s return to kinder, simpler pre-replay days.

(People often fault me for “living in the past.” Uh, I can’t live in the future, can I? I am the product of two centuries; both have their merits and their flaws. Alas, replay as an officiating tool was mindlessly birthed in the 20th century and is reaching its devastating potential in the 21st century. Then again, since I have serious doubts if there will be a 22nd century, this problem might solve itself.)

Many people think officiating, particularly in the NFL and the NBA, is worse than ever; it’s not. The officials are just scrutinized more than ever.

Do you think there was replay review when the games used to be only on radio?

Are games harder to officiate now because athletes are bigger, stronger and faster? Maybe. But it’s definitely harder to officiate when millions are officiating alongside you. There are even websites, like footballzebras.com, that assess and review officials’ calls 24-7.

Trust me, it would not be half as fun being an actuary if every line of your work were under replay review.

And when’s the last time you saw, say, a ballet or an opera stopped because of a replay challenge? Man, those would be momentum killers – for instance, “La Boheme” would lose all of its steam if, just before Mimi’s climactic coughing fit, Schaunard questions the receipt on the pink bonnet that Rodolpho has bought for her and throws the challenge flag.

The fact of the matter is, there are fouls and penalties committed on virtually every possession in basketball, football and life.

If you whistled every foul in the NBA by the book, every player would foul out.

If you called every holding by an offensive lineman or every pass interference, NFL games would take five hours.

If you held a U.S. president accountable for every high crime and misdemeanor committed while in the Oval Office, we wouldn’t have a president.

Sometimes – particularly on the field of play – you just have to let stuff go.

(Best I can tell, the major professional sport least affected at this point by replay is hockey. So, maybe, just maybe – I know I’m going to regret this – NHL, here I come! When does the regular season start?)

Ask The Slouch

Q. When the Chicago Bears announced Mitch Trubisky injured his “non-throwing shoulder,” did your finely honed journalism instincts lead you to ask if the team could be more specific? (Jeremy Sandler; Toronto)

A. Pay the man, Shirley.

Q. Even the slightest improvement in equipment can give an athlete a competitive advantage. Shouldn’t some company start making underwear for left-handed men? (Jack Leininger; Spokane, Wash.)

A. Pay the man, Shirley.

Q. Do you have any insight as to whether NBA referee Scott Foster is the “whistleblower” that President Trump is looking for? (Elliott Jaffa; Arlington, Va.)

A. Pay the man, Shirley.

Q. Do you miss when the Washington R*dsk*ns used to win the offseason? I mean, it was a win. (Mike Garland; Washington, D.C.)

A. Pay the man, Shirley.

You, too, can enter the $1.25 Ask The Slouch Cash Giveaway. Just emailasktheslouch@aol.com and, if your question is used, you win $1.25 in cash!


          

First look: Washington State at No. 18 Arizona State   

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What is it? Washington State (3-2, 0-2) looks to break out of a two-game funk in Pac-12 play when it travels to face No. 18 Arizona State (4-1, 1-1).

Where is it? Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe.

When is it? Kickoff is 12:30 p.m. Saturday.

Where can I watch it? The game will air on the Pac-12 Networks.

Who is favored? ASU opened as a three-point favorite.

How did they fare last week? The Cougars and Sun Devils were both idle this week. Previously, Washington State suffered a 38-13 loss to Utah in Salt Lake City, while Arizona State edged Cal 24-17 on Friday night in Berkeley.

Why WSU will win: If the Cougars can merely match their season average for scoring offense, they’ll have an opportunity to walk away with their first conference win. While ASU has shown some offensive improvement in Pac-12 play, the Sun Devils are still 10th in the conference, scoring 22.8 points per game – half as many as the Cougars, who are No. 1 in the league at 44.8 ppg. The Sun Devils have had one of the conference’s top defenses this season, but in five games, they’ve faced only one top-50 offense (Colorado) and haven’t encountered one that’s scoring more than 35 ppg. While the Cougars dropped consecutive Pac-12 games in 2016, they haven’t lost three in a row since 2014, which was also the last time WSU missed out on a postseason berth.

Why ASU will win: While Mike Leach believes Tracy Claeys’ sudden exit could be a spark for his football team, it’s anyone’s guess how a midseason defensive coordinator shakeup affects preparation and performance on game day. More pertinent than that, though, are all the areas in which the Cougars have struggled defensively this season. WSU hasn’t faced a truly prolific passing attack this season, yet the Cougars have given up 841 yards and seven touchdowns through the air the last two games. Jayden Daniels and the Sun Devils aren’t known for their aerial prowess, either, but ASU’s freshman QB, similar to UCLA’s Dorian Thompson-Robinson and Utah’s Tyler Huntley is a capable runner who can make things happen outside of the pocket and make the Cougars pay if they aren’t disciplined in pass coverage. WSU avoided Zack Moss in Salt Lake City, but the Cougars won’t be able to escape ASU’s Eno Benjamin, who’s rushed for 392 yards and six touchdowns this season.

What happened last time: Due to Pac-12 scheduling rotations, it’s been three full years since the Cougars and Sun Devils met last. In 2016, WSU extended what would become an eight-game win streak with a 37-32 win over ASU in the desert. After Mike Leach accused Sun Devils coach Todd Graham of stealing signals during a mid-week press conference, the Cougars and Luke Falk passed for 398 yards, while Gabe Marks made eight grabs for 107 yards and a touchdown. WSU trailed 14-3 early, but safety Robert Taylor made it a one-score game when he returned a kickoff 100 yards for a touchdown, and the Cougars scored 28 consecutive points to lead by as many as 17 points.


          

Late afternoon kickoff time set for Homecoming game between Washington State, Colorado   

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PULLMAN – Washington State and Colorado drew a late afternoon kickoff time for the Oct. 19 Homecoming game at Martin Stadium.

The Cougars and Buffaloes will kick off at 4 p.m. next Saturday, the Pac-12 announced Monday morning. The ESPN family of networks will carry the broadcast, but it’s still to be determined whether the action will air on ESPN2 or ESPNU.

Kickoff times and television slots were announced for four other Pac-12 games taking place on Oct. 19. Oregon State’s game at Cal will kick off at 11:30 a.m. on the Pac-12 Networks, Oregon’s game at Washington will start at 12:30 p.m. on ABC, Arizona State’s game at Utah will kick off at 3 p.m. on the Pac-12 Networks and Arizona’s game at USC will start at 6:30 p.m. and air on the Pac-12 Networks.

Colorado, under the direction of first-year coach Mel Tucker, will be looking to break a two-game losing streak against Washington State, which shut the Buffaloes out 28-0 two years ago in Pullman and beat them 31-7 last year in Boulder.


          

Clean jerseys of wide receivers spell trouble for Huskies’ passing game   

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STANFORD, Calif. – The Washington Huskies’ passing game is broken.

That fact was evident at 10:48 on Saturday night as Chris Petersen’s Huskies trudged in a sad procession toward the southeast tunnel at Stanford Stadium. As they did, the public address announcer boomed, “When the eastern part of the country wakes up in the morning, they’ll see the final score: Stanford 23, Washington 13!”

Senior wide receiver Aaron Fuller walked with his helmet on, head down, his once-white jersey now stained various shades of green and red. The jersey, in this case, was a visual receipt; it spoke silently, but unmistakably, reflecting Fuller’s substantial role in the Husky offense.

Terrell Bynum’s jersey was clean. Andre Baccellia’s jersey was clean. Quinten Pounds’ jersey was clean. Marquis Spiker’s jersey was clean. Austin Osborne’s jersey was clean. Puka Nacua’s jersey was clean.

They either didn’t receive an opportunity, or failed to take advantage when they did.

Indeed, the 5-foot-11, 188-pound Fuller was targeted a whopping 17 times Saturday night, and turned in nine catches (and at least three drops) for 171 yards, with a long of 37.

Otherwise, UW’s remaining wide receivers combined for an utterly incompetent two catches for 10 yards … which all came in the fourth quarter. No other Husky pass-catcher was targeted more than five times on the night. Junior tight end Hunter Bryant caught just one pass for 8 yards and dropped a pair of passes that would have extended drives on third down.

Junior quarterback Jacob Eason, meanwhile, completed all five of his pass attempts for 56 yards and a touchdown in his team’s torrid opening drive. He completed 11 of 31 passes for 150 yards and an interception, while being sacked twice, the rest of the way.

It’s been written before, but bears repeating: entering the game, Stanford’s defense ranked 127th nationally in opponent completion percentage (70.6), 126th in opponent pass efficiency rating (170.60), 124th in opponent yards per attempt (9.4), 115th in passing defense (287.4 yards a game) and 111th in touchdown passes allowed (11).

So how did this happen? Or, as Petersen was asked in the postgame news conference, “What needs to change to get the passing game going?”

“That’s a good question. That’s a good question,” he repeated. “(There were) dropped balls, and we’ve got to give our quarterback more answers, too. I know a couple times he was standing back there without answers.

“But you couple that with little protection stuff and he’s running around, and a couple guys didn’t make plays for him. And when you’re not going to get the ball a bunch, you better capitalize.”

Here’s what not-getting-the-ball-a-bunch looks like: Baccellia, UW’s senior starter opposite Fuller, has excelled in three nonconference games – posting 13 catches for 195 and two touchdowns.

But in three games against Pac-12 competition, he has been rendered utterly ineffective, managing just six catches – two per game – for 41 yards. Still, the coaching staff has (perhaps stubbornly) stuck with him. Saturday, he contributed one essentially irrelevant catch for a single yard on five targets.

Senior wide receiver Chico McClatcher, meanwhile, has not caught a pass since the 52-20 victory over Hawaii on Sept. 14. Nacua – a 6-1, 204-pound former four-star freshman – has been targeted a grand total of one time this season, and he turned that target into a picturesque 28-yard touchdown. And it’s not that Puka isn’t playing, either; the highly touted freshman receiver just rarely runs a route. Most often, he enters the game, blocks for a running play and then immediately exits again. This begs the obvious question: they burned his redshirt so he could block?

As for the trio of talented former four-star redshirt freshmen, Austin Osborne has recorded one catch for minus-2 yards this season. Spiker – who holds the California state prep record with 72 receiving touchdowns – has played in three games without earning a target, and 182-pound speedster Trey Lowe has been sidelined for the first six games with an infection.

Petersen often has repeated that those who practice most consistently will earn opportunities in games. But, if Fuller and Baccellia are so much better than everybody else, isn’t that also an issue? If players as presumably talented as Nacua, Osborne and Spiker all can’t earn a target in a lopsided 10-point defeat, who’s really to blame?

When asked if UW’s pass game woes can be traced to personnel and an inability to get open, Petersen said, “I think it’s everything. We’ll look at the tape there. But like I said, I know a couple times we’ve just got to cut our losses. (Eason) threw a couple good balls in there that we didn’t make plays on. We’ve got do a better job, there’s no question, in the pass game.”

In three nonconference games, Eason has completed 77.5% of his passes, throwing for 901 yards and 10 touchdowns with one interception (while being sacked just once).

Meanwhile, in three Pac-12 contests, the former Lake Stevens High School standout has completed just 54.3% of his passes, throwing for 548 yards with one touchdown and two interceptions (while being sacked seven times).

In Eason, Washington touts perhaps the Pac-12’s (and the nation’s?) most physically talented passer. And yet the Huskies rank sixth in the conference in passing touchdowns (11), seventh in completion percentage (65.8), eighth in yards per attempt (8.1) and pass efficiency rating (150.4) and ninth in passing offense (248.8 yards a game).

Too often, Eason has stood in the backfield without any answers. Perhaps that’s play-calling. Perhaps it’s personnel, or coaching, or preparation, or all of the above. With UW’s next three Pac-12 games coming against 4-1 Arizona, 4-1 Oregon and 4-1 Utah, Petersen and Co., have precious little time to improve their suddenly incompetent passing attack.

The Huskies’ jerseys were clean on Saturday night.

Their execution was anything but.


          

A Grip on Sports: Young Zags and an old story highlight a Cougar-less Saturday   

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A GRIP ON SPORTS • It’s a rare fall Saturday the past couple decades in which we haven’t had to work. Which opened an almost unlimited vista of opportunities on a clear, crisp day. We stayed (or went) inside. But that doesn’t mean we didn’t watch sports. And learn some things.

•••••••

• Thanks to a family friend, Kim and I were able to attend the Kraziness in the Kennel with some VIP perks. What does that mean? Our line was shorter, we got to mingle and watch TV, enjoy a cold beverage – don’t worry, I had diet soda – and sit in decent seats.

Oh, and catch up with some old friends, which is always nice. Then find out the oldest of Gonzaga’s friendly men’s basketball players is out again, though Mark Few wouldn’t term Killian Tillie’s absence Saturday injury-based. Sure, Tillie had surgery again, but it was preventative, sort of like why we take a cholesterol pill every night.

We do it to make sure there are no problems down the road.

As John Blanchette points out in his column this morning, that would go down easier with the Zag faithful if it applied to anyone other than Tillie, the most snakebit player Gonzaga has had since at least Josh Heytvelt.

The guy sitting in front of me sure had a lot to say about that, none of it positive. His response to the news of Tillie's surgery seemed a little out of proportion, venom-wise. And we thought GU fans were more of the nurturing, loving type.

Few is going to have to be a bit more nurturing and loving this season, that’s for sure. All but three players on the court yesterday afternoon were new to the roster (four when you count Tillie). Two are senior transfers (Admon Gilder and Ryan Gilder, both guards and both players who will contribute). The rest are freshmen.

Six of them.

Do they have talent? Of course they do. They wouldn’t be at GU if they didn’t. But nothing can make them older except time, practice and a tough non-conference schedule.

The Zags will scrimmage with Michigan State, a lot of folks’ pick to win the NCAA title. They will play at Texas A&M, Gilder’s old school. They will face quality in the Bahamas at a Thanksgiving tournament. They play at Washington and Arizona, two of the Pac-12’s better teams, in December. And they host North Carolina, the bluest of blue bloods.

No wonder Few told the crowd it would play a bigger-than-usual role in helping his team this season.

Their voices and support won’t help, though, as much as the passage of time.

• There is one nice perk when the Pac-12 team you follow (in my case, for work) has a bye. You get to focus on the conference’s other games. Sometimes that isn’t good.

If you happened to watch Stanford’s upset of Washington (and I did) last night, you were able to experience a little of why the conference has such a poor reputation concerning its officiating.

Sorry to go there, but there were so many little things done poorly, it undermines the fans’ confidence the conference’s representatives will get the big things right.

Case in point, a first-half punt. What happened seems minor, but it isn’t. Mainly because it was so embarrassing.

With time running down in the half and Stanford hoping to extend a 13-10 lead, the Huskies’ Joel Whitford uncorked a line-drive punt. It was so short it hit a Washington player in the leg at the Stanford 27-yard line, then kicked forward and rolled dead at the 10.

Everyone in the stadium knew it happened, including the officials and the ESPN announcers. What the former group didn’t know, however, was exactly where. Those of us at home did – as should of the folks in the replay booth. All we (and they) had to do was hit one button on the remote to see. It was the 27. That’s where the ball should have been marked. It wasn’t. When referee Kevin Mar came on our screen to explain, he told us about the touching and where it occurred. He said the 20-yard line, a point at which the ball had been rolling free. He and his crew were wrong.

This is what replay is meant for. The clock is stopped, the mistake is obvious. Buzz down and fix it. Nope. The ball stayed at the 20. Thousand of people watching at home, including the folks in charge of the conference’s officiating and those in charge of its image, knew it was wrong. Fix it. Nope. The ball stayed at the 20.

By the way, those seven yards may have ultimately cost Stanford a shot at a long Jet Toner field goal attempt. We will never know. But we do know the Cardinal didn’t start their possession in the right spot.

•••

WSU: Even though Theo Lawson was enjoying the bye week by celebrating friends’ nuptials (hey, he put his plans on Twitter, so I don’t feel bad sharing), he still talked with Mike Leach and let the Cougar coach enlighten us on defensive coordinator Tracy Claeys’ departure. Though Leach’s comments didn’t shed a whole lot of light on the change. …The letters to the editor on Leach's comments following the Utah loss were mixed in nature. … Elsewhere in the Pac-12, the standings seem a bit upside down right now. … Stanford controlled the line of scrimmage, made plays when it had to and ultimately held off Washington in the upset of the day. The Huskies never found their rhythm in the loss. … California shut outOregon for a half, then the Ducks asserted themselves to gain a tight home win. The Bears' lack of offense cost them in the end. … The Arizona offense came alive behind a healthyKhalil Tate and the Wildcats won in Colorado. The Buffs might be better than their record, however. They certainly are beat up. … UCLAcertainly isn't all that good. The Bruins looked poor again as Oregon State went into the Rose Bowl and outscoredthe host team, adding to Chip Kelly's woes. … The college athletic model will change.

Gonzaga: The Kraziness in the Kennel was just that, especially in the way the Gonzaga students went out of their way to make a quartet of recruits feel wanted (Justin Reed has a story). Besides the Killie injury (as we said, covered in John’s column), the news was a nearly new roster for the Zags. In Mark Few’s years on campus there has probably a season with more turnover – after more than three decades as an assistant and a head coach, it’s hard to imagine anything new – but we can’t think of one. Jim covers that aspect of the day. … Jim has another story as he passed along the news freshman Oumar Ballo, the most physically impressive player on the court, is still waiting for the NCAA to rule on his eligibility. … Jesse Tinsley braved the crowds of cameras for the best shots in this photo gallery.

EWU: Our Ryan Collingwood was in Sacramento, probably to catch up with his yearly quota of In-N-Out, but also to cover the game. He has this story. … Around the Big Sky,

Idaho: A week after dropping a road game to woeful Northern Colorado – the Bears are 1-5 after losing at Northern Arizona yesterday – the Vandals looked like a Big Sky contender again Saturday. But fourth-ranked Weber State was able to hold on for 41-35 win in the Kibbie Dome. Peter Harriman has the coverage.

Whitworth: The Pirates finally played at home Saturday and my, how did they play. How does winning 82-7 sound? Dan Thompson was at the Pine Bowl and has this game story.

Preps: There was one football game left over from Friday night, pushed back to Saturday after some lightning around Albi Stadium. The was some lightning yesterday, but it was all confined to the playing surface and most of it supplied by Lewis and Clark’s Keani Guthmueller. Dave Nichols was there and he has this story on LC’s 43-36 win over Post Falls. … Gonzaga Prep wing Liam Lloyd announced his college commitment yesterday, going on social media to tell everyone he will be playing at Grand Canyon College. Dave has a story on that as well. … Mead golfer Matt Jones was under par last weekend in an event at Pebble Beach. That news is part of our local briefs.

Chiefs: Spokane’s offense stayed hot, rolling Tri-City 7-1 last night in Kennewick.

Seahawks: No game today. Isn't that odd? Let's look ahead instead.

•••       

• Because Kim and I were out and about yesterday, I didn’t get anything I wanted done. Which means my Sunday will be busy. At least the sun will be out and  temperature is going to be in the high 50s today, making the mowing and raking and fertilizing a little more enjoyable. Until later …


          

Fishtrap Lake becoming trekking destination on heels of 4,000 volunteer hours   

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Following years of planning and construction, two new nonmotorized trails at Fishtrap Lake Recreation Area are finished, offering visitors an intimate view of channeled scablands that were roughed out by cataclysmic Ice Age Floods.

Trail markers were set to be installed this weekend, but hikers, mountain bikers and equestrians who already had found their way around the loops since spring are giving rave reviews.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management began planning the new trails in 2013, two years after Bob Strong, a Spokane hiker, suggested the Fishtrap experience would be vastly more stimulating if a trail system could be established beyond the old ranch roads that had served the previous private landowners.

The “Miller Ranch” had been in Charles Miller’s family since 1871 before he and his wife, Diane, sold the 8,000 acres to BLM for $2.5 million in 1992. Summer cattle grazing is still allowed, as fall hikers will notice as they occasionally skip over the cow pies.

Strong was right. The new trails – the product of more than 4,000 hours of volunteer planning and labor – form two joined loops of 4.9 miles and 5.3 miles. The lead visitors to sites never seen from the road routes. Combining the two loops into a figure-8 route makes an outstanding 10-mile trek for foot, bike or horse.

Of the 446,000 acres in Washington managed by BLM, the Fishtrap Recreation Area is emerging as a natural standout for trails. And it’s just 30 minutes west of Spokane.

Straddling the Spokane-Lincoln county line, the federal land is a textbook example of channeled scablands that flourish with native plants and wildlife some 12,000-15,000 years after being ravaged by a series of violent floods emanating from Lake Missoula during the Ice Age. The centerpiece is 190-acre Fishtrap Lake, perhaps best-known in modern times for its spring-summer fishing season for trout stocked by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Fishtrap had long been an attraction for Native Americans who foraged there and used traps to catch fish near the outlet. “That’s the source of the lake’s name,” BLM archeologist Anne Boyd said.

Some of the rock in the area includes a high amount of flint-like materials Native Americans could collect to make arrowheads, knives, spear points and other tools that require a sharp edge, she said. “Natural caves formed during Ice Age Floods were used as rock shelters.”

Fishtrap Lake trails are especially inviting starting in March when hikers are antsy to stretch their legs long before mountain trails are snow-free, said Holly Weiler, the Washington Tails Association’s East Side projects coordinator.

“I’ve never seen so much wildflower diversity in one hike,” she said at the end of a late-May outing. She also pointed out that islands of golden aspens light up among scattered ponderosa pines during fall.

“You can hike there through November, and I’ve cross-country skied there in winter when conditions allow. There’s so much more to that country that what you see from Interstate 90.”

Indeed, the variety of habitats – wetlands, ponds, lakes, riparian, brush, forest, sage, steppe and grassland have created an outstanding birding spot. Fishtrap is a favorite for native plant groups to visit. Geology enthusiasts know there are mysterious mima mounds to ponder and much more to discover.

Groundbreaking for the new trails began on Sept. 26, 2015, as WTA, the Spokane Mountaineers and Backcountry Horsemen teamed with pulaskis and other tools to celebrate National Public Lands Day with a work party.

“There was some rocky ground to deal with and drainage is an issue in some places,” Weiler said. “Despite the arid look to the area, there are a lot of wetlands with lush growth.”

The biggest problem for trail makers was dealing with the changes to the landscape caused by the Watermelon Hill fire that leaped through 13,000 acres in 2014. “Snags from the fire’s impact on ponderosa pine stands created hazards, especially when the wind blew,” she said.

That hazard lingers in a few spots five years after the fire. “One small area had 11 blowdowns after wind events this spring,” Weiler said.

Steve Smith, BLM’s Spokane-based recreation manager, said he had organized horsemen to join Weiler this weekend in marking the loops with flexible fiberglass Carsonite posts.

Now the trails need visits and wear from hooves, fat tires and feet to keep them tramped out and visible.

Fishtrap South Loop

The South Loop is 5.3 miles and 500 feet of cumulative elevation gain that reward hikers with impressive views of the lake, geologic features, wetlands and a break at Farmer’s Landing.

Start through the gate at the northeast end of the parking lot and hike the loop clockwise.

The singletrack trail passes wetlands on the right, rock outcroppings on the left, and goes through the middle of an aspen grove before reaching an earthen stock pond where ducks often rest.

Continue through the gate in the fence and hike up the draw until the trail climbs onto the flat above. At 1.2 miles, bear right on a doubletrack trail coming from the Miller Ranch House trailhead. Go a short way and notice the North Loop trail merging in from the left. Go a short way farther and take the singletrack angling left off the wider trail. The two loop trails share this 0.7-mile segment heading southeast, down off the plateau to a junction (at mile 2 of the hike) on a bluff above The Narrows of Fishtrap Lake.

To do the 10-mile figure 8 loop, go left (north) here. To stay on the South Loop, turn right and hike a scenic 0.2-mile stretch of the bluff with the lake on your left. Watch for cliff swallows and turkey vultures during summer.

The trail makes an S curve away from the lake, goes through fence gate and climbs up to a flat area. Check out the spur trail at 2.6 miles leading left to a scenic point above a cliff that drops to the lake. The crater, big enough to swallow a house on the north side of the spur trail, is a kolk – the erosive result of powerful whirlpools during the Ice Age Floods.

From here, the main trail heads west and then bends south and drops into a vegetated basin of timber heavily impacted by the 2014 Watermelon Fire. Skirt along the cattails rimming a large pothole and up through a pass to another bluff walk. Soon you’ll drop down to an open point and picnic spot called Farmers Landing, at 3.6 miles. The lake ends a half mile to the south.

The singletrack heads west from Farmers Landing, through a low, wet area, then merging with a doubletrack that leads 1.7 miles back to the trailhead. The sound of gunfire is common in this stretch from target shooting that occurs nearby.

If water is flowing across the trail in a wetland 0.4 mile before reaching the trailhead, look upstream to the right for boards that enable a dry crossing.

Fishtrap North Loop

The North Loop is 4.9 miles with 460 feet of elevation gain rewarded with long stretches of wide open views and a trip to the lake’s edge and back.

Go through the Fishtrap Road parking lot gate. Head south on a doubletrack for nearly 0.4 mile and bear right on a singletrack that forks west at 0.6 mile between two pothole craters. Then the trail heads south along an open rim with wetlands on your right. Bitterroots bloom in the gravely areas here in late May.

At 1.9 miles, the route makes a sharp left onto a double track that’s coming from Miller Ranch House. Go a short way south and bear left on a singletrack that’s shared with the South Loop to a junction on a scenic bluff overlooking The Narrows of Fishtrap Lake at 2.7 miles.

To do the 10-mile figure-8 loop, go right (south) here. To stay on the North Loop, turn left and head north with the lake on your right for 0.8 mile before the trail turns left from a bluff and leaves the lake behind. Hike to a junction at 3.6 miles and turn right onto a doubletrack.

At 3.9 mile, be on guard for the singletrack angling off to the left. (The doubletrack will get you back to the trailhead, but the singletrack offers more interesting scenery.)

Climb up to a plateau. At nearly 4.3 miles, bear right onto the familiar trail between two pothole craters and hike 0.6 mile north to the trailhead.


          

Cameron Scarlett’s career day helps Stanford beat No. 15 Washington   

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STANFORD, Calif. – Cameron Scarlett rushed for a career-high 157 yards and a touchdown, quarterback Davis Mills had another impressive game in place of injured starter K.J. Costello before apparently getting hurt himself, and Stanford pulled off its biggest win of the season, stunning No. 15 Washington 23-13 on Saturday night.

The Cardinal (3-3, 2-2 Pac-12) extended their home winning streak to six games, dating to 2007, against the Huskies with a plodding, methodical offense that kept Washington quarterback Jacob Eason on the sidelines for long chunks of the game.

Stanford dominated Washington (4-2, 1-2 Pac-12) in nearly every offensive category and held an 18-minute edge in time of possession.

Jet Toner added three field goals to help the Cardinal, who have won back-to-back games following a three-game losing streak.

Mills was crisp until coming out of the game for an unknown reason in the middle of a scoring drive in the fourth quarter. Mills was 21-of-30 passing for 293 yards and a touchdown, but spent the final 9 minutes on the sidelines with what appeared to be a bag of ice wrapped around his left calf. Jack West ran the offense down the stretch.

Stanford got a big lift from its defense, which harassed Eason into an interception and forced a punt on Washington’s first two drives in the fourth quarter.

Eason was 15 of 35 for 181 yards, one touchdown and one interception.


          

Sacramento State racks up 471 yards of offense, upsets No. 22 Eastern Washington 48-27   

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SACRAMENTO, California – A towel on his head and hands on his face, Eastern Washington quarterback Eric Barriere appeared dejected as he sat alone on the Hornet Stadium bench midway through the second quarter.

Barriere was shelved for portions of the second and third quarters after being looked at by trainers for an unspecified injury, but Sacramento State had already established a two-touchdown lead before his initial exit, including a Barriere interception that turned into a 27-yard scoring return.

When the Walter Payton Award candidate returned after a few fruitless drives with backup Gunner Talkington, the Eagles regained their pulse, pulling within a possession of the resurgent Hornets, who then had a clock-eating touchdown drive for a 41-27 lead.

George Obinna then proceeded to add an exclamation point.

Sacramento State’s star defensive end picked up a Barriere fumble in the final 2 minutes and rumbled 73 yards for the Hornets’ in a convincing 48-27 upset of the swooning Eagles.

The Hornets (3-2, 1-0 Big Sky) totaled 471 yards against EWU, their first home win over the Eagles in program history.

The Eagles (2-4, 1-1) were picked to win the Big Sky and were ranked as high as No. 4 in the preseason. With five games remaining, they will likely have to win out for a chance at a playoff berth or a possible share of the title.

EWU offensive tackle Chris Schlichting held back emotion as he voiced his frustration over the loss and the program’s worst start since 2011.

“We have potential All-Americans all throughout that locker room, we have dudes who know what they’re doing, so this is just hard,” Schlichting said. “Especially since you want to win for the fans and win for this university, then you do stuff like this.”

Sacramento State, led by former EWU offensive coordinator Troy Taylor, was also menacing on defense.

Leading the Big Sky in fewest points allowed heading into the game, Sacramento State piled up seven sacks in its first win over an Football Championship Subdivision Top 25 team since 2012.

Hornets quarterback Kevin Thomson orchestrated a lengthy, 13-play touchdown drive in the fourth quarter to make it 41-27 with 6:16 remaining that took away the Eagles’ momentum.

Thomson, an Auburn, Washington, native, passed for 315 yards and three touchdowns, helping the Hornets jump out to an early 21-7 lead. He wasn’t sacked.

Elijah Dotson also frustrated the Eagles with 103 rushing yards.

The typically downtrodden Hornets have also shut out Northern Colorado 50-0 and gave brawny Football Bowl Subdivision foes Arizona State (19-7 loss) and Fresno State (34-20 loss) fits.

“We came in with the expectation to win the game, and nobody blinked,” said Taylor, an offensive coordinator at EWU in 2016. “Everyone bought it and it’s nice to see them rewarded with a big win.”

EWU came out hot, though.

The Eagles scored on the game’s opening possession, a 12-play drive capped by Barriere’s 7-yard touchdown pass to Talolo Limu-Jones.

When Barriere left in the second quarter with his team trailing, the Eagles were ineffective. Talkington struggled through a series of three-and-out drives, completing 2 of 11 passes for 27 yards, and was sacked twice.

“We’re depleted, but so what – that’s not an excuse,” EWU coach Aaron Best said. “We’re not good enough in some areas. We aren’t disciplined enough in areas. We don’t make enough plays in areas and we hold too much on offense.”

Barriere completed 22 of 42 passes for 309 yards, two touchdowns an interception and rushed for 103 yards and a touchdown on 12 carries, a statistic boosted by a 92-yard touchdown run in the first half.

“He was shifty, hard to tackle,” Obinna said of Barriere. “Every time he ran out of the pocket, it was an extra effort. But just trusting everyone to do their job is what it came down to.”

EWU’s Jayson Williams hauled in seven passes for 129 yards a touchdown and Dehonta Hayes and a game-high 17 tackles. Hayes was also ejected for a late targeting penalty.


          

Indian American Rajeev D. Majumdar Sworn-in as President of Washington State Bar Association   

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SEATTLE, WA(TIP): Indian origin Rajeev D. Majumdar has been sworn in as President of the Washington State Bar Association (WSBA) on Sept 26. Washington Supreme Court Justice Steven C. González administered the oath of office [...]

          

Global Entry Program Introduced for Indian citizens residing in USA   

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WASHINGTON (TIP): As part of the citizen-centric service, Embassy of India, Washington DC and Consulates General of India in Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, New York, and San Francisco introduced the system of accepting GEP applications by [...]

          

India sought a solution while Pakistan was comfortable with continuing with cross-border terrorism: Dr. S Jaishankar   

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WASHINGTON(TIP): External Affairs Minister (EAM), Dr. S Jaishankar concluded a comprehensive visit (28 September to 02 October 2019) to Washington DC, his first visit to Washington after his appointment as Minister for External Affairs of [...]

          

Khashoggi After a Year   

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David Dreier at The Hill:
One year ago, Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi was murdered in the Saudi Arabian consulate in Turkey. He was working for the Washington Post because he was in exile from his Saudi Arabia. He was a vigorous advocate for openness, accountability, and transparency. He used his platform to urge the Saudi leadership to embrace these important values and was assassinated by their agents as a result.
Khashoggi knew that using his voice in this way carried risks. He nevertheless pushed for democratic reforms in Saudi Arabia. His commitment to democracy aligned him with a foundational element of our democracy here in the United States, which is a free and independent press. In the year since his murder, his legacy has become even more profound.
A commitment to openness, accountability, and transparency is a hallmark of journalism. These principles deserve to be memorialized in a permanent way. The Fallen Journalists Memorial Foundation was recently launched to build a memorial in Washington so that we never forget Khashoggi and others like him. The memorial will not include any names. Instead, it will be a testament to the commitment shared by journalists to the values of democracy all over the world.

          

Effetti collaterali di un #Atac in crisi: A #Roma si perdono 254 ore annue al volate   

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n una città dominata dalle macchine, dove il trasporto pubblico è poco attraente, fa perdere ai suoi cittadini ben 254 ore all'anno al volante, seconda solo a Bogotà. Serve una rivoluzione, ogni giorno che passa il disastro si avvicina "In termini di ore perse nella congestione del traffico" la lista è dominata dalle città europee. Nella top ten della classifica in questione queste sono 8 su 10. In testa c'è Mosca, seguita da Istanbul, Bogotà, Città del Messico e San Paolo. Londra è sesta seguita da Rio de Janeiro, Boston e San Pietroburgo. Gli Stati Uniti per il traffico spendono 87 miliardi di dollari l'anno. Secondo i calcoli di Cnbc, si tratta di circa 1.348 dollari a guidatore. Sempre per lo studio INRIX, Boston, Washington e Chicago sono le tre peggiori città d'America per le ore perse annualmente dai guidatori al volante. Sono 164 le ore, poco meno di una settimana, che a Boston gli automobilisti trascorrono al volante.

FONTE  »  roma trasporto pubblico
Effetti collaterali di un #Atac in crisi: A #Roma si perdono 254 ore annue al volate

          

Trump impeachment: US truck drivers give their view   

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US truck drivers share their opinions on the president and impeachment at a protest in Washington DC.

          

Proud Boy 'Tiny' Toese Pleads 'Not Guilty' to 2018 Assault   

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by Alex Zielinski
Toese at Mondays arraignment hearing.
Toese at Monday's arraignment hearing. Jim Ryan / The Oregonian

Tusitala "Tiny" Toese made his first court appearance Monday morning, six months after leaving the county to avoid arrest for a 2018 assault.

Toese is an avowed member of the Proud Boys—the national alt-right group—and Patriot Prayer—the cadre of far-right agitators based in Vancouver, WA. Toese, 22, has been a violent staple in Portland's alt-right protest scene over the past few years—and he's got a criminal record to match it. In June 2018, Toese was arrested for allegedly hopping out of a truck and, with the assistance of fellow Proud Boy Donovon Flippo, punching Portlander Tim Ledwidth.

Toese and Flippo were indicted in February 2019. While Flippo pled guilty and served eight days in jail, Toese fled Washington for American Samoa. He didn't return until Friday, October 4.

Toese was met at the Portland International Airport by law enforcement around 10:30 pm Friday. He was released on bail later that night.

At Monday's arraignment hearing, Toese pled not guilty to two charges—assault in the third and fourth degrees. County Circuit Court Judge Ryan Thomas told Toese he was prohibited from interacting with both Ledwidth and Flippo while the case played out. Ledwidth attended the morning's hearing, sitting quietly in the courtroom's back row.

Toese was also ordered to remain in Clark County, WA. He will next appear in court for a pre-trial hearing on November 25.

Outside the courtroom, Toese told reporters that it felt "good" to be back in Portland and rattled off a Proud Boy screed with a smile: "I’m a proud western chauvinist and I refuse to apologize for creating the modern world.”

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