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(Vermont) Taurus G2c 9mm - $ 230   

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Jason - Jay's Gun Shop in Bristol.
Brand new in the box Taurus G2c 9mm
 
Must be at least 21 and pass background check to purchase.
total out the door $230.00
 
BARREL LENGTH IN INCHES 3.2000
CALIBER 9MM LUGER
DRILLED AND TAPPED N
FINISH BLUED
FRAME MATERIAL POLYMER
GRIP MATERIAL POLYMER
MAGAZINE CAPACITY 12.0000
NUMBER OF MAGAZINES INCLUDED 2.0000
TYPE ACTION FUNCTION SEMI-AUTO
TYPE OF SIGHTS ADJUSTABLE
WEIGHT IN OUNCES 22.0000
NO SALE TO CALIFORNIA NO SALE TO CALIFORNIA
Dimension 1.95 X 6.20 X 9.85
HEIGHT 1.9500
WIDTH 6.2000
LENGTH 9.8500
FRAME COLOR BLACK
SLIDE COLOR BLACK

          

Paying ‘student’ athletes just entrenches the fraud of college sports   

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Regarding Sally Jenkins’s Oct. 2 Sports column, “California law doesn’t take from the NCAA. It keeps athletes from being robbed.”: If anything, in many cases, it is the supporters of the colleges...

          

California is making the NCAA extremely angry. Good.   

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A forthcoming law will allow college athletes to earn money from endorsements.

          

Top Ten Songs From The Dils   

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The Dils (1977 - 1980, 2019 - present) were amongst the first wave of punk bands from Southern California but later relocated to San Francisco California. The core of the band are brothers Chip and Tony Kinmen. Tony passed away in 2018 (R.I.P.) however Chip revived the band with his step-son on bass. I actually saw this revived version back in May and they were great.

          

Al via a Los Angeles la seconda edizione della Vegan fashion week   

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Al via la seconda edizione della Vegan fashion week. In agenda dal 10 al 15 ottobre, a Los Angeles, la kermesse dedicata a marchi vegani, ospita anche conferenze a tema e una fiera. L'evento in scena al California Market Center.

La seconda edizione della Vegan fashion week si svolge dal 10 al 15 ottobre

Per accedere è necessario acquistare i biglietti. Ci sono diverse formule: per esempio il biglietto per due giorni va dai 40 a 120 dollari (a seconda dei posti scelti per sfilate e conferenze), mentre quello per la serata di gala di apertura costa 20 dollari.

Tra i marchi vegani presenti figurano Mayd In Chyna, Malaika New York, Minttu Melasalmi, Plural, Glancez.

La Vegan fashion week è stata fondata da Emmanuelle Rienda

La kermesse, la cui prima edizione si è svolta lo scorso febbraio, è stata fondata da Emmanuelle Rienda direttore creativo e attivista per i diritti degli animali nata a Clermont-Ferrand, in Francia, nel 1983. Dopo essersi trasferita negli Stati Uniti nel 2008, Rienda ha aperto Le Frenchlab, un'agenzia creativa con sede a Los Angeles che rappresenta i designer francesi sul mercato americano. Nel 2016, il suo amore per gli animali l'ha portata ad adottare uno stile di vita vegano e ha deciso di smettere di promuovere l'uso di pelle, lana, pelli esotiche, piume e pellicce su riviste o boutique per conto dei designer.

Da lì a breve è entrata in contatto con stilisti e designer tessili vegani, che hanno ampliato la sua visione l'hanno portata a lanciare la serie di conferenze The Future of fashion, che riunisce leader e sostenitori della moda sostenibile per discutere di alternative intelligenti, etiche e all'avanguardia.

Forte di questa esperienza positiva, Rienda ha deciso di lanciare la Vegan fashion week, il cui manifesto parla di una rivoluzione della moda etica che cambia l'industria e celebra creativi che abbracciano pratiche cruelty free.

Rienda: "il apporto tra moda, agricoltura industriale e cambiamento climatico non può essere ignorato"

Dopo la prima edizione dello scorso febbraio, quindi, torna a Los Angeles la Vegan fashion week. "Il rapporto tra moda, agricoltura industriale e cambiamento climatico non può essere ignorato. La moda sostenibile vegetariana è la risposta definitiva al cambiamento climatico e all'inquinamento da rifiuti. Ho creato un movimento inclusivo e collaborativo dedicato a ridisegnare l'industria e le abitudini quotidiane dei consumatori", ha affermato Emmanuelle Rienda. "Questa è un'ode creativa alla fine dello sfruttamento degli animali e una celebrazione dell'evoluzione umana".

Il 14 e 15 ottobre, inoltre, la kermesse darà la possibilità di scambiare (dall'americano swap, un sistema di baratto, anche per gli abiti, che sta prendendo all'estero e in Italia) i capi in pelle o le pellicce con abbigliamento vegano.I capi non vegani saranno dati in beneficenza.

Foto: Emmanuelle Renda, Vegan fashion week website

          

A Grip on Sports: Every sport seems to have some sort of presence in October, which makes weekends pretty fun   

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A GRIP ON SPORTS • A weird confluence of American sporting events occurred over the weekend and you might not even have noticed it. Just call it the overlap weekend and move on.

•••••••

• Winter may be the season of ice and snow, spring of rebirth and summer of the lazy day, but fall? Fall is special. It’s when everything in the sporting world intersects.

It’s hard to think of a better example than yesterday.

The NFL dominated, of course, as it would no matter which of the 52 Sundays it is. But it wasn’t alone on the stage.

The MLS held its final competitions of the regular season, deciding which teams would make the playoffs and where they would be slotted. All the games were played at the same time, forcing fans to continually check scores in the afternoon hours.

The NBA continued its preseason preparations, which included an international incident of some import.

The NHL season is underway, with the regular season just a prelude to one of the best playoffs in all professional sports. Unless, you know, your team is based in Canada.

Golf is actually in the midst of the 2020 season, even as we wait for the Presidents Cup to fill our team match-play competition desire before 2019 hits the 19th hole.

And baseball? It’s rolling toward its finale, as summer held on in the Eastern part of the nation and the Nationals bullpen couldn’t hold off the Dodgers.

No matter which sport you love beyond all others, be it boxing, horse racing, college hoops or even tennis, there was something going on in the weekend just past. And not just some always some exhibition, even though, as Kansas’ basketball program discovered, too much of that can cause problems.

Yesterday, for example, we sat in front of the TV for a couple hours and watched, in order of excitement, the RedZone, baseball playoffs, a soccer match from Portland and Kevin Na make a whole bunch of long putts.

It was the Granny’s Buffet of sports. And it was all you could consume.

• What’s ahead this week?

Well, baseball continues its playoffs, with the Braves and Dodgers seemingly headed toward a National League showdown reminiscent of the 1980s, and the Yankees and Astros, both winners of 100-plus games, doing the same in the American League.

College football features a whole bunch of big games Saturday, including what was once the greatest intersectional rivalry in sports (USC vs. Notre Dame). The Cougars also return to the field with a new man (or men) in charge of their defense.

The NFL continues its regular season, as the Seahawks prepare to play the Cleveland Browns (and I read up on the correct way to grill a kielbasa). Will this be the week Russell Wilson finally throws an interception and the national pundits can declare him “overrated?”

Winter may be just around the next bend but, for a while at least, we can forget about it. Our thoughts can be on the smorgasbord of sports we have to consume. What a great way to fatten up for the cold ahead.  

•••

WSU: Not a lot in the football arena today, but the soccer team did score a big win in the Bay Area on a golden goal. … Elsewhere in the Pac-12 and around the nation, there are a whole bunch of teams still undefeated after five weeks of the football season. They all have made their way near the top of the Associated Press Top 25. … Washington’s passing offense seems to have stalled recently. How did that happen? … Oregon State’s offense seems to be on fire, though it’s hard to tell after the Beavers just played a woeful UCLAdefense. We will know more after they play Utah this weekend. The 15th-ranked Utes are coming off a bye. … Don’t expect Chip Kelly to quit. … Oregon may have struggled a bit against California, but everyone does. … Arizona is atop the South Division standings. That is all. … USC travels to South Bend this weekend.

Gonzaga: Mark Few spoke out last week concerning the California legislature’s interjecting itself into the likeness and image discussion. As we reported, he wasn’t too happy with the “help.” He expounded on that a bit Saturday and his thoughts are part of this Justin Reed story. … Seth Davis came to Spokane recently and had a meal at Jack and Dan's. Ya, that's what he had there. More importantly, he spoke with a bunch of former Gonzaga players about the past – and the present.

Chiefs: Everett figured out a way to slow what had been a potent Spokane offense and it resulted in a 4-3 Silvertips win last night at the Arena. Kevin Dudley was there and has this coverage. Libby Kamrowski also has a photo gallery.

Seahawks: The trade deadline looms, but getting Jarran Reed back will be a bigger deal.

Sounders:Roman Torres returned from his suspension and scored the only goal in a 1-0 win over Minnesota. The victory locked up second in the West for Seattle. … Portland won 3-1 and earned a playoff berth. … Real Salt Lake picked up a victory that moved into third in the West.

•••       

• Once, a long time ago, my father-in-law came up for a visit. He brought his tools with him. Nice man. He and I were doing some work in the back of the house. He was disgusted with my inability to complete many of what he considered simple tasks. I get it. My skills in that regard were – and are – limited. His were spectacular. Finally, he turned to me and said something I still remember today, some 25 years later. “If I had known (Kim) was going to marry someone like you, I would have taught her more.” I’m thinking of that today as a contractor comes out to my home to fix things I should be able to. At least I’m pretty good at writing a check. Until later …


          

Gonzaga coach Mark Few joins discussion of new California law   

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A new, controversial piece of legislation out of California sent the college basketball world into a frenzy over the past week.

California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law SB206, which would allow college athletes to gain compensations for their likeness. In essence, it makes it illegal for California colleges to disallow their student-athletes from profiting off themselves and allows agents to be hired to help promote them – both of which has been strictly prohibited by the NCAA.

There has been similar legislation introduced in other states, but the Golden State was the first to enact a game-altering change.

It doesn’t go into effect until January 1, 2023, but the result has sparked reactions from all over the college landscape.

Most of the reactions have been centered around money. Earlier this week, Gonzaga athletic director Mike Roth agreed that student-athletes deserve more than what is currently available to them.

Gonzaga men’s basketball head coach Mark Few was asked about it at the West Coast Conference tip-off event in Las Vegas and didn’t pull any punches, calling the law a publicity stunt by grandstanding politicians.

On Saturday, Few expanded on those thoughts and said the NCAA has been working on a solution for a while.

“We were already on it,” he said. “That doesn’t seem to be written about much. We already had a committee working on it, and some really good people and some smart people, and I think they are going to announce some things in a little bit. It is the kind of the world we live in; everyone just lashes out early and everybody reacts.”

In the few days since the new law was signed, the sports and political landscapes collided as everyone wanted to offer their opinion – from inside and outside the NCAA.

“I think everybody is kind of moving really fast on it,” Few said. “But I think there will be some really smart people, practitioners, day to day in our sport who can make some solid decisions and not get influenced by people outside of our profession chirping in.”

Few wanted to make it clear, as did Roth, that he is for some sort of compensation plan, but there have to be logical safeguards in place.

“I am hoping some good things come about from it. I am certainly all for it as long as we can have some sort of plan, some ways to easily regulate it,” Few said. “You have to take your time and look at the effect. You don’t just enact things and go from there; that usually leads to a disaster.”

Checking with student-athletes within the GU men’s locker room, the overall thought was yes, compensation should be made available to them, but no one knew exactly what that should entail.

Junior forward Corey Kispert was happy to see the news, hoping that it jump-starts the movement so changes can be enacted sooner rather than later.

“It is pretty exciting for me, to see states take steps toward treatment of athletes, and I think that is a good thing,” he said. “I think it is progressive, and I think they are making steps in the right direction. I think a lot of people are jumping the gun a little bit and are talking when they don’t really know what’s going, on and that’s why I am keeping my mouth shut about it.”

Assistant coach Brian Michaelson has a unique perspective. He was a student-athlete within the past 15 years, and now is a coach of student-athletes. Laws haven’t changed much since he was a player. He, too, thinks players should get a piece of the pie, but there needs to be a nuanced approach.

“It is going to be a long process, and I definitely think that student-athletes deserve all of the benefits they can get, but there are just too many things logistically on where that is going to go, and how you do it, that we just need to be patient and take a big step back, and kind of wait for it play out a little bit,” he said.


          

Clean jerseys of wide receivers spell trouble for Huskies’ passing game   

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STANFORD, Calif. – The Washington Huskies’ passing game is broken.

That fact was evident at 10:48 on Saturday night as Chris Petersen’s Huskies trudged in a sad procession toward the southeast tunnel at Stanford Stadium. As they did, the public address announcer boomed, “When the eastern part of the country wakes up in the morning, they’ll see the final score: Stanford 23, Washington 13!”

Senior wide receiver Aaron Fuller walked with his helmet on, head down, his once-white jersey now stained various shades of green and red. The jersey, in this case, was a visual receipt; it spoke silently, but unmistakably, reflecting Fuller’s substantial role in the Husky offense.

Terrell Bynum’s jersey was clean. Andre Baccellia’s jersey was clean. Quinten Pounds’ jersey was clean. Marquis Spiker’s jersey was clean. Austin Osborne’s jersey was clean. Puka Nacua’s jersey was clean.

They either didn’t receive an opportunity, or failed to take advantage when they did.

Indeed, the 5-foot-11, 188-pound Fuller was targeted a whopping 17 times Saturday night, and turned in nine catches (and at least three drops) for 171 yards, with a long of 37.

Otherwise, UW’s remaining wide receivers combined for an utterly incompetent two catches for 10 yards … which all came in the fourth quarter. No other Husky pass-catcher was targeted more than five times on the night. Junior tight end Hunter Bryant caught just one pass for 8 yards and dropped a pair of passes that would have extended drives on third down.

Junior quarterback Jacob Eason, meanwhile, completed all five of his pass attempts for 56 yards and a touchdown in his team’s torrid opening drive. He completed 11 of 31 passes for 150 yards and an interception, while being sacked twice, the rest of the way.

It’s been written before, but bears repeating: entering the game, Stanford’s defense ranked 127th nationally in opponent completion percentage (70.6), 126th in opponent pass efficiency rating (170.60), 124th in opponent yards per attempt (9.4), 115th in passing defense (287.4 yards a game) and 111th in touchdown passes allowed (11).

So how did this happen? Or, as Petersen was asked in the postgame news conference, “What needs to change to get the passing game going?”

“That’s a good question. That’s a good question,” he repeated. “(There were) dropped balls, and we’ve got to give our quarterback more answers, too. I know a couple times he was standing back there without answers.

“But you couple that with little protection stuff and he’s running around, and a couple guys didn’t make plays for him. And when you’re not going to get the ball a bunch, you better capitalize.”

Here’s what not-getting-the-ball-a-bunch looks like: Baccellia, UW’s senior starter opposite Fuller, has excelled in three nonconference games – posting 13 catches for 195 and two touchdowns.

But in three games against Pac-12 competition, he has been rendered utterly ineffective, managing just six catches – two per game – for 41 yards. Still, the coaching staff has (perhaps stubbornly) stuck with him. Saturday, he contributed one essentially irrelevant catch for a single yard on five targets.

Senior wide receiver Chico McClatcher, meanwhile, has not caught a pass since the 52-20 victory over Hawaii on Sept. 14. Nacua – a 6-1, 204-pound former four-star freshman – has been targeted a grand total of one time this season, and he turned that target into a picturesque 28-yard touchdown. And it’s not that Puka isn’t playing, either; the highly touted freshman receiver just rarely runs a route. Most often, he enters the game, blocks for a running play and then immediately exits again. This begs the obvious question: they burned his redshirt so he could block?

As for the trio of talented former four-star redshirt freshmen, Austin Osborne has recorded one catch for minus-2 yards this season. Spiker – who holds the California state prep record with 72 receiving touchdowns – has played in three games without earning a target, and 182-pound speedster Trey Lowe has been sidelined for the first six games with an infection.

Petersen often has repeated that those who practice most consistently will earn opportunities in games. But, if Fuller and Baccellia are so much better than everybody else, isn’t that also an issue? If players as presumably talented as Nacua, Osborne and Spiker all can’t earn a target in a lopsided 10-point defeat, who’s really to blame?

When asked if UW’s pass game woes can be traced to personnel and an inability to get open, Petersen said, “I think it’s everything. We’ll look at the tape there. But like I said, I know a couple times we’ve just got to cut our losses. (Eason) threw a couple good balls in there that we didn’t make plays on. We’ve got do a better job, there’s no question, in the pass game.”

In three nonconference games, Eason has completed 77.5% of his passes, throwing for 901 yards and 10 touchdowns with one interception (while being sacked just once).

Meanwhile, in three Pac-12 contests, the former Lake Stevens High School standout has completed just 54.3% of his passes, throwing for 548 yards with one touchdown and two interceptions (while being sacked seven times).

In Eason, Washington touts perhaps the Pac-12’s (and the nation’s?) most physically talented passer. And yet the Huskies rank sixth in the conference in passing touchdowns (11), seventh in completion percentage (65.8), eighth in yards per attempt (8.1) and pass efficiency rating (150.4) and ninth in passing offense (248.8 yards a game).

Too often, Eason has stood in the backfield without any answers. Perhaps that’s play-calling. Perhaps it’s personnel, or coaching, or preparation, or all of the above. With UW’s next three Pac-12 games coming against 4-1 Arizona, 4-1 Oregon and 4-1 Utah, Petersen and Co., have precious little time to improve their suddenly incompetent passing attack.

The Huskies’ jerseys were clean on Saturday night.

Their execution was anything but.


          

A Grip on Sports: Young Zags and an old story highlight a Cougar-less Saturday   

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A GRIP ON SPORTS • It’s a rare fall Saturday the past couple decades in which we haven’t had to work. Which opened an almost unlimited vista of opportunities on a clear, crisp day. We stayed (or went) inside. But that doesn’t mean we didn’t watch sports. And learn some things.

•••••••

• Thanks to a family friend, Kim and I were able to attend the Kraziness in the Kennel with some VIP perks. What does that mean? Our line was shorter, we got to mingle and watch TV, enjoy a cold beverage – don’t worry, I had diet soda – and sit in decent seats.

Oh, and catch up with some old friends, which is always nice. Then find out the oldest of Gonzaga’s friendly men’s basketball players is out again, though Mark Few wouldn’t term Killian Tillie’s absence Saturday injury-based. Sure, Tillie had surgery again, but it was preventative, sort of like why we take a cholesterol pill every night.

We do it to make sure there are no problems down the road.

As John Blanchette points out in his column this morning, that would go down easier with the Zag faithful if it applied to anyone other than Tillie, the most snakebit player Gonzaga has had since at least Josh Heytvelt.

The guy sitting in front of me sure had a lot to say about that, none of it positive. His response to the news of Tillie's surgery seemed a little out of proportion, venom-wise. And we thought GU fans were more of the nurturing, loving type.

Few is going to have to be a bit more nurturing and loving this season, that’s for sure. All but three players on the court yesterday afternoon were new to the roster (four when you count Tillie). Two are senior transfers (Admon Gilder and Ryan Gilder, both guards and both players who will contribute). The rest are freshmen.

Six of them.

Do they have talent? Of course they do. They wouldn’t be at GU if they didn’t. But nothing can make them older except time, practice and a tough non-conference schedule.

The Zags will scrimmage with Michigan State, a lot of folks’ pick to win the NCAA title. They will play at Texas A&M, Gilder’s old school. They will face quality in the Bahamas at a Thanksgiving tournament. They play at Washington and Arizona, two of the Pac-12’s better teams, in December. And they host North Carolina, the bluest of blue bloods.

No wonder Few told the crowd it would play a bigger-than-usual role in helping his team this season.

Their voices and support won’t help, though, as much as the passage of time.

• There is one nice perk when the Pac-12 team you follow (in my case, for work) has a bye. You get to focus on the conference’s other games. Sometimes that isn’t good.

If you happened to watch Stanford’s upset of Washington (and I did) last night, you were able to experience a little of why the conference has such a poor reputation concerning its officiating.

Sorry to go there, but there were so many little things done poorly, it undermines the fans’ confidence the conference’s representatives will get the big things right.

Case in point, a first-half punt. What happened seems minor, but it isn’t. Mainly because it was so embarrassing.

With time running down in the half and Stanford hoping to extend a 13-10 lead, the Huskies’ Joel Whitford uncorked a line-drive punt. It was so short it hit a Washington player in the leg at the Stanford 27-yard line, then kicked forward and rolled dead at the 10.

Everyone in the stadium knew it happened, including the officials and the ESPN announcers. What the former group didn’t know, however, was exactly where. Those of us at home did – as should of the folks in the replay booth. All we (and they) had to do was hit one button on the remote to see. It was the 27. That’s where the ball should have been marked. It wasn’t. When referee Kevin Mar came on our screen to explain, he told us about the touching and where it occurred. He said the 20-yard line, a point at which the ball had been rolling free. He and his crew were wrong.

This is what replay is meant for. The clock is stopped, the mistake is obvious. Buzz down and fix it. Nope. The ball stayed at the 20. Thousand of people watching at home, including the folks in charge of the conference’s officiating and those in charge of its image, knew it was wrong. Fix it. Nope. The ball stayed at the 20.

By the way, those seven yards may have ultimately cost Stanford a shot at a long Jet Toner field goal attempt. We will never know. But we do know the Cardinal didn’t start their possession in the right spot.

•••

WSU: Even though Theo Lawson was enjoying the bye week by celebrating friends’ nuptials (hey, he put his plans on Twitter, so I don’t feel bad sharing), he still talked with Mike Leach and let the Cougar coach enlighten us on defensive coordinator Tracy Claeys’ departure. Though Leach’s comments didn’t shed a whole lot of light on the change. …The letters to the editor on Leach's comments following the Utah loss were mixed in nature. … Elsewhere in the Pac-12, the standings seem a bit upside down right now. … Stanford controlled the line of scrimmage, made plays when it had to and ultimately held off Washington in the upset of the day. The Huskies never found their rhythm in the loss. … California shut outOregon for a half, then the Ducks asserted themselves to gain a tight home win. The Bears' lack of offense cost them in the end. … The Arizona offense came alive behind a healthyKhalil Tate and the Wildcats won in Colorado. The Buffs might be better than their record, however. They certainly are beat up. … UCLAcertainly isn't all that good. The Bruins looked poor again as Oregon State went into the Rose Bowl and outscoredthe host team, adding to Chip Kelly's woes. … The college athletic model will change.

Gonzaga: The Kraziness in the Kennel was just that, especially in the way the Gonzaga students went out of their way to make a quartet of recruits feel wanted (Justin Reed has a story). Besides the Killie injury (as we said, covered in John’s column), the news was a nearly new roster for the Zags. In Mark Few’s years on campus there has probably a season with more turnover – after more than three decades as an assistant and a head coach, it’s hard to imagine anything new – but we can’t think of one. Jim covers that aspect of the day. … Jim has another story as he passed along the news freshman Oumar Ballo, the most physically impressive player on the court, is still waiting for the NCAA to rule on his eligibility. … Jesse Tinsley braved the crowds of cameras for the best shots in this photo gallery.

EWU: Our Ryan Collingwood was in Sacramento, probably to catch up with his yearly quota of In-N-Out, but also to cover the game. He has this story. … Around the Big Sky,

Idaho: A week after dropping a road game to woeful Northern Colorado – the Bears are 1-5 after losing at Northern Arizona yesterday – the Vandals looked like a Big Sky contender again Saturday. But fourth-ranked Weber State was able to hold on for 41-35 win in the Kibbie Dome. Peter Harriman has the coverage.

Whitworth: The Pirates finally played at home Saturday and my, how did they play. How does winning 82-7 sound? Dan Thompson was at the Pine Bowl and has this game story.

Preps: There was one football game left over from Friday night, pushed back to Saturday after some lightning around Albi Stadium. The was some lightning yesterday, but it was all confined to the playing surface and most of it supplied by Lewis and Clark’s Keani Guthmueller. Dave Nichols was there and he has this story on LC’s 43-36 win over Post Falls. … Gonzaga Prep wing Liam Lloyd announced his college commitment yesterday, going on social media to tell everyone he will be playing at Grand Canyon College. Dave has a story on that as well. … Mead golfer Matt Jones was under par last weekend in an event at Pebble Beach. That news is part of our local briefs.

Chiefs: Spokane’s offense stayed hot, rolling Tri-City 7-1 last night in Kennewick.

Seahawks: No game today. Isn't that odd? Let's look ahead instead.

•••       

• Because Kim and I were out and about yesterday, I didn’t get anything I wanted done. Which means my Sunday will be busy. At least the sun will be out and  temperature is going to be in the high 50s today, making the mowing and raking and fertilizing a little more enjoyable. Until later …


          

Sacramento State racks up 471 yards of offense, upsets No. 22 Eastern Washington 48-27   

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SACRAMENTO, California – A towel on his head and hands on his face, Eastern Washington quarterback Eric Barriere appeared dejected as he sat alone on the Hornet Stadium bench midway through the second quarter.

Barriere was shelved for portions of the second and third quarters after being looked at by trainers for an unspecified injury, but Sacramento State had already established a two-touchdown lead before his initial exit, including a Barriere interception that turned into a 27-yard scoring return.

When the Walter Payton Award candidate returned after a few fruitless drives with backup Gunner Talkington, the Eagles regained their pulse, pulling within a possession of the resurgent Hornets, who then had a clock-eating touchdown drive for a 41-27 lead.

George Obinna then proceeded to add an exclamation point.

Sacramento State’s star defensive end picked up a Barriere fumble in the final 2 minutes and rumbled 73 yards for the Hornets’ in a convincing 48-27 upset of the swooning Eagles.

The Hornets (3-2, 1-0 Big Sky) totaled 471 yards against EWU, their first home win over the Eagles in program history.

The Eagles (2-4, 1-1) were picked to win the Big Sky and were ranked as high as No. 4 in the preseason. With five games remaining, they will likely have to win out for a chance at a playoff berth or a possible share of the title.

EWU offensive tackle Chris Schlichting held back emotion as he voiced his frustration over the loss and the program’s worst start since 2011.

“We have potential All-Americans all throughout that locker room, we have dudes who know what they’re doing, so this is just hard,” Schlichting said. “Especially since you want to win for the fans and win for this university, then you do stuff like this.”

Sacramento State, led by former EWU offensive coordinator Troy Taylor, was also menacing on defense.

Leading the Big Sky in fewest points allowed heading into the game, Sacramento State piled up seven sacks in its first win over an Football Championship Subdivision Top 25 team since 2012.

Hornets quarterback Kevin Thomson orchestrated a lengthy, 13-play touchdown drive in the fourth quarter to make it 41-27 with 6:16 remaining that took away the Eagles’ momentum.

Thomson, an Auburn, Washington, native, passed for 315 yards and three touchdowns, helping the Hornets jump out to an early 21-7 lead. He wasn’t sacked.

Elijah Dotson also frustrated the Eagles with 103 rushing yards.

The typically downtrodden Hornets have also shut out Northern Colorado 50-0 and gave brawny Football Bowl Subdivision foes Arizona State (19-7 loss) and Fresno State (34-20 loss) fits.

“We came in with the expectation to win the game, and nobody blinked,” said Taylor, an offensive coordinator at EWU in 2016. “Everyone bought it and it’s nice to see them rewarded with a big win.”

EWU came out hot, though.

The Eagles scored on the game’s opening possession, a 12-play drive capped by Barriere’s 7-yard touchdown pass to Talolo Limu-Jones.

When Barriere left in the second quarter with his team trailing, the Eagles were ineffective. Talkington struggled through a series of three-and-out drives, completing 2 of 11 passes for 27 yards, and was sacked twice.

“We’re depleted, but so what – that’s not an excuse,” EWU coach Aaron Best said. “We’re not good enough in some areas. We aren’t disciplined enough in areas. We don’t make enough plays in areas and we hold too much on offense.”

Barriere completed 22 of 42 passes for 309 yards, two touchdowns an interception and rushed for 103 yards and a touchdown on 12 carries, a statistic boosted by a 92-yard touchdown run in the first half.

“He was shifty, hard to tackle,” Obinna said of Barriere. “Every time he ran out of the pocket, it was an extra effort. But just trusting everyone to do their job is what it came down to.”

EWU’s Jayson Williams hauled in seven passes for 129 yards a touchdown and Dehonta Hayes and a game-high 17 tackles. Hayes was also ejected for a late targeting penalty.


          

News for Tonight’s WWE RAW Episode from Bakersfield   

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Tonight’s WWE RAW will take place from the Rabobank Arena in Bakersfield, California with fallout from last night’s Hell In a Cell pay-per-view. WWE has announced that pro boxer Tyson Fury will be on tonight’s RAW to further the new feud with Braun Strowman. The only match announced for tonight’s RAW is a Last Woman […]

          

2013 Malibu Lagoon Restoration Declared a Success   

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Malibu Times – September 27, 2019 From 2012-13, the 31-acre Malibu Lagoon underwent a nine-month-long restoration process initiated by California State Parks. Twelve acres of wetland near the mouth of Malibu Creek were drained, wildlife was trapped and relocated, heavy equipment scooped out a thousand tons of trash and fill, channels and bridges were removed, […]

The post 2013 Malibu Lagoon Restoration Declared a Success appeared first on The Bay Foundation.


          

Research, Fall 2019   

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Watch this clip from The Wire.  It is the best description of research, ever.

The Internet Archive -- if there is a broken link to what you need, this site might help you find it.  (A morbid example here: https://God.blue/splash.php?url=IIg3ivGQ3UYZT3_SLASH_e0wbt8b1myLRJBrACMrIMG_SLASH_BeYq_SLASH_vkzsdGO_SLASH_YixJOgFku0Q2GUo66dgJdvFaXKhFr2gYiWsIBZgb34UJrWIKgP6h_SLASH_kQSS5S8N34yjSIVYZNba4Fy81zTDF1a9_PLUS__SLASH_R4pGF361aJKDCj9hwO2ohsOVoukTBXu_SLASH_4_EQUALS_)

Great stuff at Honnold Library -- which students usually overlook! (password required)
  • Nexis Uni:  news sources and law journals
  • Political science journals
  • Dissertation abstracts (search for "California" and "redistricting" in abstracts, and you will see a couple of Rose Institute names)
General Statistics and The Census

California and General State Politics
Elections, Parties, Campaign Finance

          

Per Diem Surgery Technician - Acuity Eye Group - Lancaster, CA   

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Current certification by the California Certified Surgical Technician Board preferred. Current Basic Life Support (BLS) certification.
From Indeed - Fri, 04 Oct 2019 19:00:17 GMT - View all Lancaster, CA jobs

          

Per Diem Medical Assistant - Acuity Eye Group - Lancaster, CA   

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Current certification by the California Certifying Board for Medical Assistants. Current Basic Life Support (BLS) certification.
From Indeed - Thu, 03 Oct 2019 23:59:56 GMT - View all Lancaster, CA jobs

          

USDA, Cooperative Extension, & APLU Award Top Honors in Extension Excellence and Diversity   

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Contact:
APLU: Jeff Lieberson, (202) 478-6073
USDA-NIFA: William Hoffman, (202) 401-1112
Cooperative Extension: Sandy Ruble, (202) 478-6088

WASHINGTON, October 7, 2019 – Recognizing visionary leadership and diversity in educational programming, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), Cooperative Extension, and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) today announced that Matthew Devereaux, of the University of Tennessee, will receive the 2019 Excellence in Extension Award, and two Iowa State University-led teams, will receive the National Extension Diversity Award. Both awards, along with Regional Excellence in Extension Awards, will be presented at a ceremony on Nov. 10 in San Diego, California during APLU’s 132nd Annual Meeting. NIFA and Cooperative Extension have sponsored the awards since 1991.

“NIFA is proud to support the national network of extension experts and educators through our land-grant institution partnership,” said NIFA Director J. Scott Angle. “This collaboration brings science-based knowledge to farmers, ranchers and community members to help them grow their businesses, raise healthy families and support their communities.”

“We applaud this year’s Excellence in Extension and National Extension Diversity Awards winners,” said Ed Jones, Associate Dean and Director of Extension, Virginia Tech, and Chair of the Extension Committee on Organization and Policy. “Their work stands as an exceptional example of the impact of Cooperative Extension for the people in all 50 states and five U.S. territories where more than 32,000 Cooperative Extension professionals serve.”

National Excellence in Extension Award The Excellence in Extension Award is given annually to one Cooperative Extension professional who excels at programming, provides visionary leadership and makes a positive impact on constituents served.

Matthew Devereaux is Interim Assistant Dean and Department Head for Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Tennessee Extension. Much of Devereaux’s work has centered on developing innovative and highly impactful youth programs. Specifically, his research has focused on best practices for positively developing youth in afterschool settings.

His findings show the importance of focusing heavily on a student’s social/emotional development during the beginning of the school year to improve learning as the year progresses. Devereaux’s research has shown students have greater gains in grades and standardized test scores when incorporating significant social/emotional learning programming that teaches students how to recognize, understand, label, express and regulate emotions. He’s also focusing on developing resources on adverse childhood experiences (ACES), mindfulness, quality childcare and early brain development. He’s aiming to examine the impact of positive fathering in future research.

National Diversity in Extension Award The National Diversity Award recognizes significant contributions and accomplishments in achieving and sustaining diversity and pluralism.

Kimberly Greder, Professor of Human Sciences Extension and Outreach Family Life Specialist, leads efforts in Iowa to implement and evaluate extension programs to reduce educational and health disparities facing Latino families. Using Juntos Para Una Mejor Educación (Together for a Better Education), Greder and her teams helped 1,300 Latino youth and parents gain information, develop skills, access resources and broaden networks to help youth identify paths to post-secondary education.

In partnership with the University of Illinois, Iowa faculty engaged 262 parents and children of Mexican heritage in an extension research study focused on testing the efficacy of Abriendo Caminos, a curriculum designed to promote healthy lifestyles and reduce obesity risk. Preliminary findings revealed that families who participated had larger increases in good cholesterol levels, and larger decreases in bad cholesterol and blood inflammation, suggesting improved lifestyle behaviors reducing obesity risk. These efforts led to significant strides in expanding extension’s capacity to engage with and provide responsive programming to Iowa Latino families.

Regional Awards NIFA, Cooperative Extension, and APLU will also present four regional awards for excellence this year. The 2019 Regional Excellence in Extension recipients are:

  • 1890 Institutions Region: Dorothy Brandon, Family and Finance Extension State Specialist at Alabama A&M University, for work to improve thousands of adults’ financial well-being.
  • North Central Region: Dianne Shoemaker, Extension Field Specialist, Dairy Production Economics and Associate Professor at The Ohio State University, for holistic farm business management education efforts that help dairy farms improve profitability and sustainability.
  • Northeast Region: Gordon Johnson, Assistant Professor and Fruits and Vegetables Extension Specialist at the University of Delaware, for work to address challenges facing fruit and vegetable producers in Delaware and the broader mid-Atlantic region.
  • Southern Region: Mark Peterson, Professor of Community and Economic Development with the Division of Agriculture at the University of Arkansas System, Cooperative Extension Service, for efforts to build vibrant, sustainable communities and regions through community leadership education programming and mentoring.
  • Western Region: Dave Schramm, Family Life Extension State Specialist, Human Development and Family Studies at Utah State University, for innovative, scholarly leadership of family life programs.

###

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

Date: 
October 7, 2019
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Group this content belongs to: 

          

PG&E could shut off power across Bay Area on Wednesday and Thursday - Berkeleyside   

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  1. PG&E could shut off power across Bay Area on Wednesday and Thursday  Berkeleyside
  2. PG&E Issues Power Shutoff Warning For Most Of Northern California Except SF  SFist
  3. PG&E Cuts Power as California Neighbors Struggle to Get Back on Their Feet After Wildfire  FOX40 News
  4. PG&E’s power shut-off watch for Northern California: Here’s what you need to know  San Francisco Chronicle
  5. PG&E may cut power to 30 counties for 'severe wind event'  SF Gate
  6. View full coverage on Google News

          

MOTIVE GEAR ZN1213 HELICAL GEAR THRUST BRG.   

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MOTIVE GEAR ZF47-40 S547 5-R HUB and SLIDER ONLY   

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