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Kuleto restaurants delayed, over budget   

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Pat Kuleto's two waterfront restaurants, WaterBar and Epic Roasthouse, have fallen two months and at least $2 million behind schedule, I reported in the Business Times on Friday (free link!).

Also, some of the ceilings are going to be pretty low (8 feet).

On the plus side: lots of outdoor terrace seating, high ceilings over the dining room, and both restaurants are pretty far along.

The project was already dropping jaws at its $18 million cost, now the cost is somewhere over $20 million.

          

Tony Bourdain keeping it real in Fruitvale   

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My friend Connie emailed to say Anthony Bourdain is chowing down in front of at least one of the famed taco trucks in the Fruitvale district of Oakland:

so i just sent zack on a taco run to our favorite
truck (mi grullense) and he just called saying that
tony bourdain was there (w/the contra costa times).
he's super tall and ordered the cabeza and the tripa.

cool, huh?

Very cool, but what would be even cooler is if Tony could convince one of those truck owners to publish "Taco Truck Confidential." SO much scarier than Kitchen Confidential.

(PS, maybe he found this place through nerdfury??)

          

City may ban hotel-condo conversions forever, approximately   

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No wonder St. Francis owner Laurence Geller is so obsessed with the city's hotel-condo conversion moratorium -- Board of Supervisors president Aaron Peskin wants to make the temporary, 18-month ban effectively permanent.

The SF Examiner reports that Peskin is proposing extending the ban for "at least a decade," but don't worry, you can get an exemption if you ask Aaron nicely.

And then ask the Planning Commission nicely.

And then ask the union officials, neighbors, activist groups and other Planning Commission lobbyists nicely.

Between this and recent developments in commercial finance, San Francisco hotels seem to be depreciating nicely.

Examiner: Supe aims to shield hotel rooms from condo conversions

          

Kroger, Walgreens to top selling e-cigarettes in U.S.   

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The vaping industry has come under scrutiny after hundreds of people have fallen ill and at least eight have died after using vaping devices.

          

Re: How is this portfolio—is it on the right track?   

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HomeStretch wrote:
Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:52 pm

Postergirl wrote:
Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:43 pm

How can I tell if they did the step-up cost basis properly? When I continued with the advisory, the account went from

all bonds to the allocation above. It was done by ML advisory.


If 100% of your Inherited holdings were sold and proceeds reinvested, the cost basis of the new holdings should be fine. It would apply to any inherited holdings still in your portfolio.



Good step moving away from the advisor.


That’s a relief, at least some good news :happy After I turn off the reinvesting as you instructed, I will look to transfer to

probably Vanguard for a much simpler set of funds.

          

Iraqi army withdraws from volatile Baghdad district in bid to restore calm   

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Iraq Protests

Clashes between Iraqi security forces and anti-government protesters killed at least 15 people in an eastern Baghdad neighbourhood overnight, police and medics said on Monday, raising the toll from nearly a week of violence to at least 110 people.


          

Man Utd Deny Rumours That Paul Pogba Is Holding Club to Ransom for Real Madrid Move   

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?Manchester United have dismissed rumours that Paul Pogba is holding the club to ransom in an attempt to force through a switch to Real Madrid. Los Blancos were reportedly desperate to recruit Pogba during the summer but met fierce resistance from United, who were unwilling to sell (at least for below their asking price) despite … Continue reading Man Utd Deny Rumours That Paul Pogba Is Holding Club to Ransom for Real Madrid Move

          

Content Writer - Evening Shift - ABS Technology - Karachi   

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We are looking for *Content Writer - Evening Shift*. Exceptional English writing & communication. Must have at least 1-years of demonstrable content writing…
From Indeed - Mon, 07 Oct 2019 19:20:23 GMT - View all Karachi jobs

          

‘The Simpsons’ Showrunner Al Jean on the Passing of Voice Actor Russi Taylor and Planning Ahead for Seasons 32 and 33 [Interview]   

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The Simpsons just began its landmark 31st season on Fox, who has renewed the show through at least season 32. The Simpsons is now working under the Disney banner thanks to the merger with 20th Century Fox, and the back catalog of episodes will appear on the Disney+ streaming service. The Simpsons family is still […]

The post ‘The Simpsons’ Showrunner Al Jean on the Passing of Voice Actor Russi Taylor and Planning Ahead for Seasons 32 and 33 [Interview] appeared first on /Film.


          

David's Tea's Halloween collection   

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For today's countdown to Halloween, I have decided to blog about teas. I was getting a bit desperate these last few weeks: David's Tea had not showed up any new collection for my favourite holiday. And then on the 30th of September, they announced on their Facebook page (and I guess other social media) that they had finally released their Halloween collection. This year's theme is allabout  sorcery, divination, supernatural and well, witchcraf. From the look I had at their accessories, it was a good call, far more inspired than last year. It looks much better in any case, and suitably eerie. Sadly, I am not in a country where their products are sold, but hey, at least it's a good Halloween collection this year.

          

Creamy Butternut Squash Risotto   

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This butternut squash risotto is a stunner! The sweet squash contrasts against the ultra creamy rice, savory Parmesan and earthy sage. The smell alone of this butternut squash risotto bubbling away is reason enough to cancel all your plans and make this recipe! The tender, caramelized roasted squash makes sweet pockets in the creamy Parmesan rice dotted with sage. And that smell of shallots sauteing in butter, with a splash of white wine? DIVINE. Alex and I have officially decided that this will be our inaugural fall meal every year. But the great thing about this risotto is that it works all fall and winter long. It’s a perfect vegetarian dinner recipe for entertaining. Why everyone should make a risotto at least once When Alex and I first started cooking together, I thought risotto was an ingredient: like something that came in a box. But when I checked the shelves at the grocery, I couldn’t find anything labeled “risotto”. Come to find out that it’s actually a dish made with a specific type of rice: arborio rice! Arborio rice is a short grain rice that takes on a creamy texture when it’s cooked with broth. Of course, you probably already […]

A Couple Cooks - Healthy, Whole Food, Vegetarian Recipes


          

Part Time Merchandiser - Mondelez - Amesbury, MA   

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You must be at least 18 years of age, have a valid driver's license, reliable transportation, proof of auto insurance and have access to the internet with a…
From Indeed - Tue, 01 Oct 2019 19:08:57 GMT - View all Amesbury, MA jobs

          

Are Chittenden County Recyclables Getting Recycled?   

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Remember when it seemed that recycling could save the world — when our plastic bottles were whisked away along with our guilt about the state of the planet? Our waste isn't really waste, we might have thought. It's amorphous material that can be transformed into new products again and again. All we have to do is put it in the bin. Well, it's 2019, and recent reports by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change indicate that we have about 10 years to avoid catastrophic impacts on the Earth, and that doing so will require unprecedented policy changes. In that context, recycling feels more like a drop in an ocean-size bucket. It doesn't help that recent news reports about recycling in the U.S. have been scary, too. In March, the New York Times reported that some cities have started limiting the number of materials they accept — and some, such as Deltona, Fla., have stopped curbside service altogether. In January, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported that at least half of the city's recycling was actually being incinerated. And the largest recycling chain in California, rePlanet, which operated 284 recycling centers across the state, shut down this month. The company cited low prices on aluminum and plastic, declining state support, and rising operating costs, according to the Sacramento Bee. These reports came in the wake of China's 2018 decision to place new restrictions on the recyclables it will accept, all but cutting off the flow of those materials to the country. In the past, up to 40 percent of American recyclables had been shipped to China, according to the Guardian. As the recyclables market became oversaturated, prices sank, and U.S. cities scrambled to find new buyers. Americans were faced with the terrifying realization that recycled materials don't take care of themselves. Nothing is recyclable unless someone wants to buy it. So what about Chittenden County? What's happening to our bottles, cans and cardboard after they leave our hands? Seven Days reported on the new Chinese restrictions in May 2018, when the Chittenden Solid Waste District raised tipping fees — the charge for haulers who bring recycling to its Materials Recovery Facility — from $21 to $25 per ton to help address its revenue gap. CSWD is the governmental organization that oversees waste management for Burlington and 17 other communities. Currently, the tipping fee is $65 per ton, according to CSWD…

          

WTF: What's Up With the Long-Defunct Sand Bar Inn?   

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Conventional wisdom holds that the first three rules for choosing commercial real estate are location, location and location. If that's the case, what's the deal with the old Sand Bar Inn, a long-vacant motel on the west side of the Sandbar Causeway in South Hero? If ever a spot were prime for commercial ka-ching, this highly visible, 3.7-acre waterfront lot on Route 2 would seem to check all the boxes. It offers spectacular panoramic views of Lake Champlain and the Green Mountains, its own beach access on Outer Malletts Bay, boat slips directly across the road, and Sand Bar State Park about a mile away. It's close to two large population centers — Chittenden County and Montréal — accessible via Interstate 89, and situated in a year-round vacationers' paradise not yet saturated with lodgings and eateries. Developers would also be pleased to know that the site has all the necessary permits in place, no costly or time-consuming environmental review required, a rarity for lakefront development. And, according to its owners, it wouldn't need to be rezoned to accommodate a new motel, restaurant or residential community. Inexplicably, the Sand Bar Inn's website, last updated in 2007, still advertises cottages, lakefront dining, a marina and special events catering. The site even claims that the inn is currently "closed for renovations," though the only signs of repair on a recent July day were new windows installed at least a decade ago. But except for a weekend-long art installation in July 2018 at the inn, titled "From Away," by Burlington-based Overnight Projects, the dilapidated motel has sat unused and unvisited for 14 years, its paint peeling, its roof missing shingles and holes gaping in the siding. "I'm flabbergasted that no one has stepped up and tried to make a run at this property," said Yves Bradley, vice president of commercial brokerage at Pomerleau Real Estate in Burlington, which currently lists the property for sale at $795,000. "But it'll happen." The last decade notwithstanding, Bradley's optimism seems warranted. For nearly a century, the Sand Bar Inn was a popular restaurant and overnight spot for visitors to Grand Isle before it closed for good in 2005. Teresa Robinson, a retired history teacher and former president of the South Hero Historical Society, confirmed via email that the inn was built in 1900 by Benajah Phelps, a toll keeper who collected fares on Sandbar Bridge, a predecessor…

          

(Vermont) Taurus G2c 9mm - $ 230   

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Jason - Jay's Gun Shop in Bristol.
Brand new in the box Taurus G2c 9mm
 
Must be at least 21 and pass background check to purchase.
total out the door $230.00
 
BARREL LENGTH IN INCHES 3.2000
CALIBER 9MM LUGER
DRILLED AND TAPPED N
FINISH BLUED
FRAME MATERIAL POLYMER
GRIP MATERIAL POLYMER
MAGAZINE CAPACITY 12.0000
NUMBER OF MAGAZINES INCLUDED 2.0000
TYPE ACTION FUNCTION SEMI-AUTO
TYPE OF SIGHTS ADJUSTABLE
WEIGHT IN OUNCES 22.0000
NO SALE TO CALIFORNIA NO SALE TO CALIFORNIA
Dimension 1.95 X 6.20 X 9.85
HEIGHT 1.9500
WIDTH 6.2000
LENGTH 9.8500
FRAME COLOR BLACK
SLIDE COLOR BLACK

          

Senior Satellite Bandwith Technician - EchoStar - Cheyenne, WY   

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At least two years of RF engineering experience. SATS) headquartered in Englewood, CO, with additional locations world-wide, is a premier global provider of…
From EchoStar - Mon, 12 Aug 2019 19:15:27 GMT - View all Cheyenne, WY jobs

          

Israeli Forces Detain Nine Palestinians in West Bank, Including Minor   

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At least nine Palestinians, including a minor, were detained by Israeli forces during raids last night across the occupied West Bank, according to the Palestinian Prisoner’s Society (PPS). Army forces raided the West Bank city [...]

The post Israeli Forces Detain Nine Palestinians in West Bank, Including Minor appeared first on Palestine Chronicle.


          

Lead Line Cook - Pasha Cafe LLC - Salt Lake City, UT   

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We are looking for a line cook Must be reliable and have at least 1 year cooking experience. High school or equivalent (Preferred).
From Indeed - Tue, 24 Sep 2019 22:59:36 GMT - View all Salt Lake City, UT jobs

          

Huge blow for APC ahead of Bayelsa governorship election as 6,000 members defect to PDP   

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At least 6,000 members and loyalists of the All Progressives Congress (APC) defected to the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) in Bayelsa ahead of the state's governorship election.

          

Turning Japanese with Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen...   

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Everyone loves her savory Porcini Wagyu Prime Rib Roast and elegant Black Truffle Roast Turkey with Black Truffle Risotto Stuffing. And her rich Lengua en Salsa Porcini. And now, Bambi Reyes-Javelosa of Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen turns Japanese with her new offerings...


You don't need a reason to celebrate with Japanese food. A last minute and spontaneous get-together with friends at home or a sudden celebration at the office, you can always count on Bambi Reyes-Javelosa of Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen to save the day. And if you're craving for Japanese just like everyone else, Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen now offers all your Japanese favorites. Any day just becomes even more special with Japanese food...

Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen is everyone's favorite kitchen for special feasts at home or the office, and this time, Bambi Reyes-Javelosa (L) adds a whole new repertoire of dishes with a Japanese spin to her extensive offerings (for more on Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen, see my earlier post, A Holiday Feast by Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen).


It seems there isn't anything Bambi can't do in her kitchen. Western, Filipino, and now Japanese, Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen has pretty much everything covered. What's even more impressive is that this home kitchen churns out made-to-order dishes with the highest quality using the finest and freshest ingredients on a par with some of the best restaurants and even hotels in the metro. Bambi Reyes-Javelosa's signature seasonal favorites like Wagyu Prime Rib and Roast Turkey are always the centerpiece of countless family feasts at home, and she's adding even more to your list of favorites.

At a preview of Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen's latest offerings, Bambi Reyes-Javelosa served her lavish selections of Japanese dishes including intricate hand-rolled Sushi Rolls made with premium ingredients. Japanese dishes may seem simple, but it's a delicate and tedious cuisine demanding a high level of skill and the very best ingredients to make the flavors pop out. Without these, the flavors fall flat. For Bambi Reyes-Javelosa, nothing ever leaves her kitchen if the ingredients or execution don't make her cut. It's that simple.      


The variety of colors and flavors in Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen's lavish Special Sushi Roll Platter rivals the offerings of premier establishments (for prices and other details, please refer to the contact details listed below). Fresh, clean and bold flavors with a subtle briny sweetness, you just can't expect anything less from Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen. What surprised me the most is the elegant presentation, and one bite validates with its fresh flavors. Bambi Reyes-Javelosa's dishes are of the highest quality, from its fresh ingredients to the masterful execution of each dish is something many of her loyal customers and clients have come to expect from Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen.


Each sushi roll has its own distinct flavors, each one with a different topping delicately arranged on a platter. Imagine the reaction of your guests when you bring this platter to the table.


Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen offers different platters, each with a different selection of tasty bites as well as price points. Following the Japanese aesthetic of artful presentation, you can be sure your guests will be more than impressed at your table. And why not, all of Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen's sumptuous platters first feeds the eyes before the palate. 


Whatever platter you choose, you know you're getting some of the finest and freshest seafood from Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen. Many of their ingredients are flown in and hand-carried directly to their kitchen. Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen's sources also supply some of the metro's best hotels to give you an idea on the quality of the ingredients. Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen offers a wide selection for even more options including local and imported Nigiri Sushi, Assorted Special Rolls and Aburi Sushi.


Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen's Sashimi Platter with thick slices of premium Salmon, Hamachi, Tamago and fresh and briny fish roe is equally impressive. And this platter surely tastes as good as it looks. There's just nothing quite like the creamy, buttery texture of premium salmon that just melts in your mouth followed by an elegant and lingering sweetness. Check out Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen's FB Page at https://God.blue/splash.php?url=3xwi8ejmcaSzlyy7fGDHFA02FFdCTmfuj1mE2dRsMoHkivFOVZ_SLASH_fmvvDjKJaLkHiJiHVo1PFsBdzySsRufW9CzUCZKAU300RqsPblsGzwmQElcpX5EjEpZ9gKTbHZ95m and you'll see a whole slew of tasty videos, including how they do their Tamago from scratch, slicing up a whole tuna and other behind the scenes look at their always busy kitchen. 


The vibrant colors tempts both the eyes and palate, it's just what you need to add a splash of vibrant colors and flavors to any celebration.


The seasonal Shishamo Platter filled with grilled Japanese smelt can be served as an appetizer or entree for any festive occasion. Enjoyed from head to tail, the delicately flavored smelt offers rich and bold notes with just a subtle hint of smokiness from the grill. It's not easy to find this seasonal delicacy in the metro but this is just one of many authentic dishes that Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen offers for its discerning clientele.   


If there's any dish that serves as a proper gauge of any Japanese restaurant's quality, it's usually the tempura. From the batter to the way it's deep-fried for that lightly crisp texture, premium ingredients along with time, temperature and skill come into play for that perfect piece of tempura.  


Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen's Ebi Tempura is way up there when it comes to the perfect tempura. Lightly crisp on the outside and succulent with a tasty snap inside from the large tiger prawn, Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen scores a homer with this one (check out how Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen does their signature tempura on their FB Page at https://God.blue/splash.php?url=3xwi8ejmcaSzlyy7fGDHFA02FFdCTmfuj1mE2dRsMoHkivFOVZ_SLASH_fmvvDjKJaLkHiJiHVo1PFsBdzySsRufW9CzUCZKAU300RqsPblsGzwmQElcpX5EjEpZ9gKTbHZ95m).


A light dip in the tempura sauce coats it with delectable sharp and sweet notes to complement the crisp batter and fresh, briny sweetness of the plump and succulent prawns. This one's good all the way to the tail. And there's a lot to go around with each serving, so there's no need to fight over the last piece (for prices and other details, please contact Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen).


You can't go wrong with the Kurobuta Pork Katsu of Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen with tender pork cutlets draped in a lightly crisp layer of nutty breading served with a thick, sweet and mildly sour dip. Perfectly fried without being excessively greasy, the pork cutlet remains tender and juicy inside capped by the crisp breading.


Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen has another tasty surprise with the seasonal Soft-Shell Crab Tempura with contrasting textures bursting with rich flavors with each bite.


With a light coating of crisp batter, the succulent soft shell crabs drape the palate with a savory and briny sweetness. The dipping sauce adds that sharpness to temper the richness for balanced flavors. This prized delicacy is seasonal, best to call Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen for the latest seasonal catch.


Tender and juicy chicken thighs coated in a thick yet crunchy batter make this another must-have from Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen. The Chicken Karaage is delicately seasoned without overwhelming the subtle and delicate notes of the juicy chicken. 


And once you start, you can go on all the way to the last piece.


Fresh off the teppan grills, the Wagyu Tenderloin Teppanyaki paired with Yasai Itame or stir-fried vegetables is a fitting main course for any festive feast at home.


With huge fork-tender cubes of premium Wagyu beef, the beefy chunks almost melt like butter with just the right bite. Perfect even without any sauce. It's just pure beef goodness. 

Pair your all-Japanese feast with Bambi Gourmet Kitchen's soft and fluffy Seafood Fried Rice (L) and the light Mushroom Soup (R) with its delicately flavored broth filled with a variety of earthy, nutty mushrooms. From starters and sides to savory mains, Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen's got everything covered.


Curry cravings? Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen's got that covered too with the Beef Curry. The mildly spiced thick curry with tender beef and vegetables will have you going for another bowl of rice. Guaranteed.


Creamy with just the right amount of soothing heat, the Crunchy Spicy Tuna Salad is the perfect side to your sumptuous all-Japanese feast by Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen. The rich play on contrasting textures makes each bite different. Second servings? Yes, please.


A comforting bowl of hearty Wagyu Ribeye Sukiyaki with tender slices of premium beef, glass noodles, vegetables and tofu is a mandatory dish for any celebration. And if you have any requests on specific Wagyu grades and classifications, just let Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen know in advance. Just imagine your own bowl of premium sukiyaki with Wagyu Grade 6 Ribeye, right?


When only the best beef will do for your celebration, the Wagyu Prime Rib Steak from Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen is the perfect centerpiece for your Japanese feast.


Each slice and bite is just like butter. Lightly drizzled with a thick and sweet sauce, you don't need anything else for beef this good. No more words needed to describe how good this slab of premium beef is, the picture says it all.


You know you're getting the real thing with Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen's Grilled Hamachi Buri Kama or fatty yellowtail collars. Grilled to perfection, the collars are juicy with rich briny notes complemented by mild smoky undertones from the grill. Even most Japanese restaurants in the metro don't feature this item on their menu on a regular basis, but just give Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen a call. Depending on your order, please allow at least three days to one week leadtime for imported menu items as these are hand-carried from Tokyo, Osaka, Hokkaido and Fukuoka just for Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen.


At the end of the preview, one wonders, is there anything Bambi Reyes-Javelosa can't do? Hotel grade Japanese cuisine prepared just for you, Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen makes any celebration at home or the office easy without the usual fuss. It's fine cuisine from one of the finest home kitchens in the metro (for more on Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen, see my previous post, A Holiday Feast By Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen and prepare to drool with her signature dishes like the Wagyu Prime Rib Roast and Roast Turkey). And there's just more reasons to love Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen as it turns Japanese with its latest offerings of Japanese favorites this holiday season or whatever celebration you have in mind...just give Chef Bambi a call.  

For more on Bambi's Gourmet Kitchen, simply call 0917-672-7230 and 0999-881-4272 or email at bambi_linkedge@yahoo.com and bambi_linkedge@gmail.com for inquiries and more information. You can also visit her FB and IG accounts at @Bambi'sGourmetKitchen.

Dude for Food is now on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube, check out these social media accounts for regular updates on good eats. Better yet, click "Like" and "Follow" and enjoy the ride...just look for the FB and IG widgets on the right sidebar.

          

Poblacion Finds: Obama Noodles, Pho and Morning Glory at VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque   

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Never too timid or shy with flavor, Chef Mikel Zaguirre shares his own take on Vietnamese-inspired street food in Poblacion...


The play on intense and bold flavors is a signature trademark of Mikel Zaguirre, one of the metro's creative chefs. This unabashed and seemingly unapologetic culinary style is highlighted once more in his newest dining concept showcasing the fresh flavors of Vietnamese cuisine at VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque in Makati's Poblacion. Obama Noodles, Pho, Morning Glory and so much more, read on for a tasty peek at Chef Mikel Zaguirre's VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque...


Makati's Poblacion is known for its diverse and eclectic offerings with its cool and laid-back vibe. And VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque fits right in with the Bohemian neighborhood with its fresh-grilled barbecue and other traditional Vietnamese dishes. Southeast Asian dishes, and Vietnamese cuisine in particular, plays with all five fundamental flavors with the use of fish sauce, shrimp paste, chili, soy sauce and the freshest herbs like coriander and vegetables to complete a typical meal. A typical barbeque and hot pot just pops with fresh flavors when combined with a variety of condiments, herbs and spices. Fresh and bold flavors, that's right up Chef Kel's alley too. 

I was always impressed with Chef Kel's culinary style from the days of Locavore, how can one forget the Sizzling Sinigang and Fried Oyster Sisig (more on Locavore on my posts, A Weekend Brunch at Locavore and Let's Do Lunch...Locavore Style.). Chef Kel brings that same approach with the fresh notes of Vietnamese cuisine...


Accompanying every traditional Vietnamese meal is an array of tasty condiments led by Nuoc Cham, a sweet, salty and mildly sour dipping sauce made with fish sauce, lime juice, chili and cilantro. Other tasty condiments include Muoi Ot Xanh made with cilantro, green chili, lime and condensed milk; Pickled Garlic with garlic cloves confit cooked in oil for at least an hour in low heat and soaked in a sweet pickling solution, the fiery Chili Paste with a blend of red chili and garlic, Chili Oil with with red chili steeped in oil for 2-3 hours for that soothing heat and Salt, Pepper & Lime with salt and pepper squeezed with lemon for barbecued meats. It's these traditional dips that add that perfect tartness and heat to any Vietnamese dish. Now that you have the condiments laid out for you, find a table and settle down for a Vietnamese feast.

At VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque, each table has its own set of condiments so you can customize your own dip. Cool down with VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque's refreshing beverages like Fresh Sugar Cane Juice (P 125), Banana Milk (P 125) and Guyabano Lychee (P 125).


Any meal at VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque begins with the traditional Shrimp Crackers (P 120) served with house made Nuoc Cham...


...and if you just can't get enough of the crunch, the Fried Oyster Mushrooms (P 250) should do the trick, a tasty appetizer with deep-fried oyster mushrooms served with house made peanut sauce and Nuoc Cham. Perfectly crisp, each bite delivers the bold earthy notes of mushrooms.


Start your feast with the soothing Fresh Spring Rolls (P 180), cold rolls stuffed with rice noodles, pork belly, succulent shrimps, herbs and carrots served with a thick peanut dip...


...or opt for the Fried Spring Roll (P 200), savory deep-fried ground pork spring rolls paired with spicy Nuoc Cham.


The fresh and fried spring rolls have their own distinct flavors, from the light and clean notes of the fresh spring rolls to the deep savory flavors of the fried version. The peanut dip adds an intense sweetness to the fresh spring rolls while the Nuoc Cham tempers the savory richness of the fried spring rolls.   


The tart Papaya Salad (P 220) with unripe papaya and sour green mangoes topped with housemade beef liver jerky, peanuts, shallots and herbs drizzled with a sweet chili sauce and puffed rice offers all five flavors from sweet, sour, salty, bitter and spicy all in one dish. The freshness of each ingredient adds that crunch and snap.


The Stir-Fried Pork (P 240) with savory ground pork, Hoisin, red chili and ginger topped with pickled grilled bell peppers and a side of crisp rice puffs delivers delicate savory notes with sweet undertones. The yolk adds a layer of richness to the dish balanced by the subtle heat from the red chili. Like most Vietnamese dishes, the play on varied and contrasting notes of this dish bring a flavorful punch with every bite.


Bun Thit Nuong (P 290) or the popular "Obama Noodles" featured in Anthony Bourdain's memorable CNN series, Parts Unknown, is recreated by Chef Mikel Zaguirre at VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque with skewers of juicy grilled pork over cold rice noodles, pickled vegetables, fresh herbs and peanuts drizzled with Nuoc Cham and served with fried spring rolls and homemade pork sausage. The smoky notes of the skewered pork pair well with the sharp Nuoc Cham drenched cold noodles for contrasting yet balanced flavors.


Once you mix all the ingredients in the bowl, the multiple layers of flavors and textures combine for earthy and vibrant notes. The pork barbecue, pork sausage and fried spring rolls adds robust flavors punctuated by the bright hints of freshness from the herbs, pickled vegetables and the Nuoc Cham. A complete meal in itself, I'll come back again and again for this dish.


The Stir-Fried Morning Glory (P 180) is a comfortingly sweet, sour and spicy vegetable dish with kang kong sprinkled with crisp fried shallots. The all too familiar water spinach or swamp cabbage is given a splash of intense flavors making it new and refreshingly different. The crunch from the fried shallots and the natural crispness of the kang kong provide the textural finish to the dish. It's a great side to your barbecue dishes at VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque.


The sweet and spicy Suon Khia is another tasty dish with tender and juicy glazed pork ribs topped with green peppers and cilantro. The sweet glaze just works well with the delicate notes of the pork ribs, and the green peppers with fresh cilantro delivers that flavorful layer of minty and smoky sweetness to complete the dish.


But it's the Vietnamese style barbecue that's the highlight of any meal at VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque...

A charcoal grill is set up on your table, along with a selection of seafood, pork, chicken and beef. There's a wide array pf tasty options to choose from, including Gindara (P 290),  Salmon Fin & Belly (P 320)... 



...the Beef Oyster Blade (P 250) and fresh Octopus (P 230)...

...to Chicken Breast (P 160) and Angus Ribeye (P 490). VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque also offers Pork Belly, Pork Ears, Chicken Tail, Chicken Feet, Chicken Intestines, Angus Beef Belly, Shrimps, Baby Squid, Oysters, Mussels, Smoked Milkfish Belly, Blue Marlin, the VBQ Special and Pork Skewers...


...but whatever you order, you need to include the fresh Scallops (P 290). All the barbecue items are marinated with different Vietnamese sauces and fresh herbs, all you have to do is place them on the grill...


...and let it sizzle for a few minutes.

There's just nothing like grilling your own food right on your table to complete your dining experience. The fragrant aroma just triggers your appetite, and in just a few minutes, you can grab your piece straight out of the grill. From the freshly grilled Scallops (R)...
 




...to the Gindara (L) and Salmon Fin and Belly (R)...


...the Beef Oyster Blade (L) and tender Angus Ribeye (R), your Vietnamese-style fresh-off-the-grill barbecue becomes a sumptuous feast at VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque.

A bowl of garden-fresh leafy herbs complete your Vietnamese feast at VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque. Simply grab some fresh greens and herbs, add some barbecue, roll it and have one big bite. The combination of savory flavors with that layer of smokiness is perfectly balanced by the fresh, crisp and clean notes of the herbs and lettuce. That's Vietnamese style barbecue.


But Chef Mikel Zaguirre isn't done yet. The fresh ingredients for VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque's Beef Pho Pot (P 500) are then prepped with fresh tofu, okra, herbs, slices of beef belly and rice noodles... 


...and added one at a time in a richly flavored beef stock gently simmering over charcoal. The rich and deep-flavored stock is prepared in advance requiring long hours in low heat. The hot pot, with its enriched soup stock, is then ready for the different ingredients.


First, add the beef belly followed by the tofu, vegetables and rice noodles. 



Then, cover the pot with the lid and just let the hot charcoal do its magic. 


After just a few more minutes, your Beef Pho Pot is ready. Grab a bowl and load it up topped with more fresh herbs and a squeeze of lemon. The rich broth, the tender beef, silky smooth tofu, the vegetables and the herbs just comes together in a seamless and flavorful blend, warming both the palate and body with its comforting richness. Good food and reasonable price points, VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque is a welcome addition to Poblacion's culinary scene. Satisfied with a hearty meal, why not head on up the second floor...


...for a round of handcrafted cocktails at Bang Bang? The mood and vibe shifts the minute you enter Bang Bang, one of Poblacion's many hidden bars. The classic Old-Fashioned sets the tone for an evening of infinite possibilities at Bang Bang.


There's always something new at Poblacion, it's what keeps the neighborhood high on the list for dining and a few drinks to complete your immersion in this vibrant community. Add VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque and Bang Bang to your list on your next Poblacion crawl...

VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque is located at 4969 Guerrero Street, Poblacion, Makati City. Bang Bang is located at the Second Floor, directly above VBQ Vietnamese Barbeque.

Dude for Food is now on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube, check out these social media accounts for regular updates on good eats. Better yet, click "Like" and "Follow" and enjoy the ride...just look for the FB and IG widgets on the right sidebar.

          

Couch Slouch: Still riled up about replay reviews   

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Note to readers: I had not planned to pen a second consecutive column on officiating, but a couple of readers got me really riled up.

So one reader emailed that I “misused” the term “slippery slope” and another told me I had “misappropriated” the term last week when I wrote that replay as an officiating tool is a slippery slope.

Balderdash.

Incidentally, whether I use or misuse, appropriate or misappropriate any term is up to me. It’s my column, my time, my two cents’ worth – well, at least until we ban the penny. So bug off and go read The New Yorker if you crave more precise and correct use of the language.

And, what, now we’re going to have replay challenges on my column? No, no, no, no, no. I write it, you read it, and we move on. I’m not going to sit here beholden to every Tom, Dick and Harriet googling my every proclamation and preposition.

I stand by my work, week in and week out. Like Andy Reid just said, “Not all of Mozart’s paintings were perfect.”

But I digress.

For those of you who found my “slippery slope syndrome” explanation wanting, let me then switch replay gears and present my “small barking dog syndrome.”

Sometimes there is a small, barking dog at your ankles that keeps nipping at your pants cuff. It’s irritating, yet not enough to do more than shake your leg occasionally to free yourself of the dog’s grip. But then you look down several minutes later and notice that this small barking yapping irritating creature has ripped your pants leg completely wide open.

And, there, my friends, you have the basic problem of replay as an officiating tool.

So I again plead to Sports Nation – let’s return to kinder, simpler pre-replay days.

(People often fault me for “living in the past.” Uh, I can’t live in the future, can I? I am the product of two centuries; both have their merits and their flaws. Alas, replay as an officiating tool was mindlessly birthed in the 20th century and is reaching its devastating potential in the 21st century. Then again, since I have serious doubts if there will be a 22nd century, this problem might solve itself.)

Many people think officiating, particularly in the NFL and the NBA, is worse than ever; it’s not. The officials are just scrutinized more than ever.

Do you think there was replay review when the games used to be only on radio?

Are games harder to officiate now because athletes are bigger, stronger and faster? Maybe. But it’s definitely harder to officiate when millions are officiating alongside you. There are even websites, like footballzebras.com, that assess and review officials’ calls 24-7.

Trust me, it would not be half as fun being an actuary if every line of your work were under replay review.

And when’s the last time you saw, say, a ballet or an opera stopped because of a replay challenge? Man, those would be momentum killers – for instance, “La Boheme” would lose all of its steam if, just before Mimi’s climactic coughing fit, Schaunard questions the receipt on the pink bonnet that Rodolpho has bought for her and throws the challenge flag.

The fact of the matter is, there are fouls and penalties committed on virtually every possession in basketball, football and life.

If you whistled every foul in the NBA by the book, every player would foul out.

If you called every holding by an offensive lineman or every pass interference, NFL games would take five hours.

If you held a U.S. president accountable for every high crime and misdemeanor committed while in the Oval Office, we wouldn’t have a president.

Sometimes – particularly on the field of play – you just have to let stuff go.

(Best I can tell, the major professional sport least affected at this point by replay is hockey. So, maybe, just maybe – I know I’m going to regret this – NHL, here I come! When does the regular season start?)

Ask The Slouch

Q. When the Chicago Bears announced Mitch Trubisky injured his “non-throwing shoulder,” did your finely honed journalism instincts lead you to ask if the team could be more specific? (Jeremy Sandler; Toronto)

A. Pay the man, Shirley.

Q. Even the slightest improvement in equipment can give an athlete a competitive advantage. Shouldn’t some company start making underwear for left-handed men? (Jack Leininger; Spokane, Wash.)

A. Pay the man, Shirley.

Q. Do you have any insight as to whether NBA referee Scott Foster is the “whistleblower” that President Trump is looking for? (Elliott Jaffa; Arlington, Va.)

A. Pay the man, Shirley.

Q. Do you miss when the Washington R*dsk*ns used to win the offseason? I mean, it was a win. (Mike Garland; Washington, D.C.)

A. Pay the man, Shirley.

You, too, can enter the $1.25 Ask The Slouch Cash Giveaway. Just emailasktheslouch@aol.com and, if your question is used, you win $1.25 in cash!


          

A Grip on Sports: Every sport seems to have some sort of presence in October, which makes weekends pretty fun   

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A GRIP ON SPORTS • A weird confluence of American sporting events occurred over the weekend and you might not even have noticed it. Just call it the overlap weekend and move on.

•••••••

• Winter may be the season of ice and snow, spring of rebirth and summer of the lazy day, but fall? Fall is special. It’s when everything in the sporting world intersects.

It’s hard to think of a better example than yesterday.

The NFL dominated, of course, as it would no matter which of the 52 Sundays it is. But it wasn’t alone on the stage.

The MLS held its final competitions of the regular season, deciding which teams would make the playoffs and where they would be slotted. All the games were played at the same time, forcing fans to continually check scores in the afternoon hours.

The NBA continued its preseason preparations, which included an international incident of some import.

The NHL season is underway, with the regular season just a prelude to one of the best playoffs in all professional sports. Unless, you know, your team is based in Canada.

Golf is actually in the midst of the 2020 season, even as we wait for the Presidents Cup to fill our team match-play competition desire before 2019 hits the 19th hole.

And baseball? It’s rolling toward its finale, as summer held on in the Eastern part of the nation and the Nationals bullpen couldn’t hold off the Dodgers.

No matter which sport you love beyond all others, be it boxing, horse racing, college hoops or even tennis, there was something going on in the weekend just past. And not just some always some exhibition, even though, as Kansas’ basketball program discovered, too much of that can cause problems.

Yesterday, for example, we sat in front of the TV for a couple hours and watched, in order of excitement, the RedZone, baseball playoffs, a soccer match from Portland and Kevin Na make a whole bunch of long putts.

It was the Granny’s Buffet of sports. And it was all you could consume.

• What’s ahead this week?

Well, baseball continues its playoffs, with the Braves and Dodgers seemingly headed toward a National League showdown reminiscent of the 1980s, and the Yankees and Astros, both winners of 100-plus games, doing the same in the American League.

College football features a whole bunch of big games Saturday, including what was once the greatest intersectional rivalry in sports (USC vs. Notre Dame). The Cougars also return to the field with a new man (or men) in charge of their defense.

The NFL continues its regular season, as the Seahawks prepare to play the Cleveland Browns (and I read up on the correct way to grill a kielbasa). Will this be the week Russell Wilson finally throws an interception and the national pundits can declare him “overrated?”

Winter may be just around the next bend but, for a while at least, we can forget about it. Our thoughts can be on the smorgasbord of sports we have to consume. What a great way to fatten up for the cold ahead.  

•••

WSU: Not a lot in the football arena today, but the soccer team did score a big win in the Bay Area on a golden goal. … Elsewhere in the Pac-12 and around the nation, there are a whole bunch of teams still undefeated after five weeks of the football season. They all have made their way near the top of the Associated Press Top 25. … Washington’s passing offense seems to have stalled recently. How did that happen? … Oregon State’s offense seems to be on fire, though it’s hard to tell after the Beavers just played a woeful UCLAdefense. We will know more after they play Utah this weekend. The 15th-ranked Utes are coming off a bye. … Don’t expect Chip Kelly to quit. … Oregon may have struggled a bit against California, but everyone does. … Arizona is atop the South Division standings. That is all. … USC travels to South Bend this weekend.

Gonzaga: Mark Few spoke out last week concerning the California legislature’s interjecting itself into the likeness and image discussion. As we reported, he wasn’t too happy with the “help.” He expounded on that a bit Saturday and his thoughts are part of this Justin Reed story. … Seth Davis came to Spokane recently and had a meal at Jack and Dan's. Ya, that's what he had there. More importantly, he spoke with a bunch of former Gonzaga players about the past – and the present.

Chiefs: Everett figured out a way to slow what had been a potent Spokane offense and it resulted in a 4-3 Silvertips win last night at the Arena. Kevin Dudley was there and has this coverage. Libby Kamrowski also has a photo gallery.

Seahawks: The trade deadline looms, but getting Jarran Reed back will be a bigger deal.

Sounders:Roman Torres returned from his suspension and scored the only goal in a 1-0 win over Minnesota. The victory locked up second in the West for Seattle. … Portland won 3-1 and earned a playoff berth. … Real Salt Lake picked up a victory that moved into third in the West.

•••       

• Once, a long time ago, my father-in-law came up for a visit. He brought his tools with him. Nice man. He and I were doing some work in the back of the house. He was disgusted with my inability to complete many of what he considered simple tasks. I get it. My skills in that regard were – and are – limited. His were spectacular. Finally, he turned to me and said something I still remember today, some 25 years later. “If I had known (Kim) was going to marry someone like you, I would have taught her more.” I’m thinking of that today as a contractor comes out to my home to fix things I should be able to. At least I’m pretty good at writing a check. Until later …


          

Clean jerseys of wide receivers spell trouble for Huskies’ passing game   

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STANFORD, Calif. – The Washington Huskies’ passing game is broken.

That fact was evident at 10:48 on Saturday night as Chris Petersen’s Huskies trudged in a sad procession toward the southeast tunnel at Stanford Stadium. As they did, the public address announcer boomed, “When the eastern part of the country wakes up in the morning, they’ll see the final score: Stanford 23, Washington 13!”

Senior wide receiver Aaron Fuller walked with his helmet on, head down, his once-white jersey now stained various shades of green and red. The jersey, in this case, was a visual receipt; it spoke silently, but unmistakably, reflecting Fuller’s substantial role in the Husky offense.

Terrell Bynum’s jersey was clean. Andre Baccellia’s jersey was clean. Quinten Pounds’ jersey was clean. Marquis Spiker’s jersey was clean. Austin Osborne’s jersey was clean. Puka Nacua’s jersey was clean.

They either didn’t receive an opportunity, or failed to take advantage when they did.

Indeed, the 5-foot-11, 188-pound Fuller was targeted a whopping 17 times Saturday night, and turned in nine catches (and at least three drops) for 171 yards, with a long of 37.

Otherwise, UW’s remaining wide receivers combined for an utterly incompetent two catches for 10 yards … which all came in the fourth quarter. No other Husky pass-catcher was targeted more than five times on the night. Junior tight end Hunter Bryant caught just one pass for 8 yards and dropped a pair of passes that would have extended drives on third down.

Junior quarterback Jacob Eason, meanwhile, completed all five of his pass attempts for 56 yards and a touchdown in his team’s torrid opening drive. He completed 11 of 31 passes for 150 yards and an interception, while being sacked twice, the rest of the way.

It’s been written before, but bears repeating: entering the game, Stanford’s defense ranked 127th nationally in opponent completion percentage (70.6), 126th in opponent pass efficiency rating (170.60), 124th in opponent yards per attempt (9.4), 115th in passing defense (287.4 yards a game) and 111th in touchdown passes allowed (11).

So how did this happen? Or, as Petersen was asked in the postgame news conference, “What needs to change to get the passing game going?”

“That’s a good question. That’s a good question,” he repeated. “(There were) dropped balls, and we’ve got to give our quarterback more answers, too. I know a couple times he was standing back there without answers.

“But you couple that with little protection stuff and he’s running around, and a couple guys didn’t make plays for him. And when you’re not going to get the ball a bunch, you better capitalize.”

Here’s what not-getting-the-ball-a-bunch looks like: Baccellia, UW’s senior starter opposite Fuller, has excelled in three nonconference games – posting 13 catches for 195 and two touchdowns.

But in three games against Pac-12 competition, he has been rendered utterly ineffective, managing just six catches – two per game – for 41 yards. Still, the coaching staff has (perhaps stubbornly) stuck with him. Saturday, he contributed one essentially irrelevant catch for a single yard on five targets.

Senior wide receiver Chico McClatcher, meanwhile, has not caught a pass since the 52-20 victory over Hawaii on Sept. 14. Nacua – a 6-1, 204-pound former four-star freshman – has been targeted a grand total of one time this season, and he turned that target into a picturesque 28-yard touchdown. And it’s not that Puka isn’t playing, either; the highly touted freshman receiver just rarely runs a route. Most often, he enters the game, blocks for a running play and then immediately exits again. This begs the obvious question: they burned his redshirt so he could block?

As for the trio of talented former four-star redshirt freshmen, Austin Osborne has recorded one catch for minus-2 yards this season. Spiker – who holds the California state prep record with 72 receiving touchdowns – has played in three games without earning a target, and 182-pound speedster Trey Lowe has been sidelined for the first six games with an infection.

Petersen often has repeated that those who practice most consistently will earn opportunities in games. But, if Fuller and Baccellia are so much better than everybody else, isn’t that also an issue? If players as presumably talented as Nacua, Osborne and Spiker all can’t earn a target in a lopsided 10-point defeat, who’s really to blame?

When asked if UW’s pass game woes can be traced to personnel and an inability to get open, Petersen said, “I think it’s everything. We’ll look at the tape there. But like I said, I know a couple times we’ve just got to cut our losses. (Eason) threw a couple good balls in there that we didn’t make plays on. We’ve got do a better job, there’s no question, in the pass game.”

In three nonconference games, Eason has completed 77.5% of his passes, throwing for 901 yards and 10 touchdowns with one interception (while being sacked just once).

Meanwhile, in three Pac-12 contests, the former Lake Stevens High School standout has completed just 54.3% of his passes, throwing for 548 yards with one touchdown and two interceptions (while being sacked seven times).

In Eason, Washington touts perhaps the Pac-12’s (and the nation’s?) most physically talented passer. And yet the Huskies rank sixth in the conference in passing touchdowns (11), seventh in completion percentage (65.8), eighth in yards per attempt (8.1) and pass efficiency rating (150.4) and ninth in passing offense (248.8 yards a game).

Too often, Eason has stood in the backfield without any answers. Perhaps that’s play-calling. Perhaps it’s personnel, or coaching, or preparation, or all of the above. With UW’s next three Pac-12 games coming against 4-1 Arizona, 4-1 Oregon and 4-1 Utah, Petersen and Co., have precious little time to improve their suddenly incompetent passing attack.

The Huskies’ jerseys were clean on Saturday night.

Their execution was anything but.


          

A Grip on Sports: Young Zags and an old story highlight a Cougar-less Saturday   

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A GRIP ON SPORTS • It’s a rare fall Saturday the past couple decades in which we haven’t had to work. Which opened an almost unlimited vista of opportunities on a clear, crisp day. We stayed (or went) inside. But that doesn’t mean we didn’t watch sports. And learn some things.

•••••••

• Thanks to a family friend, Kim and I were able to attend the Kraziness in the Kennel with some VIP perks. What does that mean? Our line was shorter, we got to mingle and watch TV, enjoy a cold beverage – don’t worry, I had diet soda – and sit in decent seats.

Oh, and catch up with some old friends, which is always nice. Then find out the oldest of Gonzaga’s friendly men’s basketball players is out again, though Mark Few wouldn’t term Killian Tillie’s absence Saturday injury-based. Sure, Tillie had surgery again, but it was preventative, sort of like why we take a cholesterol pill every night.

We do it to make sure there are no problems down the road.

As John Blanchette points out in his column this morning, that would go down easier with the Zag faithful if it applied to anyone other than Tillie, the most snakebit player Gonzaga has had since at least Josh Heytvelt.

The guy sitting in front of me sure had a lot to say about that, none of it positive. His response to the news of Tillie's surgery seemed a little out of proportion, venom-wise. And we thought GU fans were more of the nurturing, loving type.

Few is going to have to be a bit more nurturing and loving this season, that’s for sure. All but three players on the court yesterday afternoon were new to the roster (four when you count Tillie). Two are senior transfers (Admon Gilder and Ryan Gilder, both guards and both players who will contribute). The rest are freshmen.

Six of them.

Do they have talent? Of course they do. They wouldn’t be at GU if they didn’t. But nothing can make them older except time, practice and a tough non-conference schedule.

The Zags will scrimmage with Michigan State, a lot of folks’ pick to win the NCAA title. They will play at Texas A&M, Gilder’s old school. They will face quality in the Bahamas at a Thanksgiving tournament. They play at Washington and Arizona, two of the Pac-12’s better teams, in December. And they host North Carolina, the bluest of blue bloods.

No wonder Few told the crowd it would play a bigger-than-usual role in helping his team this season.

Their voices and support won’t help, though, as much as the passage of time.

• There is one nice perk when the Pac-12 team you follow (in my case, for work) has a bye. You get to focus on the conference’s other games. Sometimes that isn’t good.

If you happened to watch Stanford’s upset of Washington (and I did) last night, you were able to experience a little of why the conference has such a poor reputation concerning its officiating.

Sorry to go there, but there were so many little things done poorly, it undermines the fans’ confidence the conference’s representatives will get the big things right.

Case in point, a first-half punt. What happened seems minor, but it isn’t. Mainly because it was so embarrassing.

With time running down in the half and Stanford hoping to extend a 13-10 lead, the Huskies’ Joel Whitford uncorked a line-drive punt. It was so short it hit a Washington player in the leg at the Stanford 27-yard line, then kicked forward and rolled dead at the 10.

Everyone in the stadium knew it happened, including the officials and the ESPN announcers. What the former group didn’t know, however, was exactly where. Those of us at home did – as should of the folks in the replay booth. All we (and they) had to do was hit one button on the remote to see. It was the 27. That’s where the ball should have been marked. It wasn’t. When referee Kevin Mar came on our screen to explain, he told us about the touching and where it occurred. He said the 20-yard line, a point at which the ball had been rolling free. He and his crew were wrong.

This is what replay is meant for. The clock is stopped, the mistake is obvious. Buzz down and fix it. Nope. The ball stayed at the 20. Thousand of people watching at home, including the folks in charge of the conference’s officiating and those in charge of its image, knew it was wrong. Fix it. Nope. The ball stayed at the 20.

By the way, those seven yards may have ultimately cost Stanford a shot at a long Jet Toner field goal attempt. We will never know. But we do know the Cardinal didn’t start their possession in the right spot.

•••

WSU: Even though Theo Lawson was enjoying the bye week by celebrating friends’ nuptials (hey, he put his plans on Twitter, so I don’t feel bad sharing), he still talked with Mike Leach and let the Cougar coach enlighten us on defensive coordinator Tracy Claeys’ departure. Though Leach’s comments didn’t shed a whole lot of light on the change. …The letters to the editor on Leach's comments following the Utah loss were mixed in nature. … Elsewhere in the Pac-12, the standings seem a bit upside down right now. … Stanford controlled the line of scrimmage, made plays when it had to and ultimately held off Washington in the upset of the day. The Huskies never found their rhythm in the loss. … California shut outOregon for a half, then the Ducks asserted themselves to gain a tight home win. The Bears' lack of offense cost them in the end. … The Arizona offense came alive behind a healthyKhalil Tate and the Wildcats won in Colorado. The Buffs might be better than their record, however. They certainly are beat up. … UCLAcertainly isn't all that good. The Bruins looked poor again as Oregon State went into the Rose Bowl and outscoredthe host team, adding to Chip Kelly's woes. … The college athletic model will change.

Gonzaga: The Kraziness in the Kennel was just that, especially in the way the Gonzaga students went out of their way to make a quartet of recruits feel wanted (Justin Reed has a story). Besides the Killie injury (as we said, covered in John’s column), the news was a nearly new roster for the Zags. In Mark Few’s years on campus there has probably a season with more turnover – after more than three decades as an assistant and a head coach, it’s hard to imagine anything new – but we can’t think of one. Jim covers that aspect of the day. … Jim has another story as he passed along the news freshman Oumar Ballo, the most physically impressive player on the court, is still waiting for the NCAA to rule on his eligibility. … Jesse Tinsley braved the crowds of cameras for the best shots in this photo gallery.

EWU: Our Ryan Collingwood was in Sacramento, probably to catch up with his yearly quota of In-N-Out, but also to cover the game. He has this story. … Around the Big Sky,

Idaho: A week after dropping a road game to woeful Northern Colorado – the Bears are 1-5 after losing at Northern Arizona yesterday – the Vandals looked like a Big Sky contender again Saturday. But fourth-ranked Weber State was able to hold on for 41-35 win in the Kibbie Dome. Peter Harriman has the coverage.

Whitworth: The Pirates finally played at home Saturday and my, how did they play. How does winning 82-7 sound? Dan Thompson was at the Pine Bowl and has this game story.

Preps: There was one football game left over from Friday night, pushed back to Saturday after some lightning around Albi Stadium. The was some lightning yesterday, but it was all confined to the playing surface and most of it supplied by Lewis and Clark’s Keani Guthmueller. Dave Nichols was there and he has this story on LC’s 43-36 win over Post Falls. … Gonzaga Prep wing Liam Lloyd announced his college commitment yesterday, going on social media to tell everyone he will be playing at Grand Canyon College. Dave has a story on that as well. … Mead golfer Matt Jones was under par last weekend in an event at Pebble Beach. That news is part of our local briefs.

Chiefs: Spokane’s offense stayed hot, rolling Tri-City 7-1 last night in Kennewick.

Seahawks: No game today. Isn't that odd? Let's look ahead instead.

•••       

• Because Kim and I were out and about yesterday, I didn’t get anything I wanted done. Which means my Sunday will be busy. At least the sun will be out and  temperature is going to be in the high 50s today, making the mowing and raking and fertilizing a little more enjoyable. Until later …


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