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China investiga a la empresa que vendió a España los test rápidos del virus   

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Pekín, 31 mar (EFE).- China ha abierto una investigación a la empresa Shenzhen Bioeasy Biotechnology, que vendió al Gobierno de España una partida de test rápidos para detectar el coronavirus que, según las autoridades españolas, resultaron defectuosos, informaron este martes a Efe fuentes oficiales.

Los resultados de esa investigación, que aún continúa, no han detectado irregularidades por el momento, según las mismas fuentes, que recalcaron que el Gobierno chino no 'tolerará ninguna práctica' que no se ajuste a los criterios autorizados.

El Gobierno español compró a través de un proveedor nacional 640.000 test rápidos a esa compañía china, con sede en la provincia meridional de Cantón, de los que los primeros 58.000 llegaron la semana pasada a España.

El ministro de Sanidad español, Salvador Illa, dijo el pasado viernes que las primeras unidades de los test 'no han pasado los controles de calidad' después de que varios laboratorios de microbiología de grandes hospitales del país detectasen que no funcionaban bien.

'El fabricante en China ha asumido la devolución y los reemplazará por un nuevo modelo de test', indicó entonces el departamento de Sanidad en un comunicado.

La empresa Bioeasy no figuraba entre la lista de proveedores autorizados que el Ministerio de Comercio de China ofreció a España, aunque Sanidad aseguró que la compra a esa compañía 'se inició antes de que las autoridades chinas facilitaran nuevos listados de proveedores' al Gobierno.

Los test de la empresa china cuentan, sin embargo, con la homologación CE de la Unión Europea (UE) para su compra y comercialización en toda Europa.

Las fuentes consultadas por Efe indicaron que, aunque los productos no estén aún aprobados por el Gobierno chino pueden ser homologados por la UE ya que el procedimiento sigue vías diferentes.

Asimismo, recalcaron que hasta el momento no se han encontrado irregularidades en la compañía Bioeasy e indicaron que, en el caso de los test rápidos comprados por España, existen dos formas de usarlos por lo que se pudo haber producido 'algún malentendido respecto al modo de empleo'.

Una vez que la pandemia parece haber remitido en China, el país asiático está exportando grandes partidas de test de detección del coronavirus, así como diferente material médico y sanitario a numerosos países del mundo.

El diario oficial Beijing Daily informó hoy de que 23 nuevos reactivos de detección y siete tipos de nuevos dispositivos médicos como respiradores, ropa protectora o mascarillas han sido aprobados por las autoridades.

Las empresas que solicitan el registro de nuevos reactivos de detección deben presentar una serie de documentación referida a la evaluación clínica, el análisis de riesgo del producto, los informes de inspección o los datos de investigación de los componentes empleados, entre muchos otros aspectos.

Entre los 23 nuevos reactivos aprobados, se encuentran 15 de detección de ácido nucleico y 8 de detección de anticuerpos, que, según el Beijing Daily, mejoran 'la eficiencia de la detección doméstica'. EFE


          

China probes company that sold rapid test kits to Spain   

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Beijing, Mar 31 (efe-epa).- China has launched an investigation into Shenzhen Bioeasy Biotechnology, a Chinese company that sold a batch of coronavirus test kits to Spain which Spanish authorities said were faulty, official sources told Efe on Tuesday. Despite the results of the ongoing investigation not detecting any irregularities in the tests yet, the Chinese …
          

China investiga a la empresa que vendió a España los test rápidos del virus    

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Los resultados de esa investigación a Shenzhen Bioeasy Biotechnology no han detectado irregularidades por el momento
          

Huawei posts 5.6% rise in 2019 profit, smallest increase in three years   

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SHENZHEN, China (Reuters) - China’s Huawei Technologies reported its smallest annual profit increase in three years, hurt by weak overseas sales amid an intensifying U.S. campaign to restrict its global expansion due to security concerns.


          

China investiga a la empresa que vendió a España los test rápidos del coronavirus   

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China ha abierto una investigación a la empresa Shenzhen Bioeasy Biotechnology, que vendió al Gobierno de España una partida de test rápidos par...
          

The Shenzhen Experiment: a book review   

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CHINA
31 March 2020
Shenzhen

The Shenzhen Experiment: a book review

John West reviews the Shenzhen Experiment by Juan Du.

The rise of Shenzhen is arguably the greatest success story in world economic history. Just four decades ago, it was a mere fishing village. Today, metro Shenzhen has a population of over 20 million people, with some of the world’s tallest buildings. Its GDP per capita is the highest in China, according to some estimates. And it is widely regarded as China's answer to Silicon Valley with leading Chinese companies like Tencent, Huawei, ZTE, BYD and BGI based there.

What is Shenzhen’s founding myth? According to the Chinese Communist Government, today’s Shenzhen is the product of its brilliant policies. This “fishing village turned megalopolis” is presented as a well-planned “instant city.” But the story might be more complex, writes Juan Du in her recent book, "The Shenzhen Experiment: the story of China's instant city".

Juan Du, an award-winning architect, urban planner and academic, tells her story of Shenzhen through some of the people who made the city. The book opens with the story of Jiang Kairui, a budding song lyricist, who travels from the north-east of China to Shenzhen and wrote the song “The Story of Spring”, which was a huge national hit. Jiang became a successful songwriter, and in 2010 was named one of “Thirty Outstanding People of Shenzhen”.

Jiang’s journey was a few months after Deng Xiaoping’s mythologised “Southern Tour” in 1992 during which he visited Shenzhen and relaunched China’s reforms in the wake of the Tiananmen Square massacre, Some of the others to feature in her story are oyster fishermen, villages that remain encased within city blocks, and a secret informal housing system. It's Shenzhen’s people, more than Beijing’s leadership, which are principally behind Shenzhen’s success, according to Du.

Shenzhen is where China’s dramatic economic transformation started. Deng Xiaoping, China’s paramount leader, was so concerned about China’s poverty that he decided to experiment with market economics. So in 1979, he decided to create, in the rural borderland with Hong Kong, China’s first Special Economic Zone (SEZ). It would be a pilot for China’s reform and opening, and the world’s most successful economic zone, Du writes.

Despite having Deng’s support, the Shenzhen SEZ model was not supported by many of the conservatives in Beijing. Du explains that the creation of the SEZ in 1979 was “controversial, unpopular, and filled with insecurity and uncertainty”. In fact there were only very modest initial official ambitions for Shenzhen. At the time of its creation, a population of only 300,000 was projected for the zone by 2000, a fraction of what the city would become. And as conservatives tightened control in the wake of the 1989 Tiananmen massacre, Shenzhen’s future was seriously in doubt until Deng Xiaoping’s famous 1992 “Southern Tour” got reform back on track.

How did Shenzhen succeed so famously? For Du, three factors stand out. First, Shenzhen’s urban form and organization is “rooted in centuries of complex cultural evolution from earlier settlements,” including roles as an important port and administrative center.

Alongside some of China’s most stunning skyscrapers, Shenzhen still has over three hundred “villages in the city” or urban villages, which evolved from roughly two thousand former agrarian historic villages. These villages altogether hold nearly half of the city’s immense population. And the most important industrial engines during Shenzhen’s first decade of development were indeed town and village enterprises, rather than multinational enterprises or large Chinese enterprises.

Second, its economic success is deeply tied to its physical proximity and interpersonal ties with Hong Kong. Over the years many Shenzhen citizens have migrated to Hong Kong, thereby providing the networks which facilitated the city’s rapid development.

Third, the masses of internal migrants, both skilled and unskilled, who provided the city’s energy and dynamism.

The uniqueness of Shenzhen is evident in that the Chinese government has built hundreds of new towns using the Shenzhen model, but none has come close to replicating the city’s level of economic success.

“The idea that Shenzhen is a replicable model reinforces the assumption that cities can be politically planned and socially engineered from scratch,” Du writes. “But the Shenzhen experiment, as a singular successful case, has overshadowed the numerous examples of zone-based urbanization and developments which have not flourished in the same way.”

In August of 2019, the country’s State Council released a statement announcing that Shenzhen was to be developed into a “pilot demonstration area of socialism with Chinese characteristics”, with the aim of it becoming a “global benchmark city”. The timing of the announcement was unsurprising -- the government attention lavished on Shenzhen is in direct response to the civil unrest in Hong Kong.

Despite Beijing’s earlier hesitations, it now warmly embraces the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone.

Du’s book provides fascinating insights into the ups and downs of Shenzhen and its precarious journey. And for this reason it makes an excellent contribution to our understanding of China’s rise.

She does, however, not give enough credit to Deng Xiaoping. Sure, the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone is the product of its people and its historical and cultural context. But without Deng, it could well have been stopped.

Further, many readers will no doubt find the text heavy-going in parts because of all the details on urban planning documents and zoning decisions.
Tags: china, Shenzhen, Shenzhen Experiment, Juan Du.
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FangDD Reports Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2019 Unaudited Financial Results   

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SHENZHEN, China, March 31, 2020 (GLOBE...
          

Huize Holding Limited Reports Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2019 Unaudited Financial Results   

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SHENZHEN, China, March 31, 2020 (GLOBE...
          

Huawei reports 19-pct revenue growth in 2019   

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SHENZHEN, March 31 (Xinhua) -- Chinese tech giant Huawei`s sales revenue in 2019 rose 19.1...
          

Huawei posts 5.6% rise in 2019 profit, smallest increase in three years   

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SHENZHEN, China (Reuters) – China’s Huawei Technologies reported its smallest annual profit increase in three years, hurt by weak overseas sales amid an intensifying U.S. campaign to restrict its global expansion due to security concerns. Net profit for 2019 came in at 62.7 billion yuan ($8.9 billion), up 5.6% compared with a 25% jump a [...]
          

Huawei voert omzet op ondanks Amerikaanse ban    

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SHENZHEN (AFN/BLOOMBERG) - Het Chinese Huawei Technologies heeft vorig jaar zijn omzet opgevoerd ondanks het ingestelde verbod voor Amerikaanse bedrijven om zaken te doen met het technologiebedrijf. Het grootste techconcern van China zag zijn opbrengsten oplopen tot 859 miljard yuan, omgerekend 110 miljard euro. Dat betekende een groei van 5,6 procent vergeleken met een jaar eerder.
          

Huawei Warns of ‘Pandora’s Box’ If U.S. Curbs Taiwan Supply   

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Huawei Warns of ‘Pandora’s Box’ If U.S. Curbs Taiwan Supply(Bloomberg) -- Huawei Technologies Co. is bracing for its most difficult year on record in 2020, when tightening U.S. sanctions and the Covid-19 pandemic threaten to slam an already slowing business.Rotating Chairman Eric Xu said he’s aware of the potential for Washington to tighten restrictions on the company, including by stopping Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. from selling chips to Huawei. The Chinese government wouldn’t tolerate such action and it would irrevocably damage the global supply chain, Xu said in some of Huawei’s strongest comments against the Trump administration’s measures so far.“If the Pandora’s box were to be opened, we’ll probably see catastrophic damage to the global supply chain -- and it won’t just be one company, Huawei, destroyed,” Xu told reporters after unveiling 2019 earnings. “I don’t think the Chinese government will just watch and let Huawei be slaughtered on a chopping board. I believe the Chinese government will also take some countermeasures.”China’s biggest tech company remains in Washington’s cross-hairs even as Covid-19 spreads across the globe. The White House is reportedly considering imposing restrictions on the sale of semiconductors to Huawei by global corporations such as TSMC and Samsung Electronics Co., a move that would effectively deprive the Chinese giant of the most advanced chip technology. That would escalate already damaging restrictions on Huawei, which on Tuesday reported net profit grew 5.6% -- the slowest pace of bottom line growth in three years.“Why can’t China ban the use of American 5G chips, base stations, smartphones and other smart devices based on the same network security reasons?” Xu said, adding he couldn’t confirm reports about curbs on TSMC.Huawei had previously reported sales growth of about 19%, to 859 billion yuan ($123 billion) in 2019, roughly the same as in the previous year. And the Shenzhen-based company’s profit improved to 62.7 billion yuan. But Xu said 2019 was its most difficult year yet, when it was forced to transform its business after expansive scrutiny and sanctions from the U.S. The effort to contain Huawei -- and by extension, China -- forced the company to turn inward.The Trump administration’s campaign to get allies such as Japan and Australia to shut out Huawei gear and phones helped drive sales in the Asia-Pacific down 13.9%, though that was more than offset by a surge at home in China.In the fourth quarter alone, which was most impacted by the U.S. prohibition on Huawei selling Android phones with Google’s mobile services, the company shipped roughly 55 million devices, calculated from the difference between its September shipments update and the year’s total. Of the 240 million Huawei and Honor phones shipped, 6.9 million had fifth-generation wireless networking, an area where the company remains a tech leader.Pelosi Joins Trump in Warning Europe of Huawei’s 5G ThreatContrary to warnings from American lawmakers and diplomats, numerous European countries like the U.K. and Switzerland have opted to use Huawei’s technology in building out their 5G networks. The U.K. and Germany have both echoed U.S. concerns about how far Huawei can be trusted with key infrastructure of the future, but those have not extended to the severity of an outright ban.Huawei faces tremendous pressure in overseas smartphone markets, where the U.S. ban on its use of Google Mobile Services severely undercuts the appeal of its devices. Without the Google Play Store and third-party app ecosystem, Huawei phones simply can’t compete with similarly capable alternatives from the likes of Samsung Electronics Co. and OnePlus. The company reported flat revenue in Europe, the Middle East and Africa alongside the drop in the Asia-Pacific. Those regions were two of its major growth engines in 2018, whereas now 59% of its sales are at home in China.China’s ambitious 5G network construction projects, which started in the second half of last year, also helped Huawei weather the international storm and sustain its core businesses.Huawei Makes End-Run Around U.S. Ban by Using Its Own ChipsFounder Ren Zhengfei initially estimated that Huawei’s May 2019 blacklisting by the U.S. could wipe $30 billion off annual revenues and threaten his company’s very survival, though he has tempered that outlook more recently. Huawei mobilized a massive effort to develop in-house alternatives to American software and circuitry, while U.S. suppliers like Intel Corp. and Microsoft Corp. found ways to continue supplying Huawei vital components it needed to make its products. Huawei is also selling base stations free of American technology in another effort to bypass the U.S. ban.With no relief from U.S. sanctions in sight and the coronavirus pandemic stifling business across all industries, Huawei anticipates its most difficult year yet. Chinese smartphone sales, which the company is now particularly sensitive to, are already hurting. And its global 5G installations, for which Huawei has secured more than 90 contracts worldwide, are hitting the brakes with many countries implementing lockdowns and the global economy at a standstill.(Updates with top executive’s comments from the second paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.



          

IT Infrastructure Specialist at Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.   

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Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. /ˈwɑːˌweɪ/ is a Chinese multinational networking and telecommunications equipment and services company headquartered in Shenzhen, Guangdong. It is the largest telecommunications equipment maker in the world, having overtaken Ericsson in 2012. Huawei was founded in 1987 by Ren Zhengfei, a former engineer in the People's Liberation Army. At the time of its establishment Huawei was focused on manufacturing phone switches, but has since expanded its business to include building telecommunications networks; providing operational and consulting services and equipment to enterprises inside and outside of China; and manufacturing communications devices for the consumer market. Huawei has over 140,000 employees, around 46% of whom are engaged in research and development (R&D). It has 21 R&D institutes in countries including China, the United States, Canada, UK, Pakistan, France, Germany, Colombia, Sweden, Ireland, India, Russia, and Turkey, and in 2013 invested US$5 billion in R&D. In 2010, Huawei recorded profit of 23.8 billion CNY (3.7 billion USD). Its products and services have been deployed in more than 140 countries and it currently serves 45 of the world's 50 largest telecoms operators.Roles And Responsibilities Perform daily health check (performance, CPU Usage, file system space, Memory usage) to ensure that servers are running healthy. Perform user administration and restrict system access to authorized personnel’s. Responsible for UNIX/Linux Server Administration Responsible for Storage Administration Responsible for enterprise Spare Part request handling for Technical Changes/RFC operations Installation and configuration of UNIX / Linux Systems hardware and software, in line with change and release management procedures. Maintain proper security of all UNIX Enterprise Systems as well as backup solutions Apply patches as required to keep the servers and systems up to date in coordination with OEM support whilst complying with change management process Coordinate with the vendors/service provider for support if needed according to signed maintenance contract. Participate in Capacity planning and systems enhancement for related systems. Maintain proper backup RPO and RTO based on customer agreement Planning, deployment, configuration of Backup infrastructure Setup Backup Policies and manage backup and restore operations Handle Offsite Backup Tape Management. Liaise with other teams for issues related to support or business requirements (server, storage, backup/restore, access etc...) Ensuring compliance with License agreements. Provide operational report based on agreed SLA Close all assigned service desk cases reported for systems issues with in the response and resolution time agreed in the SLA. Adherence to the Quality procedures that are agreed to be part of the service management scope. Implement Huawei Cloud solutions, Data Migration and Replication Solutions. Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity solution Deployment and Administration (Commvault/Netbackup Solutions) Cloud Platform Support and administration for VMWARE/FusionSphere/Huawei cloud ManageONE ServiceCenter and Operation Center Education And Experience B. Sc. in Computer Engineering or related courses 10 Years of experience Competence/Certifications: ITIL V3 Foundation certification UNIX: (SOLARIS/HPUX) BACKUP: ,COMMVAULT & NETBACKUP Hardware: Huawei Servers/Storages/Switches Cloud/Virtualisation : Huawei Cloud(FusionSphere),VMWARE OS: Windows, Linux, UNIX
          

MOTI anuncia oficialmente su marca de laboratorio «MOTI Lab», que puede llevar a otro nivel la confiabilidad y seguridad en el campo de los ‘pods’ para cigarrillos electrónicos   

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SHENZHEN, China, 30 de marzo de 2020 /PRNewswire/ — MOTI, marca líder en productos para «vapear» y fabricante de la industria de los cigarrillos electrónicos, anunció la inauguración de MOTI Lab. El laboratorio, enfocado en investigación y desarrollo de


          

GEODIS Establishes an Air Bridge From China to Transport Millions of Masks   

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LEVALLOIS-PERRET, France, March 31, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- GEODIS has been commissioned by the French Government to organize the emergency supply of millions of masks from China to France.

In order to respond to requests from the national authorities, GEODIS is planning 16 flights over the coming weeks, representing in volume terms approximately 2400 m3 of capacity weekly. If necessary, this schedule could be extended into the month of May.

For this operation, mounted in a record time, GEODIS has chartered two Antonov 124 aircraft which will operate in rotation between France and China. The Antonov is a plane specially designed for the transport of cargo in large quantities.

The French Minister of Solidarity and Health said on Sunday that this air bridge, was part of the expected delivery to France of 1 billion masks over the next 14 weeks.

The first flight from Shenzhen Airport in China containing 8.5 million masks arrived in France yesterday (Monday, March 30) via Paris-Vatry airport. A second flight is scheduled later this week carrying 13 million more masks.

GEODIS, a world leader in transport and logistics, is located in 67 countries and has more than 1,700 employees in China.

GEODIS - www.geodis.com [https://God.blue/forward.php?url=http://www.geodis.com/]

GEODIS is a top-rated, global supply chain operator recognized for its passion and commitment to helping clients overcome their logistical constraints. GEODIS' growth-focused offerings (Supply Chain Optimization, Freight Forwarding, Contract Logistics, Distribution & Express, and Road Transport) coupled with the company's truly global reach thanks to a direct presence in 67 countries, and a global network spanning 120 countries, translates in top business rankings, #1 in France, #4 in Europe and #7 worldwide. In 2019, GEODIS accounted for over 41,000 employees globally and generated EUR8.2 billion in sales.

LOGO: https://God.blue/forward.php?url=https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1139704/GEODIS_Logo.jpg [https://God.blue/forward.php?url=https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1139704/GEODIS_Logo.jpg]

CONTACT: PRESS CONTACT, Claire Vaas, GEODIS - Communications Department. +33 (0)6-99 -38-88-34, claire.vaas@geodis.com


          

MOTI anuncia oficialmente su marca de laboratorio «MOTI Lab», que puede llevar a otro nivel la confiabilidad y seguridad en el campo de los ‘pods’ para cigarrillos electrónicos   

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SHENZHEN, China, 30 de marzo de 2020 /PRNewswire/ — MOTI, marca líder en productos para «vapear» y fabricante de la industria de los cigarrillos electrónicos, anunció la inauguración de MOTI Lab. El laboratorio, enfocado en investigación y desarrollo de


          

HVS Report - COVID-19 and the Chinese Hotel Sector - PDF Download   

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From the beginning of 2020, Covid-19 spread in China and escalated into a global pandemic, impacting the travel, hotel, and catering industries. HVS Shenzhen Office combined existing market information and our own survey results, as well as the historical data, to determine the impact and provide an outlook on the Chinese hotel industry.
          

Red faces over copycat green report on China dredging project   

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A research institute linked to China’s top scientific body has apologised for “copying and pasting” an environmental impact assessment in a report on a controversial dredging project in the country’s south.The South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, affiliated with the Chinese Academy of Sciences, admitted on its website on Sunday that parts of another report had been “used as a model” for the Shenzhen Bay assessment, resulting in multiple references to Zhanjiang, a city about 500km (310 miles…
          

China’s housing market springs back to life as sales in 30 major cities triple with coronavirus crisis abating   

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China’s private housing market is springing back to life as more sales offices reopened across the country following a nationwide shutdown, saving home builders from a deeper financial slump this year.Transactions in at least eight large cities – Shenzhen, Chengdu, Fuzhou, Hangzhou, Huaian, Yangzhou, Jiaxing, Shantou – indicated buyers have returned in recent weeks, with volume surpassing the average levels in the final quarter of 2019, according to China Real Estate Information Corporation …
          

Coronavirus update: ups and downs   

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Guangdong added six new COVID-19 cases yesterday, all imported from overseas, four of which were in Guangzhou, and one each in Shenzhen and Foshan. Two cases were discharged. Among the 129 cases still in hospital (120 imported), 35 were light, 88 normal, 2 severe, and 4 critical, according to the Guangdong Health Commission. Hong Kong […]

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Coronavirus update: China slows, HK surges   

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Guangdong added 28 new COVID-19 cases over the weekend, all imported from overseas, 21 of which were in Guangzhou, five in Shenzhen, one each in Zhuhai and Foshan. Hospitals released 14 patients, but are still treating 125 (116 imported), of which 34 are light, 85 normal, 2 severe, and 4 critical. (Data: Guangdong Health Commission) […]

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16K to 22K, Primary school in Shenzhen, South China Job in Shenzhen   

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16K to 22K, Primary school position in Shenzhen, South China Position: Primary school teacher Location: Shenzhen city, Guangdong Province School introduction: The school is ... Save as E-mail Job Alert
          

Senior Lecturer/ Lecturer in Translation (Ref.AC2020/ 004/ 01) | The Chinese University of Hong Kong   

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Shenzhen, School of Humanities and Social Science now invites applications and nominations for: Senior Lecturer/Lecturer in Translation (Ref.AC2020/004/01) The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen is
          

Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer in English Language (Ref.AC2020/ 003/ 01) | The Chinese University of Hong Kong   

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Shenzhen, School of Humanities and Social Science now invites applications and nominations for: Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer in English Language (Ref.AC2020/003/01) The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzh
          

Leawo gibt die Richtlinien zum Schutz vor Coronaviren heraus und gewährt 40% Rabatt für Blu-ray Ripper   

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Zusammenfassung: Leawo bringt Anti-Coronavirus-Lösungen auf den Markt und bietet 40% Rabatt für Blu-ray Ripper an, um Menschen dabei zu unterstützen, 4k Blu-ray-Filme zu rippen und zu streamen, damit sie während der COVID-19-Quarantäne zu Hause Filme ansehen können. Shenzhen, China, 31. März 2020 – Mit dem raschen Ausbruch von COVID-19 wurden die Menschen ermutigt, zu Hause […]

Der Beitrag Leawo gibt die Richtlinien zum Schutz vor Coronaviren heraus und gewährt 40% Rabatt für Blu-ray Ripper erschien zuerst auf BSOZD - Autohaus | Autohandel | Auto News Premium Portale.


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