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Other: Naval Aviator - Mount Pleasant, South Carolina   

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ABOUT Search for underwater threats. Deliver payloads of incredible firepower or necessary manpower. Execute strategic aerial maneuvers anywhere from the stratosphere, to mere feet above the sea. This is just a glimpse into your career as a Naval Aviator. You also may find yourself: * Flying some of the most innovative and high-tech aircraft in the world * Providing vital attack, defense and logistic support to the Fleet * Controlling and maintaining all internal and external aircraft systems RESPONSIBILITIES Navy Pilots and Naval Flight Officers (NFOs) are important components in an exclusive, world-class group of Officers. This job will require you to perform at the best of your ability at all times. Making use of your advanced training and unparalleled knowledge to provide the utmost safety and security in the world's skies. As a Pilot, you may: * Take part in antisubmarine warfare and mine countermeasures, as well as search and rescue operations and vertical replenishment missions * Receive specialized training on the advanced tactical systems found on Navy aircraft * Project aviation power in fighter and attack, reconnaissance, and sea control missions. launching from aircraft carriers or surface combatants. * Conduct enemy surveillance by collecting photographic intelligence As an NFO, you may: * Study aerodynamics, aircraft engine systems, meteorology, navigation, flight planning and flight safety * Train and specialize in EA-18G Growler electronic countermeasures aircraft, E-2C Hawkeye early warning and control aircraft, or the new P-8A Poseidon antisubmarine aircraft * Electronically detect and track ships, submarines, aircraft and missiles WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Navy Pilot or an NFO, missions and assignments can be anywhere around the globe. This includes working from carrier battle groups, or other sea-based platforms, and at Naval Air Stations or other locations on shore. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Those entering aviation programs must first attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI, and then complete a six-week air indoctrination course at Naval Aviation Schools Command, in Pensacola, FL. From there, prospective Pilots and NFOs attend primary flight training. Pilots and NFOs then request an aircraft pipeline and enter the intermediate phase of flight training, which builds upon basic flight and navigation training. The final phase is advanced naval flight training, focusing on mission specifics. After completion, Pilots and NFOs are awarded their "wings of gold" and report to their respective Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRSs) for further training specific to their aircraft. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Following your initial flying tour as a Navy Pilot or an NFO, you can attend the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA, where you may be able to earn a master's or doctoral degree while being paid full-time. QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is required to work as a Navy Pilot or Naval Flight Officer. Candidates seeking an Officer position in this community must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in a technical field. All candidates must also be U.S. citizens, willing to serve worldwide and qualified for sea duty. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Surface Warfare Officer - Richland, Washington   

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ABOUT America's Navy has the most modern, advanced fleet of ships in the entire world. Surface Warfare Officers (SWOs) are trained extensively to maintain and operate these ships, their crews and their systems. Providing direction. Leading by example. Surface Warfare Officers form the backbone of Fleet leadership. In this role, you will have the opportunity to excel as a leader. You could serve as Commanding Officer over an elite crew and be an authority in every aspect of your Navy assignments. Doing any or all of the following: * Directing personnel operations aboard Navy vessels, such as aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, amphibious warfare ships, mine warfare ships and frigates * Managing shipboard vertical launch systems * Using computer displays and advanced technology in battle and ship defense * Providing support to Navy expeditionary forces, Theater Air Missile operations, anti-submarine warfare, surface-to-air warfare, and support and supply missions RESPONSIBILITIES Surface Warfare Officers are involved in virtually every aspect of Navy missions. As a SWO, you may be in charge of any number of shipboard operations and activities while at sea, working with or within any of these specialized forces: Aircraft Carrier Forces: Provide and coordinate air, submarine and surface ship defense for aircraft carriers Cruiser-Destroyer Forces: Provide ship attack and defensive measures with a wide array of missile and fire power capabilities, providing anti-air, -submarine and -surface warfare support Amphibious Forces: Embark and transport vehicles, equipment and personnel for amphibious assault operations Combat-Logistics Forces: Provide combatant ships with fuel, ammunition, food and supplies, and provide repair, maintenance and rescue capabilities through Fleet Support Ships Mine Warfare Forces: Detect, identify and neutralize threats from hostile use of maritime mines You may also be interested in becoming a Surface Warfare Officer within the prestigious Navy Nuclear community, where you will have the opportunity to work on some of the world's most powerful nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers. WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Surface Warfare Officer, you will work at sea and on shore, in a variety of environments. Sea duty could place you aboard ships within the fleet. Shore duty may involve a tour of duty at the Pentagon; a student assignment at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.; or command and management positions at shore bases and stations around the world. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Unless they have already been commissioned through the Naval Academy or ROTC, those pursuing a Surface Warfare Officer position are required to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, R.I. Newly commissioned SWOs can expect an advanced training process that includes comprehensive training at sea and ashore. Newly commissioned Surface Warfare Officers will be assigned to a surface ship, leading a team of Sailors responsible for a component of the ship - anything from electronics to weapons to engineering systems. In this setting, Officers are working toward full Surface Warfare qualification. After completing these initial sea tours, Surface Warfare Officers may be selected to serve on high-level staffs, commands or strategic projects, or they may be selected to work in recruitment. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. The ultimate goal for many: to one day command their own ship. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Surface Warfare Officers can advance their education by: * Pursuing opportunities at institutions such as Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) or Navy War College (NWC) * Completing Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) at one of the various service colleges QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree from an accredited U.S. college or university is required to become a Surface Warfare Officer. There are different ways to become a SWO. If you're a high school student or an undergraduate, you can enter through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) or through the U.S. Naval Academy. Those already having a degree attend Officer Candidate School (OCS), a 12-week Navy school in Newport, R.I. To be an eligible candidate, you must: * Be a U.S. citizen * Be at least 19 years of age and no older than 29 at the time of commissioning * Meet the Navy's physical standards General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Naval Aviator - Richland, Washington   

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ABOUT Search for underwater threats. Deliver payloads of incredible firepower or necessary manpower. Execute strategic aerial maneuvers anywhere from the stratosphere, to mere feet above the sea. This is just a glimpse into your career as a Naval Aviator. You also may find yourself: * Flying some of the most innovative and high-tech aircraft in the world * Providing vital attack, defense and logistic support to the Fleet * Controlling and maintaining all internal and external aircraft systems RESPONSIBILITIES Navy Pilots and Naval Flight Officers (NFOs) are important components in an exclusive, world-class group of Officers. This job will require you to perform at the best of your ability at all times. Making use of your advanced training and unparalleled knowledge to provide the utmost safety and security in the world's skies. As a Pilot, you may: * Take part in antisubmarine warfare and mine countermeasures, as well as search and rescue operations and vertical replenishment missions * Receive specialized training on the advanced tactical systems found on Navy aircraft * Project aviation power in fighter and attack, reconnaissance, and sea control missions. launching from aircraft carriers or surface combatants. * Conduct enemy surveillance by collecting photographic intelligence As an NFO, you may: * Study aerodynamics, aircraft engine systems, meteorology, navigation, flight planning and flight safety * Train and specialize in EA-18G Growler electronic countermeasures aircraft, E-2C Hawkeye early warning and control aircraft, or the new P-8A Poseidon antisubmarine aircraft * Electronically detect and track ships, submarines, aircraft and missiles WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Navy Pilot or an NFO, missions and assignments can be anywhere around the globe. This includes working from carrier battle groups, or other sea-based platforms, and at Naval Air Stations or other locations on shore. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Those entering aviation programs must first attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI, and then complete a six-week air indoctrination course at Naval Aviation Schools Command, in Pensacola, FL. From there, prospective Pilots and NFOs attend primary flight training. Pilots and NFOs then request an aircraft pipeline and enter the intermediate phase of flight training, which builds upon basic flight and navigation training. The final phase is advanced naval flight training, focusing on mission specifics. After completion, Pilots and NFOs are awarded their "wings of gold" and report to their respective Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRSs) for further training specific to their aircraft. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Following your initial flying tour as a Navy Pilot or an NFO, you can attend the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA, where you may be able to earn a master's or doctoral degree while being paid full-time. QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is required to work as a Navy Pilot or Naval Flight Officer. Candidates seeking an Officer position in this community must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in a technical field. All candidates must also be U.S. citizens, willing to serve worldwide and qualified for sea duty. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Professions: Cryptologic Technician - Richland, Washington   

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ABOUT Enlisted Sailors in the Navy Cryptology community analyze encrypted electronic communications, jam enemy radar signals, decipher information in foreign languages and maintain state-of-the-art equipment and networks used to generate top secret intel. Their other responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and reporting on communication signals * Utilizing computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment and video display terminals * Serving as an important part of the Information Dominance Corps in its mission to gain a deep understanding of the inner workings of adversaries and develop unmatched knowledge of the battlespace during wartime RESPONSIBILITIES Within Navy Cryptology, there are distinct focus areas that have their own training paths and job descriptions. Each CT role works under the oversight of Cryptologic Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required) - and potentially both. Cryptologic Technician Interpretive (CTI) - CTIs serve as experts in linguistics (including Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Persian-Farsi, Russian and Spanish) and deciphering information in other languages. Their responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and exploiting foreign language communications of interest * Transcribing, translating and interpreting foreign language materials * Providing cultural and regional guidance in support of Navy, Joint Force, national and multinational needs Cryptologic Technician Technical (CTT) - CTTs serve as experts in airborne, shipborne and land-based radar signals. Their responsibilities include: * Operating electronic intelligence-receiving and direction-finding systems, digital recording devices, analysis terminals, and associated computer equipment * Operating systems that produce high-power jamming signals used to deceive electronic sensors and defeat radar-guided weapons systems * Providing technical and tactical guidance in support of surface, subsurface, air and special warfare operations Cryptologic Technician Networks (CTN) - CTNs serve as experts in communication network defense and forensics. Their responsibilities include: * Monitoring, identifying, collecting and analyzing information * Providing computer network risk mitigation and network vulnerability assessments and incident response/reconstruction * Providing network target access tool development * Conducting computer network operations worldwide in support of Navy and Department of Defense missions Cryptologic Technician Maintenance (CTM) - CTMs serve as experts in the preventive and corrective maintenance of sophisticated cryptologic equipment, networks and systems. Their responsibilities include: * Installing, testing, troubleshooting, repairing or replacing cryptologic networks, physical security systems, electronic equipment, antennas, personal computers, auxiliary equipment, digital and optical interfaces, and data systems * Configuring, monitoring and evaluating Information Operations (IO), Information Warfare (IW) systems and Information Assurance (IA) operations Cryptologic Technician Collection (CTR) - CTRs serve as experts in intercepting signals. Their responsibilities include: * Analyzing and reporting on communication signals using computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment, video display terminals and electronic/magnetic tape recorders * Exploiting signals of interest to identify, locate and report worldwide threats * Providing tactical and strategic signals intelligence, technical guidance, and information warfare support to surface, subsurface, air and special warfare units. WORK ENVIRONMENT Cryptologic Technicians perform a variety of duties worldwide, at numerous overseas and stateside shore commands; aboard surface ships, aircraft and submarines; and with Naval Special Warfare - generally dividing time between assignments ashore and afloat. Duties could be performed in an office setting, lab-type setting, specialized maintenance shop, secure space or watch environment. As a CT, you may work independently or as part of small, coordinated teams - ultimately under the supervision of Information Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required). TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Upon completion of initial 7-9 week Recruit Training (known as Boot Camp), those pursuing a Cryptologic Technician role report to either Pensacola, Fla., or Monterey, Calif., to receive formal Navy schooling in their specialty area within the field of cryptology. This consists of technical "A" School and possibly advanced "C" School or "F" School. CTI training - Class "A" School is broken into two phases. Phase One takes place at the Defense Language Institute, Monterey, Calif., and is anywhere from 27 to 64 weeks long. Phase Two is 12 weeks long. Class "F" School is conducted at the Regional Center for Excellence in Monterey, Calif. CTT training - Class "A" School is approximately 17 weeks long. After "A" school, some CTTs will attend a Class "C" School that is approximately 26 weeks in duration. The schools are located in Pensacola, Fla. CTN training - Class "A" School is 26 weeks long and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTM training - Class "A" School is approximately 10 weeks in duration and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTR training - Class "A" School is approximately 22 weeks long. The school is located in Pensacola, Fla. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. To learn more about the specific training path for any of the focus areas within the field of cryptology, locate a recruiter. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond offering access to professional credentials and certifications, Navy technical and operational training in the field of intelligence can translate to credit hours toward a bachelor's or associate degree through the American Council on Education. You may also continue your education through opportunities like the following: * Navy College Program and Tuition Assistance * Post-9/11 GI Bill QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is not required to become a member of the Navy electronics community. There are some specific requirements that apply to electronics jobs in advanced programs such as SECF and NF. Contact a recruiter for details. A high school diploma or equivalent is required to become an Enlisted Sailor in the cryptology field in the Navy. Those seeking a Cryptologic Technician position must be U.S. citizens who can meet eligibility requirements for a Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information security clearance. They should have an interest in advanced electronics and technology; exceptionally good character; good speaking, writing and record-keeping skills; a good working aptitude of math; and the capability to do highly detail-oriented, highly classified work. Specific qualifications vary depending upon specialization area within the field of cryptology. Contact a recruiter for details. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Naval Aviator - Terre Haute, Indiana   

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ABOUT Search for underwater threats. Deliver payloads of incredible firepower or necessary manpower. Execute strategic aerial maneuvers anywhere from the stratosphere, to mere feet above the sea. This is just a glimpse into your career as a Naval Aviator. You also may find yourself: * Flying some of the most innovative and high-tech aircraft in the world * Providing vital attack, defense and logistic support to the Fleet * Controlling and maintaining all internal and external aircraft systems RESPONSIBILITIES Navy Pilots and Naval Flight Officers (NFOs) are important components in an exclusive, world-class group of Officers. This job will require you to perform at the best of your ability at all times. Making use of your advanced training and unparalleled knowledge to provide the utmost safety and security in the world's skies. As a Pilot, you may: * Take part in antisubmarine warfare and mine countermeasures, as well as search and rescue operations and vertical replenishment missions * Receive specialized training on the advanced tactical systems found on Navy aircraft * Project aviation power in fighter and attack, reconnaissance, and sea control missions. launching from aircraft carriers or surface combatants. * Conduct enemy surveillance by collecting photographic intelligence As an NFO, you may: * Study aerodynamics, aircraft engine systems, meteorology, navigation, flight planning and flight safety * Train and specialize in EA-18G Growler electronic countermeasures aircraft, E-2C Hawkeye early warning and control aircraft, or the new P-8A Poseidon antisubmarine aircraft * Electronically detect and track ships, submarines, aircraft and missiles WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Navy Pilot or an NFO, missions and assignments can be anywhere around the globe. This includes working from carrier battle groups, or other sea-based platforms, and at Naval Air Stations or other locations on shore. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Those entering aviation programs must first attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI, and then complete a six-week air indoctrination course at Naval Aviation Schools Command, in Pensacola, FL. From there, prospective Pilots and NFOs attend primary flight training. Pilots and NFOs then request an aircraft pipeline and enter the intermediate phase of flight training, which builds upon basic flight and navigation training. The final phase is advanced naval flight training, focusing on mission specifics. After completion, Pilots and NFOs are awarded their "wings of gold" and report to their respective Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRSs) for further training specific to their aircraft. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Following your initial flying tour as a Navy Pilot or an NFO, you can attend the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA, where you may be able to earn a master's or doctoral degree while being paid full-time. QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is required to work as a Navy Pilot or Naval Flight Officer. Candidates seeking an Officer position in this community must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in a technical field. All candidates must also be U.S. citizens, willing to serve worldwide and qualified for sea duty. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Monarch Butterfly Researchers Need Your Photos   

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The Western monarch butterfly’s life is a story that every California school child knows: After wintering in Monterey County and other spots along the Central Coast, the regal insects fan out to breeding grounds in the Central Valley and beyond. But there’s a monarch mystery: No one is certain what happens to the butterflies during... Read more »

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Professions: Cryptologic Technician - Sioux City, Iowa   

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ABOUT Enlisted Sailors in the Navy Cryptology community analyze encrypted electronic communications, jam enemy radar signals, decipher information in foreign languages and maintain state-of-the-art equipment and networks used to generate top secret intel. Their other responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and reporting on communication signals * Utilizing computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment and video display terminals * Serving as an important part of the Information Dominance Corps in its mission to gain a deep understanding of the inner workings of adversaries and develop unmatched knowledge of the battlespace during wartime RESPONSIBILITIES Within Navy Cryptology, there are distinct focus areas that have their own training paths and job descriptions. Each CT role works under the oversight of Cryptologic Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required) - and potentially both. Cryptologic Technician Interpretive (CTI) - CTIs serve as experts in linguistics (including Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Persian-Farsi, Russian and Spanish) and deciphering information in other languages. Their responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and exploiting foreign language communications of interest * Transcribing, translating and interpreting foreign language materials * Providing cultural and regional guidance in support of Navy, Joint Force, national and multinational needs Cryptologic Technician Technical (CTT) - CTTs serve as experts in airborne, shipborne and land-based radar signals. Their responsibilities include: * Operating electronic intelligence-receiving and direction-finding systems, digital recording devices, analysis terminals, and associated computer equipment * Operating systems that produce high-power jamming signals used to deceive electronic sensors and defeat radar-guided weapons systems * Providing technical and tactical guidance in support of surface, subsurface, air and special warfare operations Cryptologic Technician Networks (CTN) - CTNs serve as experts in communication network defense and forensics. Their responsibilities include: * Monitoring, identifying, collecting and analyzing information * Providing computer network risk mitigation and network vulnerability assessments and incident response/reconstruction * Providing network target access tool development * Conducting computer network operations worldwide in support of Navy and Department of Defense missions Cryptologic Technician Maintenance (CTM) - CTMs serve as experts in the preventive and corrective maintenance of sophisticated cryptologic equipment, networks and systems. Their responsibilities include: * Installing, testing, troubleshooting, repairing or replacing cryptologic networks, physical security systems, electronic equipment, antennas, personal computers, auxiliary equipment, digital and optical interfaces, and data systems * Configuring, monitoring and evaluating Information Operations (IO), Information Warfare (IW) systems and Information Assurance (IA) operations Cryptologic Technician Collection (CTR) - CTRs serve as experts in intercepting signals. Their responsibilities include: * Analyzing and reporting on communication signals using computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment, video display terminals and electronic/magnetic tape recorders * Exploiting signals of interest to identify, locate and report worldwide threats * Providing tactical and strategic signals intelligence, technical guidance, and information warfare support to surface, subsurface, air and special warfare units. WORK ENVIRONMENT Cryptologic Technicians perform a variety of duties worldwide, at numerous overseas and stateside shore commands; aboard surface ships, aircraft and submarines; and with Naval Special Warfare - generally dividing time between assignments ashore and afloat. Duties could be performed in an office setting, lab-type setting, specialized maintenance shop, secure space or watch environment. As a CT, you may work independently or as part of small, coordinated teams - ultimately under the supervision of Information Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required). TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Upon completion of initial 7-9 week Recruit Training (known as Boot Camp), those pursuing a Cryptologic Technician role report to either Pensacola, Fla., or Monterey, Calif., to receive formal Navy schooling in their specialty area within the field of cryptology. This consists of technical "A" School and possibly advanced "C" School or "F" School. CTI training - Class "A" School is broken into two phases. Phase One takes place at the Defense Language Institute, Monterey, Calif., and is anywhere from 27 to 64 weeks long. Phase Two is 12 weeks long. Class "F" School is conducted at the Regional Center for Excellence in Monterey, Calif. CTT training - Class "A" School is approximately 17 weeks long. After "A" school, some CTTs will attend a Class "C" School that is approximately 26 weeks in duration. The schools are located in Pensacola, Fla. CTN training - Class "A" School is 26 weeks long and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTM training - Class "A" School is approximately 10 weeks in duration and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTR training - Class "A" School is approximately 22 weeks long. The school is located in Pensacola, Fla. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. To learn more about the specific training path for any of the focus areas within the field of cryptology, locate a recruiter. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond offering access to professional credentials and certifications, Navy technical and operational training in the field of intelligence can translate to credit hours toward a bachelor's or associate degree through the American Council on Education. You may also continue your education through opportunities like the following: * Navy College Program and Tuition Assistance * Post-9/11 GI Bill QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is not required to become a member of the Navy electronics community. There are some specific requirements that apply to electronics jobs in advanced programs such as SECF and NF. Contact a recruiter for details. A high school diploma or equivalent is required to become an Enlisted Sailor in the cryptology field in the Navy. Those seeking a Cryptologic Technician position must be U.S. citizens who can meet eligibility requirements for a Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information security clearance. They should have an interest in advanced electronics and technology; exceptionally good character; good speaking, writing and record-keeping skills; a good working aptitude of math; and the capability to do highly detail-oriented, highly classified work. Specific qualifications vary depending upon specialization area within the field of cryptology. Contact a recruiter for details. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Naval Aviator - Sioux City, Iowa   

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ABOUT Search for underwater threats. Deliver payloads of incredible firepower or necessary manpower. Execute strategic aerial maneuvers anywhere from the stratosphere, to mere feet above the sea. This is just a glimpse into your career as a Naval Aviator. You also may find yourself: * Flying some of the most innovative and high-tech aircraft in the world * Providing vital attack, defense and logistic support to the Fleet * Controlling and maintaining all internal and external aircraft systems RESPONSIBILITIES Navy Pilots and Naval Flight Officers (NFOs) are important components in an exclusive, world-class group of Officers. This job will require you to perform at the best of your ability at all times. Making use of your advanced training and unparalleled knowledge to provide the utmost safety and security in the world's skies. As a Pilot, you may: * Take part in antisubmarine warfare and mine countermeasures, as well as search and rescue operations and vertical replenishment missions * Receive specialized training on the advanced tactical systems found on Navy aircraft * Project aviation power in fighter and attack, reconnaissance, and sea control missions. launching from aircraft carriers or surface combatants. * Conduct enemy surveillance by collecting photographic intelligence As an NFO, you may: * Study aerodynamics, aircraft engine systems, meteorology, navigation, flight planning and flight safety * Train and specialize in EA-18G Growler electronic countermeasures aircraft, E-2C Hawkeye early warning and control aircraft, or the new P-8A Poseidon antisubmarine aircraft * Electronically detect and track ships, submarines, aircraft and missiles WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Navy Pilot or an NFO, missions and assignments can be anywhere around the globe. This includes working from carrier battle groups, or other sea-based platforms, and at Naval Air Stations or other locations on shore. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Those entering aviation programs must first attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI, and then complete a six-week air indoctrination course at Naval Aviation Schools Command, in Pensacola, FL. From there, prospective Pilots and NFOs attend primary flight training. Pilots and NFOs then request an aircraft pipeline and enter the intermediate phase of flight training, which builds upon basic flight and navigation training. The final phase is advanced naval flight training, focusing on mission specifics. After completion, Pilots and NFOs are awarded their "wings of gold" and report to their respective Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRSs) for further training specific to their aircraft. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Following your initial flying tour as a Navy Pilot or an NFO, you can attend the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA, where you may be able to earn a master's or doctoral degree while being paid full-time. QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is required to work as a Navy Pilot or Naval Flight Officer. Candidates seeking an Officer position in this community must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in a technical field. All candidates must also be U.S. citizens, willing to serve worldwide and qualified for sea duty. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Surface Warfare Officer - Sioux City, Iowa   

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ABOUT America's Navy has the most modern, advanced fleet of ships in the entire world. Surface Warfare Officers (SWOs) are trained extensively to maintain and operate these ships, their crews and their systems. Providing direction. Leading by example. Surface Warfare Officers form the backbone of Fleet leadership. In this role, you will have the opportunity to excel as a leader. You could serve as Commanding Officer over an elite crew and be an authority in every aspect of your Navy assignments. Doing any or all of the following: * Directing personnel operations aboard Navy vessels, such as aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, amphibious warfare ships, mine warfare ships and frigates * Managing shipboard vertical launch systems * Using computer displays and advanced technology in battle and ship defense * Providing support to Navy expeditionary forces, Theater Air Missile operations, anti-submarine warfare, surface-to-air warfare, and support and supply missions RESPONSIBILITIES Surface Warfare Officers are involved in virtually every aspect of Navy missions. As a SWO, you may be in charge of any number of shipboard operations and activities while at sea, working with or within any of these specialized forces: Aircraft Carrier Forces: Provide and coordinate air, submarine and surface ship defense for aircraft carriers Cruiser-Destroyer Forces: Provide ship attack and defensive measures with a wide array of missile and fire power capabilities, providing anti-air, -submarine and -surface warfare support Amphibious Forces: Embark and transport vehicles, equipment and personnel for amphibious assault operations Combat-Logistics Forces: Provide combatant ships with fuel, ammunition, food and supplies, and provide repair, maintenance and rescue capabilities through Fleet Support Ships Mine Warfare Forces: Detect, identify and neutralize threats from hostile use of maritime mines You may also be interested in becoming a Surface Warfare Officer within the prestigious Navy Nuclear community, where you will have the opportunity to work on some of the world's most powerful nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers. WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Surface Warfare Officer, you will work at sea and on shore, in a variety of environments. Sea duty could place you aboard ships within the fleet. Shore duty may involve a tour of duty at the Pentagon; a student assignment at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.; or command and management positions at shore bases and stations around the world. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Unless they have already been commissioned through the Naval Academy or ROTC, those pursuing a Surface Warfare Officer position are required to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, R.I. Newly commissioned SWOs can expect an advanced training process that includes comprehensive training at sea and ashore. Newly commissioned Surface Warfare Officers will be assigned to a surface ship, leading a team of Sailors responsible for a component of the ship - anything from electronics to weapons to engineering systems. In this setting, Officers are working toward full Surface Warfare qualification. After completing these initial sea tours, Surface Warfare Officers may be selected to serve on high-level staffs, commands or strategic projects, or they may be selected to work in recruitment. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. The ultimate goal for many: to one day command their own ship. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Surface Warfare Officers can advance their education by: * Pursuing opportunities at institutions such as Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) or Navy War College (NWC) * Completing Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) at one of the various service colleges QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree from an accredited U.S. college or university is required to become a Surface Warfare Officer. There are different ways to become a SWO. If you're a high school student or an undergraduate, you can enter through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) or through the U.S. Naval Academy. Those already having a degree attend Officer Candidate School (OCS), a 12-week Navy school in Newport, R.I. To be an eligible candidate, you must: * Be a U.S. citizen * Be at least 19 years of age and no older than 29 at the time of commissioning * Meet the Navy's physical standards General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Professions: Cryptologic Technician - Wyoming, Michigan   

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ABOUT Enlisted Sailors in the Navy Cryptology community analyze encrypted electronic communications, jam enemy radar signals, decipher information in foreign languages and maintain state-of-the-art equipment and networks used to generate top secret intel. Their other responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and reporting on communication signals * Utilizing computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment and video display terminals * Serving as an important part of the Information Dominance Corps in its mission to gain a deep understanding of the inner workings of adversaries and develop unmatched knowledge of the battlespace during wartime RESPONSIBILITIES Within Navy Cryptology, there are distinct focus areas that have their own training paths and job descriptions. Each CT role works under the oversight of Cryptologic Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required) - and potentially both. Cryptologic Technician Interpretive (CTI) - CTIs serve as experts in linguistics (including Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Persian-Farsi, Russian and Spanish) and deciphering information in other languages. Their responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and exploiting foreign language communications of interest * Transcribing, translating and interpreting foreign language materials * Providing cultural and regional guidance in support of Navy, Joint Force, national and multinational needs Cryptologic Technician Technical (CTT) - CTTs serve as experts in airborne, shipborne and land-based radar signals. Their responsibilities include: * Operating electronic intelligence-receiving and direction-finding systems, digital recording devices, analysis terminals, and associated computer equipment * Operating systems that produce high-power jamming signals used to deceive electronic sensors and defeat radar-guided weapons systems * Providing technical and tactical guidance in support of surface, subsurface, air and special warfare operations Cryptologic Technician Networks (CTN) - CTNs serve as experts in communication network defense and forensics. Their responsibilities include: * Monitoring, identifying, collecting and analyzing information * Providing computer network risk mitigation and network vulnerability assessments and incident response/reconstruction * Providing network target access tool development * Conducting computer network operations worldwide in support of Navy and Department of Defense missions Cryptologic Technician Maintenance (CTM) - CTMs serve as experts in the preventive and corrective maintenance of sophisticated cryptologic equipment, networks and systems. Their responsibilities include: * Installing, testing, troubleshooting, repairing or replacing cryptologic networks, physical security systems, electronic equipment, antennas, personal computers, auxiliary equipment, digital and optical interfaces, and data systems * Configuring, monitoring and evaluating Information Operations (IO), Information Warfare (IW) systems and Information Assurance (IA) operations Cryptologic Technician Collection (CTR) - CTRs serve as experts in intercepting signals. Their responsibilities include: * Analyzing and reporting on communication signals using computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment, video display terminals and electronic/magnetic tape recorders * Exploiting signals of interest to identify, locate and report worldwide threats * Providing tactical and strategic signals intelligence, technical guidance, and information warfare support to surface, subsurface, air and special warfare units. WORK ENVIRONMENT Cryptologic Technicians perform a variety of duties worldwide, at numerous overseas and stateside shore commands; aboard surface ships, aircraft and submarines; and with Naval Special Warfare - generally dividing time between assignments ashore and afloat. Duties could be performed in an office setting, lab-type setting, specialized maintenance shop, secure space or watch environment. As a CT, you may work independently or as part of small, coordinated teams - ultimately under the supervision of Information Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required). TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Upon completion of initial 7-9 week Recruit Training (known as Boot Camp), those pursuing a Cryptologic Technician role report to either Pensacola, Fla., or Monterey, Calif., to receive formal Navy schooling in their specialty area within the field of cryptology. This consists of technical "A" School and possibly advanced "C" School or "F" School. CTI training - Class "A" School is broken into two phases. Phase One takes place at the Defense Language Institute, Monterey, Calif., and is anywhere from 27 to 64 weeks long. Phase Two is 12 weeks long. Class "F" School is conducted at the Regional Center for Excellence in Monterey, Calif. CTT training - Class "A" School is approximately 17 weeks long. After "A" school, some CTTs will attend a Class "C" School that is approximately 26 weeks in duration. The schools are located in Pensacola, Fla. CTN training - Class "A" School is 26 weeks long and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTM training - Class "A" School is approximately 10 weeks in duration and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTR training - Class "A" School is approximately 22 weeks long. The school is located in Pensacola, Fla. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. To learn more about the specific training path for any of the focus areas within the field of cryptology, locate a recruiter. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond offering access to professional credentials and certifications, Navy technical and operational training in the field of intelligence can translate to credit hours toward a bachelor's or associate degree through the American Council on Education. You may also continue your education through opportunities like the following: * Navy College Program and Tuition Assistance * Post-9/11 GI Bill QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is not required to become a member of the Navy electronics community. There are some specific requirements that apply to electronics jobs in advanced programs such as SECF and NF. Contact a recruiter for details. A high school diploma or equivalent is required to become an Enlisted Sailor in the cryptology field in the Navy. Those seeking a Cryptologic Technician position must be U.S. citizens who can meet eligibility requirements for a Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information security clearance. They should have an interest in advanced electronics and technology; exceptionally good character; good speaking, writing and record-keeping skills; a good working aptitude of math; and the capability to do highly detail-oriented, highly classified work. Specific qualifications vary depending upon specialization area within the field of cryptology. Contact a recruiter for details. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Surface Warfare Officer - Wyoming, Michigan   

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ABOUT America's Navy has the most modern, advanced fleet of ships in the entire world. Surface Warfare Officers (SWOs) are trained extensively to maintain and operate these ships, their crews and their systems. Providing direction. Leading by example. Surface Warfare Officers form the backbone of Fleet leadership. In this role, you will have the opportunity to excel as a leader. You could serve as Commanding Officer over an elite crew and be an authority in every aspect of your Navy assignments. Doing any or all of the following: * Directing personnel operations aboard Navy vessels, such as aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, amphibious warfare ships, mine warfare ships and frigates * Managing shipboard vertical launch systems * Using computer displays and advanced technology in battle and ship defense * Providing support to Navy expeditionary forces, Theater Air Missile operations, anti-submarine warfare, surface-to-air warfare, and support and supply missions RESPONSIBILITIES Surface Warfare Officers are involved in virtually every aspect of Navy missions. As a SWO, you may be in charge of any number of shipboard operations and activities while at sea, working with or within any of these specialized forces: Aircraft Carrier Forces: Provide and coordinate air, submarine and surface ship defense for aircraft carriers Cruiser-Destroyer Forces: Provide ship attack and defensive measures with a wide array of missile and fire power capabilities, providing anti-air, -submarine and -surface warfare support Amphibious Forces: Embark and transport vehicles, equipment and personnel for amphibious assault operations Combat-Logistics Forces: Provide combatant ships with fuel, ammunition, food and supplies, and provide repair, maintenance and rescue capabilities through Fleet Support Ships Mine Warfare Forces: Detect, identify and neutralize threats from hostile use of maritime mines You may also be interested in becoming a Surface Warfare Officer within the prestigious Navy Nuclear community, where you will have the opportunity to work on some of the world's most powerful nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers. WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Surface Warfare Officer, you will work at sea and on shore, in a variety of environments. Sea duty could place you aboard ships within the fleet. Shore duty may involve a tour of duty at the Pentagon; a student assignment at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.; or command and management positions at shore bases and stations around the world. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Unless they have already been commissioned through the Naval Academy or ROTC, those pursuing a Surface Warfare Officer position are required to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, R.I. Newly commissioned SWOs can expect an advanced training process that includes comprehensive training at sea and ashore. Newly commissioned Surface Warfare Officers will be assigned to a surface ship, leading a team of Sailors responsible for a component of the ship - anything from electronics to weapons to engineering systems. In this setting, Officers are working toward full Surface Warfare qualification. After completing these initial sea tours, Surface Warfare Officers may be selected to serve on high-level staffs, commands or strategic projects, or they may be selected to work in recruitment. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. The ultimate goal for many: to one day command their own ship. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Surface Warfare Officers can advance their education by: * Pursuing opportunities at institutions such as Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) or Navy War College (NWC) * Completing Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) at one of the various service colleges QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree from an accredited U.S. college or university is required to become a Surface Warfare Officer. There are different ways to become a SWO. If you're a high school student or an undergraduate, you can enter through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) or through the U.S. Naval Academy. Those already having a degree attend Officer Candidate School (OCS), a 12-week Navy school in Newport, R.I. To be an eligible candidate, you must: * Be a U.S. citizen * Be at least 19 years of age and no older than 29 at the time of commissioning * Meet the Navy's physical standards General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Professions: Cryptologic Technician - Olathe, Kansas   

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ABOUT Enlisted Sailors in the Navy Cryptology community analyze encrypted electronic communications, jam enemy radar signals, decipher information in foreign languages and maintain state-of-the-art equipment and networks used to generate top secret intel. Their other responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and reporting on communication signals * Utilizing computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment and video display terminals * Serving as an important part of the Information Dominance Corps in its mission to gain a deep understanding of the inner workings of adversaries and develop unmatched knowledge of the battlespace during wartime RESPONSIBILITIES Within Navy Cryptology, there are distinct focus areas that have their own training paths and job descriptions. Each CT role works under the oversight of Cryptologic Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required) - and potentially both. Cryptologic Technician Interpretive (CTI) - CTIs serve as experts in linguistics (including Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Persian-Farsi, Russian and Spanish) and deciphering information in other languages. Their responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and exploiting foreign language communications of interest * Transcribing, translating and interpreting foreign language materials * Providing cultural and regional guidance in support of Navy, Joint Force, national and multinational needs Cryptologic Technician Technical (CTT) - CTTs serve as experts in airborne, shipborne and land-based radar signals. Their responsibilities include: * Operating electronic intelligence-receiving and direction-finding systems, digital recording devices, analysis terminals, and associated computer equipment * Operating systems that produce high-power jamming signals used to deceive electronic sensors and defeat radar-guided weapons systems * Providing technical and tactical guidance in support of surface, subsurface, air and special warfare operations Cryptologic Technician Networks (CTN) - CTNs serve as experts in communication network defense and forensics. Their responsibilities include: * Monitoring, identifying, collecting and analyzing information * Providing computer network risk mitigation and network vulnerability assessments and incident response/reconstruction * Providing network target access tool development * Conducting computer network operations worldwide in support of Navy and Department of Defense missions Cryptologic Technician Maintenance (CTM) - CTMs serve as experts in the preventive and corrective maintenance of sophisticated cryptologic equipment, networks and systems. Their responsibilities include: * Installing, testing, troubleshooting, repairing or replacing cryptologic networks, physical security systems, electronic equipment, antennas, personal computers, auxiliary equipment, digital and optical interfaces, and data systems * Configuring, monitoring and evaluating Information Operations (IO), Information Warfare (IW) systems and Information Assurance (IA) operations Cryptologic Technician Collection (CTR) - CTRs serve as experts in intercepting signals. Their responsibilities include: * Analyzing and reporting on communication signals using computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment, video display terminals and electronic/magnetic tape recorders * Exploiting signals of interest to identify, locate and report worldwide threats * Providing tactical and strategic signals intelligence, technical guidance, and information warfare support to surface, subsurface, air and special warfare units. WORK ENVIRONMENT Cryptologic Technicians perform a variety of duties worldwide, at numerous overseas and stateside shore commands; aboard surface ships, aircraft and submarines; and with Naval Special Warfare - generally dividing time between assignments ashore and afloat. Duties could be performed in an office setting, lab-type setting, specialized maintenance shop, secure space or watch environment. As a CT, you may work independently or as part of small, coordinated teams - ultimately under the supervision of Information Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required). TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Upon completion of initial 7-9 week Recruit Training (known as Boot Camp), those pursuing a Cryptologic Technician role report to either Pensacola, Fla., or Monterey, Calif., to receive formal Navy schooling in their specialty area within the field of cryptology. This consists of technical "A" School and possibly advanced "C" School or "F" School. CTI training - Class "A" School is broken into two phases. Phase One takes place at the Defense Language Institute, Monterey, Calif., and is anywhere from 27 to 64 weeks long. Phase Two is 12 weeks long. Class "F" School is conducted at the Regional Center for Excellence in Monterey, Calif. CTT training - Class "A" School is approximately 17 weeks long. After "A" school, some CTTs will attend a Class "C" School that is approximately 26 weeks in duration. The schools are located in Pensacola, Fla. CTN training - Class "A" School is 26 weeks long and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTM training - Class "A" School is approximately 10 weeks in duration and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTR training - Class "A" School is approximately 22 weeks long. The school is located in Pensacola, Fla. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. To learn more about the specific training path for any of the focus areas within the field of cryptology, locate a recruiter. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond offering access to professional credentials and certifications, Navy technical and operational training in the field of intelligence can translate to credit hours toward a bachelor's or associate degree through the American Council on Education. You may also continue your education through opportunities like the following: * Navy College Program and Tuition Assistance * Post-9/11 GI Bill QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is not required to become a member of the Navy electronics community. There are some specific requirements that apply to electronics jobs in advanced programs such as SECF and NF. Contact a recruiter for details. A high school diploma or equivalent is required to become an Enlisted Sailor in the cryptology field in the Navy. Those seeking a Cryptologic Technician position must be U.S. citizens who can meet eligibility requirements for a Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information security clearance. They should have an interest in advanced electronics and technology; exceptionally good character; good speaking, writing and record-keeping skills; a good working aptitude of math; and the capability to do highly detail-oriented, highly classified work. Specific qualifications vary depending upon specialization area within the field of cryptology. Contact a recruiter for details. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Naval Aviator - Olathe, Kansas   

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ABOUT Search for underwater threats. Deliver payloads of incredible firepower or necessary manpower. Execute strategic aerial maneuvers anywhere from the stratosphere, to mere feet above the sea. This is just a glimpse into your career as a Naval Aviator. You also may find yourself: * Flying some of the most innovative and high-tech aircraft in the world * Providing vital attack, defense and logistic support to the Fleet * Controlling and maintaining all internal and external aircraft systems RESPONSIBILITIES Navy Pilots and Naval Flight Officers (NFOs) are important components in an exclusive, world-class group of Officers. This job will require you to perform at the best of your ability at all times. Making use of your advanced training and unparalleled knowledge to provide the utmost safety and security in the world's skies. As a Pilot, you may: * Take part in antisubmarine warfare and mine countermeasures, as well as search and rescue operations and vertical replenishment missions * Receive specialized training on the advanced tactical systems found on Navy aircraft * Project aviation power in fighter and attack, reconnaissance, and sea control missions. launching from aircraft carriers or surface combatants. * Conduct enemy surveillance by collecting photographic intelligence As an NFO, you may: * Study aerodynamics, aircraft engine systems, meteorology, navigation, flight planning and flight safety * Train and specialize in EA-18G Growler electronic countermeasures aircraft, E-2C Hawkeye early warning and control aircraft, or the new P-8A Poseidon antisubmarine aircraft * Electronically detect and track ships, submarines, aircraft and missiles WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Navy Pilot or an NFO, missions and assignments can be anywhere around the globe. This includes working from carrier battle groups, or other sea-based platforms, and at Naval Air Stations or other locations on shore. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Those entering aviation programs must first attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI, and then complete a six-week air indoctrination course at Naval Aviation Schools Command, in Pensacola, FL. From there, prospective Pilots and NFOs attend primary flight training. Pilots and NFOs then request an aircraft pipeline and enter the intermediate phase of flight training, which builds upon basic flight and navigation training. The final phase is advanced naval flight training, focusing on mission specifics. After completion, Pilots and NFOs are awarded their "wings of gold" and report to their respective Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRSs) for further training specific to their aircraft. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Following your initial flying tour as a Navy Pilot or an NFO, you can attend the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA, where you may be able to earn a master's or doctoral degree while being paid full-time. QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is required to work as a Navy Pilot or Naval Flight Officer. Candidates seeking an Officer position in this community must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in a technical field. All candidates must also be U.S. citizens, willing to serve worldwide and qualified for sea duty. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Surface Warfare Officer - Olathe, Kansas   

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ABOUT America's Navy has the most modern, advanced fleet of ships in the entire world. Surface Warfare Officers (SWOs) are trained extensively to maintain and operate these ships, their crews and their systems. Providing direction. Leading by example. Surface Warfare Officers form the backbone of Fleet leadership. In this role, you will have the opportunity to excel as a leader. You could serve as Commanding Officer over an elite crew and be an authority in every aspect of your Navy assignments. Doing any or all of the following: * Directing personnel operations aboard Navy vessels, such as aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, amphibious warfare ships, mine warfare ships and frigates * Managing shipboard vertical launch systems * Using computer displays and advanced technology in battle and ship defense * Providing support to Navy expeditionary forces, Theater Air Missile operations, anti-submarine warfare, surface-to-air warfare, and support and supply missions RESPONSIBILITIES Surface Warfare Officers are involved in virtually every aspect of Navy missions. As a SWO, you may be in charge of any number of shipboard operations and activities while at sea, working with or within any of these specialized forces: Aircraft Carrier Forces: Provide and coordinate air, submarine and surface ship defense for aircraft carriers Cruiser-Destroyer Forces: Provide ship attack and defensive measures with a wide array of missile and fire power capabilities, providing anti-air, -submarine and -surface warfare support Amphibious Forces: Embark and transport vehicles, equipment and personnel for amphibious assault operations Combat-Logistics Forces: Provide combatant ships with fuel, ammunition, food and supplies, and provide repair, maintenance and rescue capabilities through Fleet Support Ships Mine Warfare Forces: Detect, identify and neutralize threats from hostile use of maritime mines You may also be interested in becoming a Surface Warfare Officer within the prestigious Navy Nuclear community, where you will have the opportunity to work on some of the world's most powerful nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers. WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Surface Warfare Officer, you will work at sea and on shore, in a variety of environments. Sea duty could place you aboard ships within the fleet. Shore duty may involve a tour of duty at the Pentagon; a student assignment at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.; or command and management positions at shore bases and stations around the world. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Unless they have already been commissioned through the Naval Academy or ROTC, those pursuing a Surface Warfare Officer position are required to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, R.I. Newly commissioned SWOs can expect an advanced training process that includes comprehensive training at sea and ashore. Newly commissioned Surface Warfare Officers will be assigned to a surface ship, leading a team of Sailors responsible for a component of the ship - anything from electronics to weapons to engineering systems. In this setting, Officers are working toward full Surface Warfare qualification. After completing these initial sea tours, Surface Warfare Officers may be selected to serve on high-level staffs, commands or strategic projects, or they may be selected to work in recruitment. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. The ultimate goal for many: to one day command their own ship. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Surface Warfare Officers can advance their education by: * Pursuing opportunities at institutions such as Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) or Navy War College (NWC) * Completing Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) at one of the various service colleges QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree from an accredited U.S. college or university is required to become a Surface Warfare Officer. There are different ways to become a SWO. If you're a high school student or an undergraduate, you can enter through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) or through the U.S. Naval Academy. Those already having a degree attend Officer Candidate School (OCS), a 12-week Navy school in Newport, R.I. To be an eligible candidate, you must: * Be a U.S. citizen * Be at least 19 years of age and no older than 29 at the time of commissioning * Meet the Navy's physical standards General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

2006 Chevrolet Corvette - Atlanta GA   

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SEE MORE PHOTOS OF THIS VETTE AND 100+ OTHERS FOR SALE AT WWW.BUYAVETTE.NET! Monterey Red exterior, ...
          

Other: Surface Warfare Officer - Kennewick, Washington   

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ABOUT America's Navy has the most modern, advanced fleet of ships in the entire world. Surface Warfare Officers (SWOs) are trained extensively to maintain and operate these ships, their crews and their systems. Providing direction. Leading by example. Surface Warfare Officers form the backbone of Fleet leadership. In this role, you will have the opportunity to excel as a leader. You could serve as Commanding Officer over an elite crew and be an authority in every aspect of your Navy assignments. Doing any or all of the following: * Directing personnel operations aboard Navy vessels, such as aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, amphibious warfare ships, mine warfare ships and frigates * Managing shipboard vertical launch systems * Using computer displays and advanced technology in battle and ship defense * Providing support to Navy expeditionary forces, Theater Air Missile operations, anti-submarine warfare, surface-to-air warfare, and support and supply missions RESPONSIBILITIES Surface Warfare Officers are involved in virtually every aspect of Navy missions. As a SWO, you may be in charge of any number of shipboard operations and activities while at sea, working with or within any of these specialized forces: Aircraft Carrier Forces: Provide and coordinate air, submarine and surface ship defense for aircraft carriers Cruiser-Destroyer Forces: Provide ship attack and defensive measures with a wide array of missile and fire power capabilities, providing anti-air, -submarine and -surface warfare support Amphibious Forces: Embark and transport vehicles, equipment and personnel for amphibious assault operations Combat-Logistics Forces: Provide combatant ships with fuel, ammunition, food and supplies, and provide repair, maintenance and rescue capabilities through Fleet Support Ships Mine Warfare Forces: Detect, identify and neutralize threats from hostile use of maritime mines You may also be interested in becoming a Surface Warfare Officer within the prestigious Navy Nuclear community, where you will have the opportunity to work on some of the world's most powerful nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers. WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Surface Warfare Officer, you will work at sea and on shore, in a variety of environments. Sea duty could place you aboard ships within the fleet. Shore duty may involve a tour of duty at the Pentagon; a student assignment at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.; or command and management positions at shore bases and stations around the world. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Unless they have already been commissioned through the Naval Academy or ROTC, those pursuing a Surface Warfare Officer position are required to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, R.I. Newly commissioned SWOs can expect an advanced training process that includes comprehensive training at sea and ashore. Newly commissioned Surface Warfare Officers will be assigned to a surface ship, leading a team of Sailors responsible for a component of the ship - anything from electronics to weapons to engineering systems. In this setting, Officers are working toward full Surface Warfare qualification. After completing these initial sea tours, Surface Warfare Officers may be selected to serve on high-level staffs, commands or strategic projects, or they may be selected to work in recruitment. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. The ultimate goal for many: to one day command their own ship. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Surface Warfare Officers can advance their education by: * Pursuing opportunities at institutions such as Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) or Navy War College (NWC) * Completing Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) at one of the various service colleges QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree from an accredited U.S. college or university is required to become a Surface Warfare Officer. There are different ways to become a SWO. If you're a high school student or an undergraduate, you can enter through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) or through the U.S. Naval Academy. Those already having a degree attend Officer Candidate School (OCS), a 12-week Navy school in Newport, R.I. To be an eligible candidate, you must: * Be a U.S. citizen * Be at least 19 years of age and no older than 29 at the time of commissioning * Meet the Navy's physical standards General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Naval Aviator - Kennewick, Washington   

Cache   
ABOUT Search for underwater threats. Deliver payloads of incredible firepower or necessary manpower. Execute strategic aerial maneuvers anywhere from the stratosphere, to mere feet above the sea. This is just a glimpse into your career as a Naval Aviator. You also may find yourself: * Flying some of the most innovative and high-tech aircraft in the world * Providing vital attack, defense and logistic support to the Fleet * Controlling and maintaining all internal and external aircraft systems RESPONSIBILITIES Navy Pilots and Naval Flight Officers (NFOs) are important components in an exclusive, world-class group of Officers. This job will require you to perform at the best of your ability at all times. Making use of your advanced training and unparalleled knowledge to provide the utmost safety and security in the world's skies. As a Pilot, you may: * Take part in antisubmarine warfare and mine countermeasures, as well as search and rescue operations and vertical replenishment missions * Receive specialized training on the advanced tactical systems found on Navy aircraft * Project aviation power in fighter and attack, reconnaissance, and sea control missions. launching from aircraft carriers or surface combatants. * Conduct enemy surveillance by collecting photographic intelligence As an NFO, you may: * Study aerodynamics, aircraft engine systems, meteorology, navigation, flight planning and flight safety * Train and specialize in EA-18G Growler electronic countermeasures aircraft, E-2C Hawkeye early warning and control aircraft, or the new P-8A Poseidon antisubmarine aircraft * Electronically detect and track ships, submarines, aircraft and missiles WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Navy Pilot or an NFO, missions and assignments can be anywhere around the globe. This includes working from carrier battle groups, or other sea-based platforms, and at Naval Air Stations or other locations on shore. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Those entering aviation programs must first attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI, and then complete a six-week air indoctrination course at Naval Aviation Schools Command, in Pensacola, FL. From there, prospective Pilots and NFOs attend primary flight training. Pilots and NFOs then request an aircraft pipeline and enter the intermediate phase of flight training, which builds upon basic flight and navigation training. The final phase is advanced naval flight training, focusing on mission specifics. After completion, Pilots and NFOs are awarded their "wings of gold" and report to their respective Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRSs) for further training specific to their aircraft. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Following your initial flying tour as a Navy Pilot or an NFO, you can attend the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA, where you may be able to earn a master's or doctoral degree while being paid full-time. QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is required to work as a Navy Pilot or Naval Flight Officer. Candidates seeking an Officer position in this community must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in a technical field. All candidates must also be U.S. citizens, willing to serve worldwide and qualified for sea duty. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Professions: Cryptologic Technician - Newark, New Jersey   

Cache   
ABOUT Enlisted Sailors in the Navy Cryptology community analyze encrypted electronic communications, jam enemy radar signals, decipher information in foreign languages and maintain state-of-the-art equipment and networks used to generate top secret intel. Their other responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and reporting on communication signals * Utilizing computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment and video display terminals * Serving as an important part of the Information Dominance Corps in its mission to gain a deep understanding of the inner workings of adversaries and develop unmatched knowledge of the battlespace during wartime RESPONSIBILITIES Within Navy Cryptology, there are distinct focus areas that have their own training paths and job descriptions. Each CT role works under the oversight of Cryptologic Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required) - and potentially both. Cryptologic Technician Interpretive (CTI) - CTIs serve as experts in linguistics (including Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Persian-Farsi, Russian and Spanish) and deciphering information in other languages. Their responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and exploiting foreign language communications of interest * Transcribing, translating and interpreting foreign language materials * Providing cultural and regional guidance in support of Navy, Joint Force, national and multinational needs Cryptologic Technician Technical (CTT) - CTTs serve as experts in airborne, shipborne and land-based radar signals. Their responsibilities include: * Operating electronic intelligence-receiving and direction-finding systems, digital recording devices, analysis terminals, and associated computer equipment * Operating systems that produce high-power jamming signals used to deceive electronic sensors and defeat radar-guided weapons systems * Providing technical and tactical guidance in support of surface, subsurface, air and special warfare operations Cryptologic Technician Networks (CTN) - CTNs serve as experts in communication network defense and forensics. Their responsibilities include: * Monitoring, identifying, collecting and analyzing information * Providing computer network risk mitigation and network vulnerability assessments and incident response/reconstruction * Providing network target access tool development * Conducting computer network operations worldwide in support of Navy and Department of Defense missions Cryptologic Technician Maintenance (CTM) - CTMs serve as experts in the preventive and corrective maintenance of sophisticated cryptologic equipment, networks and systems. Their responsibilities include: * Installing, testing, troubleshooting, repairing or replacing cryptologic networks, physical security systems, electronic equipment, antennas, personal computers, auxiliary equipment, digital and optical interfaces, and data systems * Configuring, monitoring and evaluating Information Operations (IO), Information Warfare (IW) systems and Information Assurance (IA) operations Cryptologic Technician Collection (CTR) - CTRs serve as experts in intercepting signals. Their responsibilities include: * Analyzing and reporting on communication signals using computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment, video display terminals and electronic/magnetic tape recorders * Exploiting signals of interest to identify, locate and report worldwide threats * Providing tactical and strategic signals intelligence, technical guidance, and information warfare support to surface, subsurface, air and special warfare units. WORK ENVIRONMENT Cryptologic Technicians perform a variety of duties worldwide, at numerous overseas and stateside shore commands; aboard surface ships, aircraft and submarines; and with Naval Special Warfare - generally dividing time between assignments ashore and afloat. Duties could be performed in an office setting, lab-type setting, specialized maintenance shop, secure space or watch environment. As a CT, you may work independently or as part of small, coordinated teams - ultimately under the supervision of Information Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required). TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Upon completion of initial 7-9 week Recruit Training (known as Boot Camp), those pursuing a Cryptologic Technician role report to either Pensacola, Fla., or Monterey, Calif., to receive formal Navy schooling in their specialty area within the field of cryptology. This consists of technical "A" School and possibly advanced "C" School or "F" School. CTI training - Class "A" School is broken into two phases. Phase One takes place at the Defense Language Institute, Monterey, Calif., and is anywhere from 27 to 64 weeks long. Phase Two is 12 weeks long. Class "F" School is conducted at the Regional Center for Excellence in Monterey, Calif. CTT training - Class "A" School is approximately 17 weeks long. After "A" school, some CTTs will attend a Class "C" School that is approximately 26 weeks in duration. The schools are located in Pensacola, Fla. CTN training - Class "A" School is 26 weeks long and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTM training - Class "A" School is approximately 10 weeks in duration and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTR training - Class "A" School is approximately 22 weeks long. The school is located in Pensacola, Fla. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. To learn more about the specific training path for any of the focus areas within the field of cryptology, locate a recruiter. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond offering access to professional credentials and certifications, Navy technical and operational training in the field of intelligence can translate to credit hours toward a bachelor's or associate degree through the American Council on Education. You may also continue your education through opportunities like the following: * Navy College Program and Tuition Assistance * Post-9/11 GI Bill QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is not required to become a member of the Navy electronics community. There are some specific requirements that apply to electronics jobs in advanced programs such as SECF and NF. Contact a recruiter for details. A high school diploma or equivalent is required to become an Enlisted Sailor in the cryptology field in the Navy. Those seeking a Cryptologic Technician position must be U.S. citizens who can meet eligibility requirements for a Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information security clearance. They should have an interest in advanced electronics and technology; exceptionally good character; good speaking, writing and record-keeping skills; a good working aptitude of math; and the capability to do highly detail-oriented, highly classified work. Specific qualifications vary depending upon specialization area within the field of cryptology. Contact a recruiter for details. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Surface Warfare Officer - Newark, New Jersey   

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ABOUT America's Navy has the most modern, advanced fleet of ships in the entire world. Surface Warfare Officers (SWOs) are trained extensively to maintain and operate these ships, their crews and their systems. Providing direction. Leading by example. Surface Warfare Officers form the backbone of Fleet leadership. In this role, you will have the opportunity to excel as a leader. You could serve as Commanding Officer over an elite crew and be an authority in every aspect of your Navy assignments. Doing any or all of the following: * Directing personnel operations aboard Navy vessels, such as aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, amphibious warfare ships, mine warfare ships and frigates * Managing shipboard vertical launch systems * Using computer displays and advanced technology in battle and ship defense * Providing support to Navy expeditionary forces, Theater Air Missile operations, anti-submarine warfare, surface-to-air warfare, and support and supply missions RESPONSIBILITIES Surface Warfare Officers are involved in virtually every aspect of Navy missions. As a SWO, you may be in charge of any number of shipboard operations and activities while at sea, working with or within any of these specialized forces: Aircraft Carrier Forces: Provide and coordinate air, submarine and surface ship defense for aircraft carriers Cruiser-Destroyer Forces: Provide ship attack and defensive measures with a wide array of missile and fire power capabilities, providing anti-air, -submarine and -surface warfare support Amphibious Forces: Embark and transport vehicles, equipment and personnel for amphibious assault operations Combat-Logistics Forces: Provide combatant ships with fuel, ammunition, food and supplies, and provide repair, maintenance and rescue capabilities through Fleet Support Ships Mine Warfare Forces: Detect, identify and neutralize threats from hostile use of maritime mines You may also be interested in becoming a Surface Warfare Officer within the prestigious Navy Nuclear community, where you will have the opportunity to work on some of the world's most powerful nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers. WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Surface Warfare Officer, you will work at sea and on shore, in a variety of environments. Sea duty could place you aboard ships within the fleet. Shore duty may involve a tour of duty at the Pentagon; a student assignment at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.; or command and management positions at shore bases and stations around the world. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Unless they have already been commissioned through the Naval Academy or ROTC, those pursuing a Surface Warfare Officer position are required to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, R.I. Newly commissioned SWOs can expect an advanced training process that includes comprehensive training at sea and ashore. Newly commissioned Surface Warfare Officers will be assigned to a surface ship, leading a team of Sailors responsible for a component of the ship - anything from electronics to weapons to engineering systems. In this setting, Officers are working toward full Surface Warfare qualification. After completing these initial sea tours, Surface Warfare Officers may be selected to serve on high-level staffs, commands or strategic projects, or they may be selected to work in recruitment. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. The ultimate goal for many: to one day command their own ship. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Surface Warfare Officers can advance their education by: * Pursuing opportunities at institutions such as Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) or Navy War College (NWC) * Completing Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) at one of the various service colleges QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree from an accredited U.S. college or university is required to become a Surface Warfare Officer. There are different ways to become a SWO. If you're a high school student or an undergraduate, you can enter through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) or through the U.S. Naval Academy. Those already having a degree attend Officer Candidate School (OCS), a 12-week Navy school in Newport, R.I. To be an eligible candidate, you must: * Be a U.S. citizen * Be at least 19 years of age and no older than 29 at the time of commissioning * Meet the Navy's physical standards General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Surface Warfare Officer - Pompano Beach, Florida   

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ABOUT America's Navy has the most modern, advanced fleet of ships in the entire world. Surface Warfare Officers (SWOs) are trained extensively to maintain and operate these ships, their crews and their systems. Providing direction. Leading by example. Surface Warfare Officers form the backbone of Fleet leadership. In this role, you will have the opportunity to excel as a leader. You could serve as Commanding Officer over an elite crew and be an authority in every aspect of your Navy assignments. Doing any or all of the following: * Directing personnel operations aboard Navy vessels, such as aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, amphibious warfare ships, mine warfare ships and frigates * Managing shipboard vertical launch systems * Using computer displays and advanced technology in battle and ship defense * Providing support to Navy expeditionary forces, Theater Air Missile operations, anti-submarine warfare, surface-to-air warfare, and support and supply missions RESPONSIBILITIES Surface Warfare Officers are involved in virtually every aspect of Navy missions. As a SWO, you may be in charge of any number of shipboard operations and activities while at sea, working with or within any of these specialized forces: Aircraft Carrier Forces: Provide and coordinate air, submarine and surface ship defense for aircraft carriers Cruiser-Destroyer Forces: Provide ship attack and defensive measures with a wide array of missile and fire power capabilities, providing anti-air, -submarine and -surface warfare support Amphibious Forces: Embark and transport vehicles, equipment and personnel for amphibious assault operations Combat-Logistics Forces: Provide combatant ships with fuel, ammunition, food and supplies, and provide repair, maintenance and rescue capabilities through Fleet Support Ships Mine Warfare Forces: Detect, identify and neutralize threats from hostile use of maritime mines You may also be interested in becoming a Surface Warfare Officer within the prestigious Navy Nuclear community, where you will have the opportunity to work on some of the world's most powerful nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers. WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Surface Warfare Officer, you will work at sea and on shore, in a variety of environments. Sea duty could place you aboard ships within the fleet. Shore duty may involve a tour of duty at the Pentagon; a student assignment at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.; or command and management positions at shore bases and stations around the world. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Unless they have already been commissioned through the Naval Academy or ROTC, those pursuing a Surface Warfare Officer position are required to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, R.I. Newly commissioned SWOs can expect an advanced training process that includes comprehensive training at sea and ashore. Newly commissioned Surface Warfare Officers will be assigned to a surface ship, leading a team of Sailors responsible for a component of the ship - anything from electronics to weapons to engineering systems. In this setting, Officers are working toward full Surface Warfare qualification. After completing these initial sea tours, Surface Warfare Officers may be selected to serve on high-level staffs, commands or strategic projects, or they may be selected to work in recruitment. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. The ultimate goal for many: to one day command their own ship. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Surface Warfare Officers can advance their education by: * Pursuing opportunities at institutions such as Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) or Navy War College (NWC) * Completing Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) at one of the various service colleges QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree from an accredited U.S. college or university is required to become a Surface Warfare Officer. There are different ways to become a SWO. If you're a high school student or an undergraduate, you can enter through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) or through the U.S. Naval Academy. Those already having a degree attend Officer Candidate School (OCS), a 12-week Navy school in Newport, R.I. To be an eligible candidate, you must: * Be a U.S. citizen * Be at least 19 years of age and no older than 29 at the time of commissioning * Meet the Navy's physical standards General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Professions: Cryptologic Technician - Hialeah, Florida   

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ABOUT Enlisted Sailors in the Navy Cryptology community analyze encrypted electronic communications, jam enemy radar signals, decipher information in foreign languages and maintain state-of-the-art equipment and networks used to generate top secret intel. Their other responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and reporting on communication signals * Utilizing computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment and video display terminals * Serving as an important part of the Information Dominance Corps in its mission to gain a deep understanding of the inner workings of adversaries and develop unmatched knowledge of the battlespace during wartime RESPONSIBILITIES Within Navy Cryptology, there are distinct focus areas that have their own training paths and job descriptions. Each CT role works under the oversight of Cryptologic Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required) - and potentially both. Cryptologic Technician Interpretive (CTI) - CTIs serve as experts in linguistics (including Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Persian-Farsi, Russian and Spanish) and deciphering information in other languages. Their responsibilities include: * Collecting, analyzing and exploiting foreign language communications of interest * Transcribing, translating and interpreting foreign language materials * Providing cultural and regional guidance in support of Navy, Joint Force, national and multinational needs Cryptologic Technician Technical (CTT) - CTTs serve as experts in airborne, shipborne and land-based radar signals. Their responsibilities include: * Operating electronic intelligence-receiving and direction-finding systems, digital recording devices, analysis terminals, and associated computer equipment * Operating systems that produce high-power jamming signals used to deceive electronic sensors and defeat radar-guided weapons systems * Providing technical and tactical guidance in support of surface, subsurface, air and special warfare operations Cryptologic Technician Networks (CTN) - CTNs serve as experts in communication network defense and forensics. Their responsibilities include: * Monitoring, identifying, collecting and analyzing information * Providing computer network risk mitigation and network vulnerability assessments and incident response/reconstruction * Providing network target access tool development * Conducting computer network operations worldwide in support of Navy and Department of Defense missions Cryptologic Technician Maintenance (CTM) - CTMs serve as experts in the preventive and corrective maintenance of sophisticated cryptologic equipment, networks and systems. Their responsibilities include: * Installing, testing, troubleshooting, repairing or replacing cryptologic networks, physical security systems, electronic equipment, antennas, personal computers, auxiliary equipment, digital and optical interfaces, and data systems * Configuring, monitoring and evaluating Information Operations (IO), Information Warfare (IW) systems and Information Assurance (IA) operations Cryptologic Technician Collection (CTR) - CTRs serve as experts in intercepting signals. Their responsibilities include: * Analyzing and reporting on communication signals using computers, specialized computer-assisted communications equipment, video display terminals and electronic/magnetic tape recorders * Exploiting signals of interest to identify, locate and report worldwide threats * Providing tactical and strategic signals intelligence, technical guidance, and information warfare support to surface, subsurface, air and special warfare units. WORK ENVIRONMENT Cryptologic Technicians perform a variety of duties worldwide, at numerous overseas and stateside shore commands; aboard surface ships, aircraft and submarines; and with Naval Special Warfare - generally dividing time between assignments ashore and afloat. Duties could be performed in an office setting, lab-type setting, specialized maintenance shop, secure space or watch environment. As a CT, you may work independently or as part of small, coordinated teams - ultimately under the supervision of Information Warfare Officers (four-year degree required) or Cyber Warfare Engineers (four-year degree required). TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Upon completion of initial 7-9 week Recruit Training (known as Boot Camp), those pursuing a Cryptologic Technician role report to either Pensacola, Fla., or Monterey, Calif., to receive formal Navy schooling in their specialty area within the field of cryptology. This consists of technical "A" School and possibly advanced "C" School or "F" School. CTI training - Class "A" School is broken into two phases. Phase One takes place at the Defense Language Institute, Monterey, Calif., and is anywhere from 27 to 64 weeks long. Phase Two is 12 weeks long. Class "F" School is conducted at the Regional Center for Excellence in Monterey, Calif. CTT training - Class "A" School is approximately 17 weeks long. After "A" school, some CTTs will attend a Class "C" School that is approximately 26 weeks in duration. The schools are located in Pensacola, Fla. CTN training - Class "A" School is 26 weeks long and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTM training - Class "A" School is approximately 10 weeks in duration and located in Pensacola, Fla. CTR training - Class "A" School is approximately 22 weeks long. The school is located in Pensacola, Fla. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. To learn more about the specific training path for any of the focus areas within the field of cryptology, locate a recruiter. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond offering access to professional credentials and certifications, Navy technical and operational training in the field of intelligence can translate to credit hours toward a bachelor's or associate degree through the American Council on Education. You may also continue your education through opportunities like the following: * Navy College Program and Tuition Assistance * Post-9/11 GI Bill QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is not required to become a member of the Navy electronics community. There are some specific requirements that apply to electronics jobs in advanced programs such as SECF and NF. Contact a recruiter for details. A high school diploma or equivalent is required to become an Enlisted Sailor in the cryptology field in the Navy. Those seeking a Cryptologic Technician position must be U.S. citizens who can meet eligibility requirements for a Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information security clearance. They should have an interest in advanced electronics and technology; exceptionally good character; good speaking, writing and record-keeping skills; a good working aptitude of math; and the capability to do highly detail-oriented, highly classified work. Specific qualifications vary depending upon specialization area within the field of cryptology. Contact a recruiter for details. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Surface Warfare Officer - Hollywood, Florida   

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ABOUT America's Navy has the most modern, advanced fleet of ships in the entire world. Surface Warfare Officers (SWOs) are trained extensively to maintain and operate these ships, their crews and their systems. Providing direction. Leading by example. Surface Warfare Officers form the backbone of Fleet leadership. In this role, you will have the opportunity to excel as a leader. You could serve as Commanding Officer over an elite crew and be an authority in every aspect of your Navy assignments. Doing any or all of the following: * Directing personnel operations aboard Navy vessels, such as aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, amphibious warfare ships, mine warfare ships and frigates * Managing shipboard vertical launch systems * Using computer displays and advanced technology in battle and ship defense * Providing support to Navy expeditionary forces, Theater Air Missile operations, anti-submarine warfare, surface-to-air warfare, and support and supply missions RESPONSIBILITIES Surface Warfare Officers are involved in virtually every aspect of Navy missions. As a SWO, you may be in charge of any number of shipboard operations and activities while at sea, working with or within any of these specialized forces: Aircraft Carrier Forces: Provide and coordinate air, submarine and surface ship defense for aircraft carriers Cruiser-Destroyer Forces: Provide ship attack and defensive measures with a wide array of missile and fire power capabilities, providing anti-air, -submarine and -surface warfare support Amphibious Forces: Embark and transport vehicles, equipment and personnel for amphibious assault operations Combat-Logistics Forces: Provide combatant ships with fuel, ammunition, food and supplies, and provide repair, maintenance and rescue capabilities through Fleet Support Ships Mine Warfare Forces: Detect, identify and neutralize threats from hostile use of maritime mines You may also be interested in becoming a Surface Warfare Officer within the prestigious Navy Nuclear community, where you will have the opportunity to work on some of the world's most powerful nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers. WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Surface Warfare Officer, you will work at sea and on shore, in a variety of environments. Sea duty could place you aboard ships within the fleet. Shore duty may involve a tour of duty at the Pentagon; a student assignment at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.; or command and management positions at shore bases and stations around the world. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Unless they have already been commissioned through the Naval Academy or ROTC, those pursuing a Surface Warfare Officer position are required to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, R.I. Newly commissioned SWOs can expect an advanced training process that includes comprehensive training at sea and ashore. Newly commissioned Surface Warfare Officers will be assigned to a surface ship, leading a team of Sailors responsible for a component of the ship - anything from electronics to weapons to engineering systems. In this setting, Officers are working toward full Surface Warfare qualification. After completing these initial sea tours, Surface Warfare Officers may be selected to serve on high-level staffs, commands or strategic projects, or they may be selected to work in recruitment. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. The ultimate goal for many: to one day command their own ship. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Surface Warfare Officers can advance their education by: * Pursuing opportunities at institutions such as Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) or Navy War College (NWC) * Completing Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) at one of the various service colleges QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree from an accredited U.S. college or university is required to become a Surface Warfare Officer. There are different ways to become a SWO. If you're a high school student or an undergraduate, you can enter through the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) or through the U.S. Naval Academy. Those already having a degree attend Officer Candidate School (OCS), a 12-week Navy school in Newport, R.I. To be an eligible candidate, you must: * Be a U.S. citizen * Be at least 19 years of age and no older than 29 at the time of commissioning * Meet the Navy's physical standards General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Naval Aviator - Miami, Florida   

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ABOUT Search for underwater threats. Deliver payloads of incredible firepower or necessary manpower. Execute strategic aerial maneuvers anywhere from the stratosphere, to mere feet above the sea. This is just a glimpse into your career as a Naval Aviator. You also may find yourself: * Flying some of the most innovative and high-tech aircraft in the world * Providing vital attack, defense and logistic support to the Fleet * Controlling and maintaining all internal and external aircraft systems RESPONSIBILITIES Navy Pilots and Naval Flight Officers (NFOs) are important components in an exclusive, world-class group of Officers. This job will require you to perform at the best of your ability at all times. Making use of your advanced training and unparalleled knowledge to provide the utmost safety and security in the world's skies. As a Pilot, you may: * Take part in antisubmarine warfare and mine countermeasures, as well as search and rescue operations and vertical replenishment missions * Receive specialized training on the advanced tactical systems found on Navy aircraft * Project aviation power in fighter and attack, reconnaissance, and sea control missions. launching from aircraft carriers or surface combatants. * Conduct enemy surveillance by collecting photographic intelligence As an NFO, you may: * Study aerodynamics, aircraft engine systems, meteorology, navigation, flight planning and flight safety * Train and specialize in EA-18G Growler electronic countermeasures aircraft, E-2C Hawkeye early warning and control aircraft, or the new P-8A Poseidon antisubmarine aircraft * Electronically detect and track ships, submarines, aircraft and missiles WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Navy Pilot or an NFO, missions and assignments can be anywhere around the globe. This includes working from carrier battle groups, or other sea-based platforms, and at Naval Air Stations or other locations on shore. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Those entering aviation programs must first attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI, and then complete a six-week air indoctrination course at Naval Aviation Schools Command, in Pensacola, FL. From there, prospective Pilots and NFOs attend primary flight training. Pilots and NFOs then request an aircraft pipeline and enter the intermediate phase of flight training, which builds upon basic flight and navigation training. The final phase is advanced naval flight training, focusing on mission specifics. After completion, Pilots and NFOs are awarded their "wings of gold" and report to their respective Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRSs) for further training specific to their aircraft. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Following your initial flying tour as a Navy Pilot or an NFO, you can attend the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA, where you may be able to earn a master's or doctoral degree while being paid full-time. QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is required to work as a Navy Pilot or Naval Flight Officer. Candidates seeking an Officer position in this community must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in a technical field. All candidates must also be U.S. citizens, willing to serve worldwide and qualified for sea duty. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Other: Naval Aviator - Fort Lauderdale, Florida   

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ABOUT Search for underwater threats. Deliver payloads of incredible firepower or necessary manpower. Execute strategic aerial maneuvers anywhere from the stratosphere, to mere feet above the sea. This is just a glimpse into your career as a Naval Aviator. You also may find yourself: * Flying some of the most innovative and high-tech aircraft in the world * Providing vital attack, defense and logistic support to the Fleet * Controlling and maintaining all internal and external aircraft systems RESPONSIBILITIES Navy Pilots and Naval Flight Officers (NFOs) are important components in an exclusive, world-class group of Officers. This job will require you to perform at the best of your ability at all times. Making use of your advanced training and unparalleled knowledge to provide the utmost safety and security in the world's skies. As a Pilot, you may: * Take part in antisubmarine warfare and mine countermeasures, as well as search and rescue operations and vertical replenishment missions * Receive specialized training on the advanced tactical systems found on Navy aircraft * Project aviation power in fighter and attack, reconnaissance, and sea control missions. launching from aircraft carriers or surface combatants. * Conduct enemy surveillance by collecting photographic intelligence As an NFO, you may: * Study aerodynamics, aircraft engine systems, meteorology, navigation, flight planning and flight safety * Train and specialize in EA-18G Growler electronic countermeasures aircraft, E-2C Hawkeye early warning and control aircraft, or the new P-8A Poseidon antisubmarine aircraft * Electronically detect and track ships, submarines, aircraft and missiles WORK ENVIRONMENT As a Navy Pilot or an NFO, missions and assignments can be anywhere around the globe. This includes working from carrier battle groups, or other sea-based platforms, and at Naval Air Stations or other locations on shore. TRAINING & ADVANCEMENT Those entering aviation programs must first attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI, and then complete a six-week air indoctrination course at Naval Aviation Schools Command, in Pensacola, FL. From there, prospective Pilots and NFOs attend primary flight training. Pilots and NFOs then request an aircraft pipeline and enter the intermediate phase of flight training, which builds upon basic flight and navigation training. The final phase is advanced naval flight training, focusing on mission specifics. After completion, Pilots and NFOs are awarded their "wings of gold" and report to their respective Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRSs) for further training specific to their aircraft. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It's also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields. EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES Following your initial flying tour as a Navy Pilot or an NFO, you can attend the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, CA, where you may be able to earn a master's or doctoral degree while being paid full-time. QUALIFICATIONS & REQUIREMENTS A four-year degree is required to work as a Navy Pilot or Naval Flight Officer. Candidates seeking an Officer position in this community must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution in a technical field. All candidates must also be U.S. citizens, willing to serve worldwide and qualified for sea duty. General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you're currently serving, whether you've served before or whether you've never served before. ()
          

Senior Information Architect   

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CA-Monterey Park, Terrific PERMANENT Opportunity with a FULL suite of benefits! Position: Senior Information Architect Location: Monterey Park, California Salary: $130K - $160K Job Summary: This position is responsible for coordinating all related information architecture activity and for working across lines of business, enterprise architecture and the office of CDO. The position will involve peer level leadership
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