Next Page: 25
          

'People's Cup' Now Touring    

Cache   
The 2013 Emirates Melbourne has commenced its three month tour of Australia, starting in Rockhampton, Queensland and heading to all Australian states (including Tasmania) and Auckland, New Zealand. Visit full schedule HERE. Along the way it will be displayed at schools, charity dinners, civic receptions, cocktail parties and street parades. The tour finishes in the cup's home state of Victoria, at Flemington Racecourse for the running of the 153 Emirates Melbourne Cup.
          

2018 AUSTRALASIAN POSTGRADUATE PHILOSOPHY CONFERENCE   

Cache   

CALL FOR TENDERS TO HOST THE 2018 AUSTRALASIAN POSTGRADUATE PHILOSOPHY CONFERENCE

The Postgraduate Committee to the AAP is welcoming proposals from postgraduates from any institution in Australia, New Zealand, or Singapore with a postgraduate philosophy programme to organise and host the 2018 Australasian Postgraduate Philosophy Conference (APPC).

ABOUT THE APPC

The APPC is an annual conference that provides an opportunity for postgraduate students from Australasia to present their work, debate their ideas, receive feedback from peers and form collaborations across institutions. The conference is usually three days and includes a variety of sessions including standard talks, pre-read paper discussions, career and publishing workshops, and more. The conference environment is laid back and can be a great introduction to conferences for new graduate students.  Recent conferences have been held in Brisbane, Canberra, Adelaide, Sydney and Auckland.

WHY HOST AN APPC?

Hosting the conference provides the opportunity to gain valuable experience in conference organisation and committee management, both of which are important skills for successful academic philosophers. Hosting the APPC is also a great way of promoting your university's philosophy program (including to prospective graduate students). Last, but not least, organising a conference can be a lot of fun and is a great way to give service back to the profession while making contacts and friends, both within your institution and within the broader Australasian philosophy community.  

ABOUT BIDS

A successful bid will justify a selection for the conference dates and contain a budget with an indication of expected funding sources, a conference planning timeline, and brief details of why your university would make a good site for the conference. Bidders are encouraged to be both realistic and creative with their bids. Our comprehensive APPC Hosting Guide can sent on request, and we are happy to assist organisers with any further questions that they might have. Bids for the 2018 APPC close January 31st 2018. Bidders are not restricted to groups from a single university and may be interdisciplinary. It may be helpful in terms of funding and organising resources to join forces with another institution in your local area or discipline/department at your university.

CONTACTS

If you are interested in hosting the 2018 APPC, or would like any further information about hosting an APPC or a copy of the hosting guide, please contact Toby Solomon (toby.solomon@anu.edu.au).



          

Call for Tenders APPC 2017   

Cache   

CALL FOR TENDERS TO HOST THE 2017 AUSTRALASIAN POSTGRADUATE PHILOSOPHY CONFERENCE

The Postgraduate Committee to the AAP is welcoming proposals from postgraduates from any institution in Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore with postgraduate philosophy programmes to organise and host the 2017 Australasian Postgraduate Philosophy Conference (APPC).

ABOUT THE APPC

The APPC is usually a three-day conference and provides the opportunity for postgraduate students from Australasia to present their work, debate their ideas, receive feedback from peers and form collaborations across institutions. Hosting the conference provides the opportunity to gain valuable experience in conference organisation and committee management as well as promoting your university's philosophy program. For over two decades, APPCs have included discussions with other graduates, meetings with successful philosophers, career seminars and/or publishing workshops (e.g. with the editor of the Australasian Journal of Philosophy). Recent conferences have been held in Canberra, Adelaide, Sydney and Auckland.

ABOUT BIDS

A successful bid will justify their selection of the conference dates and will likely contain a budget with an indication of expected funding sources, a conference planning timeline, and brief details of local facilities (including accommodation options). Bidders are encouraged to be both realistic and creative with their bids. Our comprehensive APPC Hosting Guide can be sent upon request, and we are happy to assist organisers with any further questions that they might have. Bids for the 2017 APPC close December 31st. Bidders are not restricted to groups from a single university and it may be helpful in terms of funding sources and organising resources to link up with others from local institutions.

CONTACTS

If you are interested in hosting the 2017 APPC, or would like any further information about hosting an APPC, including the APPC Hosting Guide, please contact Toby Solomon (toby.solomon@anu.edu.au<mailto:toby.solomon@anu.edu.au>).


Toby Solomon


          

Call of Bids for 2016 APPC   

Cache   

The Postgraduate Committee to the AAP is welcoming proposals from postgraduates from any institution in Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore with postgraduate philosophy programmes to organise and host the 2016 Australasian Philosophy Postgraduate Conference (APPC).

ABOUT THE APPC

The APPC is usually a three-day conference and provides the opportunity for postgraduate students from Australasia to present their work, debate their ideas, receive feedback from peers and form collaborations across institutions. For over two decades, APPCs have included discussions with other graduates, meetings with successful philosophers, career seminars and/or publishing workshops (e.g. with the editor of the Australasian Journal of Philosophy). Recent conferences have been held in Adelaide, Sydney and Auckland.

ABOUT BIDS

A successful bid will justify their selection of the conference dates and will likely contain a budget with an indication of expected fund sources, a conference planning timeline, and brief details of local facilities (including accommodation options). Bidders are encouraged to be both realistic and creative with their bids. Our comprehensive APPC Hosting Guide can be sent upon request, and we are happy to assist organisers with any further questions that they might have. Bids for the 2016 APPC close March 31st.

CONTACTS

If you are interested in hosting the 2016 APPC, or would like any further information about hosting an APPC, including the APPC Hosting Guide, please contact Jarrah Aubourg (jarrah@uow.edu.au).



          

CALL FOR BIDS - 2015 Australasian Philosophy Postgraduate Conference   

Cache   

The AAP Postgraduate Steering Committee (PGSC) is now welcoming proposals
from postgraduates from any institution in Australia, New Zealand, and
Singapore with postgraduate philosophy programmes to organize and host the
next Australasian Philosophy Postgraduate Conference (APPC).

*ABOUT THE APPC*
The APPC provides the opportunity for postgraduate students from
Australasia to present their work, debate their ideas, receive feedback
from peers and form collaborations across institutions. For over two
decades, APPCs have included discussions with other graduates, meetings
with successful philosophers, career seminars and/or publishing workshops
(e.g. with the editor of the Australasian Journal of Philosophy). Recent
conferences have been held in Auckland, Melbourne and Sydney.

*ABOUT BIDS*
A successful bid will likely contain a budget with an indication of
expected fund sources, a conference planning timeline and brief details of
local facilities (including accommodation options). Bidders are encouraged
to be realistic and creative with their bids. Our comprehensive APPC
Hosting Guide can be sent upon request, and we are
happy to assist organisers with any further questions that they might have.

*CONTACTS*
If you are interested in submitting a Bid, or would like any further
information about hosting an APPC, please contact Tessa Jones
(tessa.jones@monash.edu).

Kind regards,

Tessa Jones
Proposal Support Officer - Monash Research Office
PhD Candidate - School of Philosophical, Historical and International
Studies
Monash University


          

Professor Max Charlesworth   

Cache   

Max Charlesworth (1925-2014), AO, FAHA, was one of the great figures in Australasian philosophy. Areas in which he worked included: philosophy of religion, bioethics, European philosophy, social studies in science, studies of indigenous Australian religions, and political philosophy (with a particular focus on relations between church and state, and the activities and organisation of the Catholic Church).

Max obtained a BA (Hons) (1946) and an MA (1949) from the University of Melbourne, and a PhD (1955) from the University of Louvain. He was Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Auckland (1956-1958); Lecturer (1959-1961), Senior Lecturer (1962-67) and Reader (1968-1974) in Philosophy at the University of Melbourne; and Planning Dean of Humanities (1975-1980) and Professor of Philosophy (1980-1990) at Deakin University. From 1990, he was Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at Deakin. He held various visiting appointments in the course of his career, including at the University of Notre Dame (1968-9) and the University of Louvain (1972).

Max was the founder of Sophia, and its co-editor from 1962-1990; he was also founder and co-editor of The Catholic Worker. His major books include: Philosophy and Linguistic Analysis (1959); St. Anselm’s Proslogion (1965); Life among the Scientists (1989); Life, Death, Genes and Ethics (1989); Bioethics in a Liberal Society (1993); Religious Business (1998); and Philosophy and Religion (2002).

Positions of responsibility that Max held included: membership of the Charles Strong Trust (1975-2014); Chairperson of the Advisory Committee of the Centre for Human Bioethics (1987-1990); member of the Victorian Government Standing Review and Advisory Committee on Infertility (1985-2014), and member of the National Bioethics Consultation Committee (1988-1990)

A fuller account of Max’s life from which all of the above has been cribbed may be found at: https://God.blue/forward.php?url=http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/468/art%253A10.1007%252Fs11841-012-0345-x.pdf?auth66=1402102405_b1202bd7fa702bea8c1f0b412c095e7a&ext=.pdf


**The AAP hopes that this page can be used to collate and share thoughts about Professor Max Charlesworth. If you leave a post, make sure you add your name at the end, and your email, if you wish.


          

CFP: 2013 AAP New Zealand Conference (Auckland, 08-12 December 2013)   

Cache   
Call for papers:

2013 AAP New Zealand Conference
8-12 December, The University of Auckland
https://God.blue/forward.php?url=http://2013aapnzconference.blogspot.co.nz/p/home.html

The Conference is designed to give academics and postgraduate students in
Philosophy and related subjects the opportunity to present and discuss
their papers. All areas of philosophy are welcome. Choose between 60-minute
and 90-minute long sessions.

The opening address will be given by Prof Stephen Davies (Auckland) on the
evening of  Sunday, 8 December. On the evening of Tuesday, 10 December, Dr
Karen Jones (Melbourne) will give this year's Robert C. Solomon Lecture, to
which Conference guests are warmly invited.

Registration for the 2013 AAP New Zealand Conference is now open. You may
attend as a presenter or without presenting a paper.

The first deadline for submitting abstracts (with titles) is 08 November
2013. Please note that you may only submit one paper. If we still have open
presentation slots after the specified deadline, we will be happy to accept
further submissions. Priority at that point will be given to first papers;
after that, we will be open to accepting second papers from authors at our
discretion.

We have a limited amount of funding with which to assist postgraduate
students from New Zealand who present at the Conference. Please visit our
website for more details (select 'Student Travel Support' in the menu).

Please also note that on the Friday immediately after the Conference (13
December) we are hosting a workshop on The Philosophy of Cyber Security:
Confronting Practice with Reflection. (Details can be found online.)

Please visit our Conference website for all your information needs first:
https://God.blue/forward.php?url=http://2013aapnzconference.blogspot.co.nz/p/home.html

For further questions, feel free to contact the organisers at the following
addresses:

Denis Robinson: dj.robinson@auckland.ac.nz
Marco Grix: m.grix@auckland.ac.nz

Department of Philosophy
University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland 1142
New Zealand
          

CALL FOR BIDS to host The Australasian Philosophy Postgraduate Conference - Extended Deadline   

Cache   
The AAP Postgraduate Steering Committee (PGSC) is now welcoming proposals
from postgraduates from any institution in Australia, New Zealand, and
Singapore with postgraduate philosophy programmes to organize and host the
next Australasian Philosophy Postgraduate Conference (APPC). The Call for
Bids deadline has been extended, and now closes December 1, 2013.

*ABOUT THE APPC*
The APPC provides the opportunity for postgraduate students from
Australasia to present their work, debate their ideas, receive feedback
from peers and form collaborations across institutions. For over two
decades, APPCs have included discussions with other graduates, meetings
with successful philosophers, career seminars and/or publishing workshops
(e.g. with the editor of the Australasian Journal of Philosophy). Recent
conferences have been held in Auckland and Melbourne.

*ABOUT BIDS*
A successful bid will likely contain a budget with an indication of
expected fund sources, a conference planning timeline, and brief details of
local facilities (including accommodation options). Bidders are encouraged
to be realistic and creative with their bids. Our comprehensive APPC
Hosting Guide can be sent upon request, and we are
happy to assist organisers with any further questions that they might have.

*CONTACTS*
If you are interested in submitting a Bid, or would like any further
information about hosting an APPC, please contact Tessa Jones (
tessa.jones@monash.edu) or Paul Daniels (paul.daniels@gmail.com).

Be well,
Paul Daniels
AAP Council, Student Rep
          

Advance notice: 2013 New Zealand Philosophy Conference   

Cache   
2013 New Zealand Philosophy Conference
(hitherto 'AAP NZ Division Conference')
8-12 December, The University of Auckland

This is an early notice that this year's New Zealand Philosophy Conference
will be held at The University of Auckland (New Zealand) from the evening
of Sunday 8th December to the afternoon of Thursday 12th December 2013.

Due to legal/structural changes of the AAP, a number of formal details of
the conference are yet to be finalised (including its title). Details of
the event will be posted on our departmental website in late July, once the
2013 AAP Conference hosted by The University of Queensland and Bond
University has ended. We will also send a call for papers at that time.

In the meantime, if you would like further details on arrangements, please
feel free to contact the organisers at the following addresses:

Denis Robinson: dj.robinson@auckland.ac.nz
Marco Grix: m.grix@auckland.ac.nz

Department of Philosophy
University of Auckland
Private Bag 92019
Auckland 1142
New Zealand

(https://God.blue/forward.php?url=http://www.arts.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/philosophy)
          

APPC 2013 Conference Bids   

Cache   
We are now welcoming all proposals by postgraduates to organize and host the 2012 Australasian Philosophy Postgraduate Conference (APPC)

The APPC provides the opportunity for postgraduate students studying all over Australasia to present their work, debate their ideas, and meet others around our region.

For over two decades, we have sought to provide postgraduate attendees with programming suited to their needs, including public forums, discussions with graduates, philosophy 'superstars', and a publishing workshop with the editor of the Australasian Journal of Philosophy. Recent conferences have been in Christchurch, Sydney, Auckland and Melbourne, and we definitely welcome bids from anywhere in New Zealand, Australia and Singapore that teaches postgraduate Philosophy.

Our comprehensive guide to hosting the APPC can be sent upon request, and we are happy to assist organisers with any further questions that they might have.

Bids close on January 15th, with the successful bidder notified by January 30th.

Successful bids will likely contain a budget, brief details of local facilities and local accommodation, and a conference planning timeline. Further details concerning bid evaluation criteria are available upon request. Bidders are encouraged to be both realistic and creative with their bids!

If you are interested in hosting the 2013 conference, or would like further information, then please contact Tad Davis at tdav105@aucklanduni.ac.nz

For any general comments about the PGSC please contact the new Postgraduate Committee Chair, Paul Daniels at paul.daniels@gmail.com

          

Mercy flights: Thousands of stranded Australians to fly home   

Cache   

Qantas and Virgin will restart scheduled flights to Los Angeles, Hong Kong, London and Auckland in a bid to assist Australians stuck overseas.
          

Nikki Johnson: Horticulture sector 'lifeline' for more Kiwi workers   

Cache   
The country's horticultural sector is offering a lifeline for workers from other industries impacted by the Covid-19 lockdown, including in the Bay of Plenty region.
Agriculture Minister Damien O'Connor said the horticulture sector had long been one of New Zealand's export "star performers" having contributed about $6 billion a year to the country's economy.
"Now they're also becoming a lifeline for a number of redeployed workers from industries such as tourism, forestry and hospitality," he said.O'Connor said overseas workers traditionally filled roles in horticulture but because of Covid-19 precautions many were not available
New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Inc reported some businesses now had a workforce of more than 90 per cent New Zealanders, compared to about 50 per cent last season.
Last week more than 100 staff were placed into roles in the Bay of Plenty, Auckland and Nelson regions.
The pip fruit industry had seen about 200 workers from other industries placed into jobs across the country, the Minister said.
O'Connor said it was great to see Kiwis taking up the opportunity to be part of this essential industry.
"Now is a peak time for picking apples and kiwifruit and workers are in high demand with over 20,000 needed at the peak of the harvest.
"There are jobs going all over the country in our key growing areas, and the Government is working alongside the primary sector to help ensure workers get to the places they are needed.
"We are currently investigating further ways we can boost the primary sector essential workforce through the Government's $100m redeployment scheme."
O'Connor said there was no shortage of demand for New Zealand produce.
"The world needs a continuous supply of fresh fruit and vegetables and our country is in the position to help do that," he said.
"Our primary sector is part of the solution to global food security concerns in the short-term and will play a critical role in New Zealand's economic recovery after COVID-19.
This is why we have ensured that our food supply chain (farmers, processing, distribution, supermarkets) can continue to operate during the lockdown to keep our exports flowing."
O'Connor said conversations with industry leaders made it clear that the primary sector appreciated they were in a privileged position of being deemed an essential service.
"They're very aware that other sectors are doing it tough and they want to do what they can to help. They know, just as the Government does, that the best thing to do right now is keeping people connected to jobs," he said.
"The Government is doing that through the wage subsidy scheme that has paid out about $6 billion to date, and the primary sector wants to give those who have lost jobs opportunities in its sector."
"I thank our farmers, growers, meat workers, fruit pickers and all the others who are helping our primary sector to keep operating as an essential service during the COVID-19 global pandemic," O'Connor said.
          

cheap viagra gold   

Cache   
buy cheap cialis today https://God.blue/forward.php?url=http://hydroxychloroquine24.com - buy plaquenil liquid viagra buy uk how to order levitra online https://God.blue/forward.php?url=http://alexa24ph.com - generic viagra 100mg viagra online buy uk viagra sale auckland https://God.blue/forward.php?url=http://zithazi.com - buy zithromax viagra sale northern ireland
          

Mercy flights: Thousands of stranded Australians to fly home   

Cache   
Qantas and Virgin will restart scheduled flights to Los Angeles, Hong Kong, London and Auckland in a bid to assist Australians stuck overseas. Reported by The Age 5 days ago.
          

182. Intervista Francesco Petrilli   

Cache   

Francesco è di Reggio Emilia e ha lavorato otto anni per la Visa Global Logistics, un’azienda di logistica internazionale. L’azienda ha 66 filiali in tutto il modo, di cui tre in Nuova Zelanda. Un anno fa l’azienda gli ha proposto il trasferimento alla filiale di Auckland per sviluppare il mercato italiano ed europeo, e Francesco ha colto volentieri questa opportunità. L’azienda si occupa di spedizioni internazionali via aerea e via mare in containers. Dall’Italia si esportano merci di tutti generi, dai mobili ai macchinari, automobili, cibo, vini. Francesco ci parla di vari aspetti del suo lavoro e delle impressioni del suo primo anno in NZ, dove si trova bene sia col lavoro che coi colleghi e dove spera di rimanere almeno quattro anni.

Ondazzurra è in diretta ogni domenica alle 11.20 su 104.6 FM


          

ELGIN REAL ESTATE LIMITED   

Cache   

Notice of Appointment of Liquidator

The Companies Act 1993 (“Act”)

Stephen Young, of RSM New Zealand (Auckland), was appointed liquidator of the above company, pursuant to section 241(2)(a) of the Act, on 26 March 2020 at 8.21am. The directors of the company signed a solvency certificate prior to the liquidation.

Notice to Creditors to Prove Debts or Claims

Notice is given that the liquidator fixes 8 May 2020 as the day on or before which the creditors of the company are to make their claims and to establish any priority their claims may have, under section 312 of the Act, or to be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before the claims are made.

Notice of Intention to Remove

Application to remove the above-named company will be made to the Registrar, pursuant to section 318(1)(e) of the Act, on the grounds that the documents referred to in section 257(1)(a) of the Act will be sent to the Registrar on 11 May 2020. Objections to remove, under section 321 of the Act, must be delivered to the Registrar before that date.

Dated this 31st day of March 2020.

STEPHEN YOUNG, Liquidator.

The Address and Telephone Number to Which, During Normal Business Hours, Enquiries May Be Directed by a Creditor or Member: RSM New Zealand (Auckland), PO Box 204276, Highbrook, Auckland 2161. Telephone: (09) 271 4527.


          

KIKKI.K (NZ) PTY LIMITED (trading as Kikki.K) (in liquidation)   

Cache   

Notice of Appointment of Liquidators and
Notice to Creditors to Claim

Pursuant to Section 255(2)(a) and Liquidation Regulation 12 of the Companies Act 1993

Company Number: 1828076

Andrew McKay and Andrew Bethell, both chartered accountants and CA ANZ accredited insolvency practitioners of BDO Auckland, were appointed joint liquidators of the company by a special resolution of the shareholders on 24 March 2020 at 11.40am AEST.

Notice is hereby given that as liquidators of KIKKI.K (NZ) PTY LIMITED (in liquidation), we fix 30 April 2020 as the day on or before which the creditors of the company are to make their claims and to establish any priority their claims may have, under section 312 of the Companies Act 1993 (as amended), or to be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before the debts are claimed or, as the case may be, from objecting to the distribution.

Creditors and Shareholders May Direct Enquiries During Normal Business Hours to: Daniel Matene, BDO Auckland, Level 4, BDO Centre, 4 Graham Street (PO Box 2219), Auckland 1140. Telephone: (09) 379 2950. Email: bri.akl@bdo.co.nz.

Dated this 30th day of March 2020.

ANDREW McKAY, Liquidator


          

BPO LIMITED (in liquidation)   

Cache   

Notice of Appointment of Liquidators

Pursuant to Section 255(2)(a) of the Companies Act 1993 (“Act”)

Company No.: 959291

Steven Khov and Kieran Jones both CA ANZ accredited insolvency practitioners were appointed joint and several liquidators of the above-named company on 31 March 2020 at 3.00pm pursuant to section 241(2)(a) of the Act.

Notice to Creditors

We fix 1 May 2020 as the day on or before which the creditors of the company are to make their claims and to establish any priority, under section 312 of the Act, or to be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before the claims are proved or, as the case may be, from objecting to the distribution.

Please direct any enquiries to Steven Khov at steven@khovjones.co.nz or Kieran Jones at kieran@khovjones.co.nz.

Dated this 31st day of March 2020.

STEVEN KHOV and KIERAN JONES, Joint Liquidators.

Address for Liquidators: Khov Jones Limited, PO Box 302261, North Harbour, Auckland 0751.


          

NEW TRAVEL BROKERS LIMITED (in liquidation)   

Cache   

Notice of Appointment of Liquidator and
Notice to Creditors to Prove Debts or Claims

Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with section 241 of the Companies Act 1993, the shareholders of the above-named company, on 24 March 2020 at 11.00am, appointed Victoria Toon, chartered accountant of Auckland, as liquidator of the above-named company.

The undersigned does hereby fix 1 May 2020 as the day on or before which the creditors of the company are to prove their debts or claims and to establish any title they may have to priority, under section 312 of the Companies Act 1993, or to be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before the debts are proved or, as the case may be, from objecting to the distribution.

VICTORIA TOON, Liquidator.

Address: Corporate Restructuring Limited, Chartered Accountants, PO Box 10100, Dominion Road, Auckland 1446. Telephone: (09) 302 0759.

Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand Accredited Insolvency Practitioner (NZ)


          

BLOCK CD LIMITED, FRIGATE 42 LIMITED, PEDIMENT HOLDINGS LIMITED and SEAWARD PLACE LIMITED (all in liquidation)   

Cache   

Notice of Appointment of Liquidators

The above companies were placed into liquidation by special resolutions of shareholders dated 27 March 2020 at 9.00am, on the basis that the reasons for which the companies were incorporated have now passed. Gareth Russel Hoole and Clive Robert Bish, Chartered Accountants and CA ANZ Accredited Insolvency Practitioners (NZ) were appointed joint and several liquidators pursuant to section 241(2)(a) of the Companies Act 1993.

Notice to Creditors to Prove Debts or Claims

Notice is given that the liquidators fix 28 April 2020 as the day on or before which creditors of the company are to make their claims, and to establish any priority their claims may have, under section 312 of the Companies Act 1993, or to be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before their claims are made or, as the case may be, from objecting to any distribution.

Dated this 30th day of March 2020.

GARETH RUSSEL HOOLE and CLIVE ROBERT BISH, Liquidators.

The Address and Telephone Number to Which, During Normal Business Hours, Enquiries May be Directed by a Creditor or Member: Ecovis KGA Limited, Chartered Accountants, PO Box 37223 Parnell, Auckland 1151. Telephone: (09) 921 4630.


          

MA RISK SOLUTIONS NZ LIMITED (in liquidation)   

Cache   

Notice of Appointment of Liquidators and
Notice to Creditors to Prove Debts or Claims

Notice is hereby given that, subsequent to a resolution as to solvency and in accordance with section 241(2)(a) of the Companies Act 1993, the shareholders of the above-named company, on 30 March 2020 at 4.00pm, appointed Tony Leonard Maginness and Jared Waiata Booth, CA ANZ Accredited Insolvency Practitioners (NZ), of Auckland, jointly and severally as liquidators of the above-named company.

Notice is given that the liquidators fix 11 May 2020 as the day on or before which creditors of the company are to make their claims and to establish any priority their claims may have, under section 312 of the Companies Act 1993, or to be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made before their claims are made or, as the case may be, from objecting to any distribution.

Dated this 30th day of March 2020.

JARED BOOTH, Liquidator.

Note: This is a solvent liquidation.

Address of Liquidators: Baker Tilly Staple Rodway Auckland Limited, PO Box 3899, Auckland 1140. Email: kris.mcainsh@bakertillysr.nz. Telephone: (09) 309 0463.


          

DISPLAYMAKERS LIMITED (in liquidation)   

Cache   

Notice of Intention to Remove Company From the Register

Pursuant to Section 320 of the Companies Act 1993 (“Act”)

We, Jeffrey Philip Meltzer and Michael Lamacraft, liquidators of the above-named company whose registered office is situated Level 2, 5–7 Kingdon Street Auckland, hereby give notice that, pursuant to section 318(1)(e) of the Act and having filed with the Registrar our final report on the liquidation, it is intended to remove the company from the New Zealand Register.

Any objection to the removal, pursuant to section 321 of the Act, must be delivered to the Registrar of Companies no later than 30 April 2020.

Dated this 10th day of March 2020.

M. LAMACRAFT, Liquidator.

Contact Details: Meltzer Mason, Level 2, 5–7 Kingdon Street Auckland. Postal Address: PO Box 6302, Wellesley Street, Auckland 1141.


          

THE AUSSIE BUTCHER (WHANGAREI) LIMITED, LA VILLA LIMITED and STREETS AHEAD NUPAVE SYSTEMS LIMITED (all in liquidation)   

Cache   

Notice of Intention to Remove Companies From the Register

Company Nos.: 1285833, 6607937, 915702

I, Damien Grant, liquidator of the above-named companies, whose registered office is situated at Unit 1, 16 Piermark Drive, Rosedale, Auckland, hereby give notice that, pursuant to section 318(1)(e) of the Companies Act 1993 and having filed with the Registrar my final report on these liquidations, it is intended to remove the companies from the New Zealand Register.

Any objection to the removal, pursuant to section 321 of the Companies Act 1993, must be delivered to the Registrar of Companies no later than 20 April 2020.

Dated this 10th day of March 2020.

DAMIEN GRANT, Liquidator.

Address for Service: Waterstone Insolvency, PO Box 352, Auckland. Freephone: 0800 CLOSED. Website: www.waterstone.co.nz.


          

HARRIS ROAD PHARMACY LIMITED (in liquidation)   

Cache   

Notice of Intention to Remove Company From the Register

Pursuant to Section 320 of the Companies Act 1993 (“Act”)

We, Rachel Mason-Thomas and Karen Betty Mason, liquidators of the above-named company, whose registered office is situated at Level 2, 5–7 Kingdon Street, Newmarket, Auckland, hereby give notice that, pursuant to section 318(1)(e) of the Act and having filed with the Registrar our final report on the liquidation, it is intended to remove the company from the New Zealand Register.

Any objection to the removal, pursuant to section 321 of the Act, must be delivered to the Registrar of Companies no later than 24 April 2020.

Dated this 10th day of March 2020.

R. MASON-THOMAS, Liquidator, CA ANZ Accredited Insolvency Practitioner.

Contact Details: Meltzer Mason, Level 2, 5–7 Kingdon Street, Newmarket, Auckland 1052. Postal Address: PO Box 6302, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1141.


          

GOLDEN NECTAR LIMITED (in liquidation)   

Cache   

Notice of Intention to Remove Company From the Register

Pursuant to Section 320 of the Companies Act 1993 (“Act”)

We, Jeffrey Philip Meltzer and Michael Lamacraft, liquidators of the above-named company, whose registered office is situated at Level 2, 5–7 Kingdon Street, Newmarket, Auckland, hereby give notice that, pursuant to section 318(1)(e) of the Act and having filed with the Registrar our final report on the liquidation, it is intended to remove the company from the New Zealand Register.

Any objection to the removal, pursuant to section 321 of the Act, must be delivered to the Registrar of Companies no later than 30 April 2020.

Dated this 10th day of March 2020.

M. LAMACRAFT, Liquidator, CA ANZ Accredited Insolvency Practitioner.

Contact Details: Meltzer Mason, Level 2, 5–7 Kingdon Street, Newmarket, Auckland 1023. Postal Address: PO Box 6302, Wellesley Street, Auckland 1141.


          

A Volcano Monitoring Network has sensed Auckland's response to the Covid-19 lockdown   

Cache   
A Volcano Monitoring Network has sensed Auckland's response to the Covid-19 lockdown
          

Covid-19: Auckland Council puts external contracts on hold   

Cache   
Auckland Council is cutting all non-essential work to mitigate the financial impacts of Covid-19.
          

Sally Rippin: Billy B Brown turns 10   

Cache   
Beloved children's book character Billie B Brown is turning ten. And her award-winning Australian creator Sally Rippin is celebrating with three new books, illustrated by Aki Fukuoka, to add to the twenty already on kids' bookshelves. The Billie B Brown series has now sold over five million world-wide, translated into 14 languages. Sally tells Kathryn Ryan how she was due to come to Auckland for the Writers Festival, but because of lock-down, is pouring her talents into an on-line school holiday programme instead.
          

Political commentators Hooton & Mills   

Cache   
Matthew Hooton and Stephen Mills talk to Kathryn about the Government's lockdown exit strategy and look at what point the economic & social consequences become a health issues. Matthew Hooton is an Auckland based consultant and lobbyist. Stephen Mills is the executive director of UMR Research and former political adviser to two Labour governments.
          

Auckland Uni professor takes home 'Oscar' of the space sector   

Cache   
The first head of the Auckland Space Centre has won an award for demonstrating new technologies that could catch and reduce space debris. Guglielmo Aglietti joins Kathryn to talk about that research, and the work of the centre based at Auckland University.
          

Fincap wants brakes on payday lenders during Covid-19 lockdown   

Cache   
A nationwide budgeting service wants online payday lenders shuttered during the country's lockdown period amid concern people desperate for money will turn to loan sharks. An interest rate cap on high-cost lenders kicks in in June and will include a 100 % repayment limit. But some social agencies fear that people struggling to make ends meet will spiral into debt before then. Kathryn discusses with Fincap Chief Executive Tim Barnett , Emeline Afeaki-Mafile'o Executive Director of South Auckland based youth social agency, Affirming Works and Susan Taylor, Chief Executive of Financial Services Complaints Limited.
          

Political Commentators Hooton And Jones   

Cache   
Politics commentators Matthew Hooton and Neale Jones join Kathryn to discuss the government's economic response to Covid-19, how the Prime Minister's office is keeping a tight rein on the flow of information and the new committee to scrutinise the government's Covid response, which will be chaired by Simon Bridges. Matthew Hooton is an Auckland based consultant and lobbyist. Neale Jones was Chief of Staff to Labour Leader Jacinda Ardern, and prior to that was Chief of Staff to Andrew Little. He is the director of Capital Government Relations.
          

Lufthansa met vijf Boeing 747- en vijf Airbus A380-vluchten naar Nieuw-Zeeland   

Cache   

FRANKFURT - Lufthansa gaat in samenwerking met Fraport en de Duitse autoriteiten duizenden gestrande Europeanen terughalen uit Nieuw-Zeeland. De Duitse carrier zet deze week vijf A380’s en vijf 747’s in op speciale repatriëringsvluchten naar Auckland en Christchurch, de twee grootste steden van het land.


          

‘Hang’ In There: Bringing Art Home In A Time Of Crisis   

Cache   

Now that the vast majority of us are staying in to stay safe and do our bit for the collective health of the nation, the home has become even more of a sanctuary. Many of us also have more time on our hands, so it’s the opportune moment to design and redefine our immediate environment. Auckland’s Parnell Gallery has set up an online way for art lovers to ‘view’ a piece in their own home – perhaps for that new […]

The post ‘Hang’ In There: Bringing Art Home In A Time Of Crisis appeared first on Verve Magazine.


          

To queer or not to queer: What can galleries do to address homophobia?   

Cache   
There have been calls for major institutions like Auckland Art Gallery to do better in identifying queer or queer-associated artists. New Auckland Art Gallery…
          

Get the Best Web Development and Get Additional Clients    

Cache   

Looking for the Best Web Development Company NZ? Ultimate Web Designs Limited is a trusted company that of Affordable Web Design Packages that will meet your demands and special needs. The company is ready to help both small and medium businesses and ensures that it will get your business off the ground fulfilling all your needs. Being the most trustworthy and Best Web Development Company NZ  Ultimate Web Designs Limited will assign you a dedicated in-house designer who will work closely with you in order to make your desires come true. Your website will be coded based on your ideas and you will have a great chance to follow the entire process.

Offering Web Design & Development in Auckland this company will create very responsive packages so that your brand will be accessible on all devices. Everything will be handled according to the latest design standards to ensure your website is a lovely place for your customers. In order to deliver and create modern, stylish and easy to use web design the designers will make every effort and opt for the most effective methods. They will open up new opportunities for you and as a result you will gain more profits and earn additional clients all over the world. Putting your business on the web Ultimate Web Designs Limited will craft eye-catching solutions and your customers will just admire the online platform you offer them. Nowadays there are millions of websites but only modern and responsive ones become successful. The highly skilled and very professional website designers of Ultimate Web Designs Limited will help you succeed online within a very short timeframe.

A creative website of your company will develop your brand, increase leads and income. Ultimate Web Designs Limited has years of experience in the field of Web Design & Development in Auckland and it is able to successfully design, optimize and promote your website worldwide. Serving clients all over the world with Affordable Web Design Packages this company is proud to have customers having small personal websites to massive real estate firms or online stores. Due to the professionally and tastefully created solutions your website will become the center of people's attention and you will sit back and enjoy your increasing sales. Ultimate Web Designs Limited has the skills and the perfect knowledge to deal with its customers challenging ideas, so if you want to reach the top of search engines, then trust this firm now. Ultimate Web Designs Limited has already served thousands of companies and continues its business relationship with them. If you also want to deal with this company feel free to contact its customer service and get all the details. Ultimate Web Designs Limited will surely help your business grow leaving all your competitors behind. The goal of the company is to serve you in the best possible way so trust this professional team and you will never regret. You will get a very contemporary website in no time and enjoy the affordable rates as well as many sales and discounts!


          

Crews battle blaze on Mount Wellington   

Cache   
Six fire and emergency crews are battling a blaze on Auckland's Mount Wellington tonight.
          

Land Set Apart for Education Purposes—657 Te Pahu Road, Te Pahu   

Cache   

Pursuant to section 52 of the Public Works Act 1981, and to a delegation from the Minister for Land Information, I, Jonathan Wright, Land Information New Zealand, declares that the land described in the Schedule to this notice is to be set apart for education purposes and shall be vested in the Crown on the date of publication hereof in the New Zealand Gazette.

South Auckland Land District—Waipa District

Schedule

Land Set Apart for Education Purposes
Area
ha
Description
0.0809 Lot 1 DP 34703 being all the land contained in Record of Title SA892/114

Dated at Wellington this 7th day of April 2020.

JONATHAN WRIGHT, for the Minister for Land Information.

(LINZ CPC/2019/20911)


          

Land Declared No Longer Needed for Education Purposes   

Cache   

Pursuant to section 71B of the Education Act 1989, and pursuant to an authority delegated to me, I, Brian Mitchell, Group Manager – Infrastructure Advisory Services, Ministry of Education, Wellington, hereby give the following notice.

Notice

  1. The land described in the Schedule to this notice is No Longer Needed for Education Purposes.
  2. This notice shall come into force on 2 April 2020.

Schedule

Area
ha
Description
0.0085 Part Part Reserve 4251 and Section 25 Block I Hanmer Township being part of the land held in Record of Title 700553 Canterbury Land District (subject to survey)
0.1012 Section 6 Block IV Village of Mokau being part of the land held in S273381 (New Zealand Gazette 1963, page 1873) South Auckland Land District (subject to survey)

Dated at Wellington this 2nd day of April 2020.

BRIAN MITCHELL, Group Manager - Infrastructure Advisory Services, Ministry of Education, Wellington.


          

Auckland Airport to raise a total NZD 1.2bn   

Cache   
Auckland International Airport is preparing to limit the negative impact of the coronavirus pandemic by tapping investors for NZD 1.00 billion (USD 591.47 million) while planning a share purchase plan (SPP) worth NZD 200.00 million....
          

Phone lines run hot for welfare assistance - Auckland Council   

Cache   

Around 3000 requests for food parcels have been received by an Auckland Council call centre in the first week of its operation, says Auckland Mayor Phil Goff.


          

Tunnelling Bacteria: An Underestimated Threat to Wooden Structures   

Cache   

Our common perception of bacteria is that they are simple organisms capable of performing only small tasks for their survival and well-being. However, it is beginning to emerge that bacteria have evolved more sophisticated strategies and can ingeniously interact with their living hosts and effectively talk to their own kind within colonies.

Inline Image: 
Abstract: 
Bacteria that have evolved a clever way to feed by tunnelling within cell walls can thrive in pretreated wood in humid conditions, and may even have damaged new houses in Auckland.
Article Image: 
Article image Large: 

read more


          

'Whose bubble am I supposed to infect?': Auckland landlord tries to move in with tenants for lockdown    

Cache   

Police say his behaviour has been noted in case he attempts a lockdown breach again.
          

New cases fall to two-week low   

Cache   

The number of new Covid-19 cases reported on Tuesday was the lowest it has been in two weeks, Marc Daalder reports

There were just 54 new cases of Covid-19 in New Zealand as of Tuesday morning, Director-General of Health Ashley Bloomfield said.

This is the lowest figure in two weeks, since there were 50 new cases on March 24. This drop is a continuation of yesterday's pattern, which saw a significant slump in the number of new cases after a period in which cases stagnated at around 80 a day.

"We do appear, at this early stage, to be on track," Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said.

There are now 1160 cases in New Zealand, 241 of which have recovered. For the first time, there were more recoveries today than new cases. Another 12 patients are in hospital, four of whom are in intensive care. One of the patients in intensive care is in critical condition.

The proportion of cases linked to overseas travel continues to drop and is now down to 42 percent, with another 41 percent linked to other confirmed cases. Community transmission makes up just 2 percent of the total, with the remaining 15 percent still under investigation.

Of the day's new cases, over half were linked to extant clusters of the virus, which have continued to grow. Clusters are community spread where the patient zero is known and are not considered community transmission. The largest cluster, around Auckland's Marist College, is now at 77 cases while the next largest - connected to a wedding in Bluff - swelled by 11 cases to 73.

The news came as Health Minister David Clark found himself embroiled in a scandal of his own making. Clark told Ardern on Monday evening that he had violated the terms of the lockdown more than a week earlier when he drove his family 20 kilometres from his Dunedin home to the beach.

Ardern spent much of Tuesday afternoon's press conference battling questions over why Clark wasn't fired - she said it would disrupt the response to Covid-19 - and whether he would be sacked after the crisis abates. "Under different circumstances, he would have lost his job," she said, but she declined to say what his fate would be after the lockdown lifts.

Despite this, Ardern and Bloomfield tried to centre the discussion on three issues New Zealand needed to focus on in order to effectively combat Covid-19: contact tracing, social isolation (including obeying the lockdown) and border restrictions.

Officials, including Ardern and Bloomfield, have repeatedly emphasised in recent days that while the pattern of daily case numbers have stagnated and started to slump may be indicative of the lockdown working, this isn't a reason to quit complying early. The remaining weeks are required to ferret out any infections that have occurred during lockdown, and Ardern has made clear that the lockdown will not end early.

As Easter weekend approaches, Ardern and Bloomfield told Kiwis to stay home. "Have a staycation," Bloomfield said.

Enforcement of the lockdown is also proceeding apace, Bloomfield said, with 291 breaches of the rules, 16 prosecutions, 263 warnings delivered and 10 youth referrals.

Ardern acknowledged that the Government was considering a mandatory quarantine for New Zealanders returning to the country after lockdown, as pressure mounts for stricter measures at the border. "I think you've seen, from every decision we have made at the border, that we see it as an ongoing point of risk," she said.

"We want to make sure that we remove that risk as much as possible, that's why we've only continued to ramp up. Quite frankly, regardless of the enforcement, I really want a water-tight system at our border, and I think we can do better on that."

Newsroom first reported that epidemiologists were agitating for quarantine for all returnees in March. After the press conference, the National Party launched a petition for this quarantine policy to be implemented immediately. The petition will be presented to the Government on Wednesday, Simon Bridges said.

"New Zealanders are sacrificing a lot for this lockdown. Fathers have missed the births of their babies, funerals to farewell loved ones haven’t gone ahead and livelihoods have been destroyed. For this to have been worthwhile we need to ensure the virus has no further chance of spreading," Bridges said.

Ardern said the wage subsidy scheme has now paid out $6.6 billion in support of 1.1 million jobs.


          

Clark's career all but over after lockdown breaches   

Cache   

After a second revelation of a lockdown breach in as many weeks, David Clark's political career is on life support. But in truth he has never really seemed a good fit as health minister, Sam Sachdeva writes.

Appearing before Parliament’s epidemic response committee hours after his latest public shaming, Health Minister David Clark appeared suitably cowed.

In his appearance last week, Clark ran through a laundry list of the health system’s achievements. This time, his remarks were far briefer, and more personal.

“I have let New Zealanders down and I have apologised to the Prime Minister and I do apologise to the public.”

The subject of said apology? A 20-kilometre drive to a Dunedin beach with his family on the first weekend of lockdown, revealed by Clark on Tuesday morning after he last week faced heat for a shorter drive to a mountain-biking trail near his house.

There were some (this reporter included) who felt the reaction to Clark’s bike ride was disproportionate to the actual offence, ill-advised though it was.

Had that been an isolated incident it was possible, or even probable, that he would have been able to shake off the outrage and move ahead.

But the one-two punch of the cycle trip and the 20km family drive to the beach - a journey his wife reportedly questioned more thoroughly than he did - was a fatal combination.

Or at least it would have been in normal circumstances. Clark offered his resignation and Ardern indicated she would have accepted it, had it not been for the near-unprecedented situation the country finds itself in. 

“We cannot afford massive disruption in the health sector or to our response. For that reason, and that reason alone, Dr Clark will maintain his role.”

Some critics may accuse her of showing weakness, but it feels like the right decision.

There is no obvious successor able to immediately step in and steer the unwieldy national health system through the rocks ahead.

While ministry officials and healthcare workers are the people who actually make things happen, a health minister who understands their processes and is able to oversee their work with a political lens is still vital.

An uncomfortable fit

In truth, Clark has never seemed like a comfortable fit in the health portfolio since he replaced the departing Annette King (how Ardern must rue the decision of the experienced and formidable King to pull up stumps in opposition, while noting the irony it was her replacement of King as Labour’s deputy leader that accelerated her retirement plans).

He came into the job with no real health experience to speak of; while his mother was a GP, the ‘Dr’ honorific in front of his name comes from a PhD in theology rather than any medical qualifications.

Clark has exercised questionable judgment in the past too, most notably a decision to head overseas for a family holiday in the days before a nationwide nurses’ strike in mid-2018.

More generally, he has never seemed entirely comfortable fielding difficult questions from opposition MPs or the media, frequently giving the impression of a deer in the headlights.

From the outset, it seemed odd that Clark had not based himself in Wellington for the duration of the lockdown. For all that technology can offer, there is a reason why Ardern chose not to return to Auckland: “To be as close as I can for those who are helping to run the operation from central government over the coming weeks,” she said at the press conference announcing the lockdown.

Of course, Clark’s young family may have been a factor in his decision to stay south, but it nonetheless does not speak volumes of Ardern’s confidence in him that she was happy with that arrangement.

His failures in the last month have not been specific to health, but a broader inability to understand how his personal indulgences would be perceived by a public being asked to sacrifice more than they ever have in their lifetimes.

The former Treasury analyst was far more comfortable in his associate finance role - a portfolio he has now been stripped of by Ardern, deciding to take away what she could while pushing him to the bottom of the Cabinet rankings.

Barring a miracle, his political career is as good as over. We do not know for sure whether this year’s election will still take place on September 19, but it would not be a shock were he to bow out then (indeed, he could not offer Newshub an answer when asked about the odds of a retirement).

In one sense, that is a shame: had he been given a role more suited to his strengths, such as economic development or trade, he may well have shown talent.

Then again, his failures in the last month have not been specific to health, but a broader inability to understand how his personal indulgences would be perceived by a public being asked to sacrifice more than they ever have in their lifetimes.

If and when Clark does go, finding a replacement able to shore up a health system which has faced immense strain and either held firm or failed will not be easy.

But Ardern is still focused on the here and now - and no matter how devastated he may feel at present, so too must Clark.


          

Coromandel could face isolation roadblocks   

Cache   

This story first appeared in The Mercury Bay Informer and is republished here with permission.

Roadblocks could be in place at entry points to the Coromandel this week as the local Civil Defence Controller moves to prevent unlawful travel to the Peninsula during the Covid-19 lockdown.

Speaking to The Informer last Sunday, Garry Towler said he was compiling evidence to present to the National Response Centre in Wellington as part of a formal request for State Highways 25 and 25A to be managed. This would likely see access onto the Coromandel restricted to emergency vehicles and essential workers.

Towler said this was the only way to curb what he described as selfish and gormless people flouting the rules in order to travel to holiday homes on the Peninsula. “What exactly such access restrictions will look like and the extent of it, I’m not sure, those decisions will be made by others, but I will be making it clear that that is what we require,” he said.

Thames-Coromandel District Council has been inundated with complaints about non-residents arriving at baches, frequently under the cover of darkness. Even a public appeal from Mayor Sandra Goudie appears to be falling on deaf ears. “The message is clear - stay home and save lives,” she cautioned. “Home is not your second holiday home, it’s your permanent place of residence. The capacity of our medical and other essential services is not the same as the larger centres. If we get a cluster of sick people outside of our usual permanent population, our medical facilities will struggle.”

Coromandel civil defence controller Garry Towler. Photo: Supplied

Despite the warnings, communities including Cooks Beach and Matarangi have continued to report large numbers of non-residents arriving throughout the course of last week. As well as potentially transferring the Covid-19 virus from one region to another, those breaking the lockdown bans are diverting essential and emergency workers away from helping the most vulnerable.

“I have a team here who are working hard on getting food and water out to assist the needy,” Towler said. “Then instead of focusing on that, I have to put together what is basically a firefighting team to deal with this issue of people who are not obeying the rules and staying at home. Every day I have a flood of emails from Coromandel residents who have woken up and suddenly people have moved in next door. These are people who have everything they need at their homes in Hamilton or Auckland, or wherever they are from, and they have just decided to come and have a holiday on the Peninsula.

“You look at our small communities like Hot Water Beach where they have been doing a great job, sticking to the rules and looking after one another. Then suddenly all these people arrive in the middle of the lockdown, breaking the local community’s isolation and wandering around the shop so others no longer feel it is safe to go in there. It’s been pretty widespread from Pauanui right up to the north of the Mercury Bay area, it’s just ridiculous.”

Around 30 people are currently working as part of the Thames-Valley Emergency Response Area team, which is run jointly by Thames-Coromandel, Hauraki and Matamata-Piako District Councils. These include around 10 working at the Emergency Operations Centre in Thames, between eight and 10 distributing food and another 10 working remotely. The team has the ability to call on further staff if required.

Towler said his and his team’s primary focus is on people's welfare and ensuring residents across the three districts were able to self-isolate safely in their homes for the duration of the lockdown. Over the course of last week, demand for help doubled every day with a minimum of 100 food parcels being distributed daily. “Each pack contains food and essentials to sustain the recipient household for four days, Towler said. “Initially we were helping mostly our beneficiaries and those on very limited incomes. That trend has changed and we are now hearing from more wage earners as well as small business-owners who are running out of whatever income they had, so the situation is escalating.”

Going forward, Towler said he was concerned about the level of tension that the reckless behaviour of some was causing within communities and even between neighbours. “This bad feeling won’t just go away quickly,” he said. “And I understand it, people are afraid, most are doing everything they can to stop this thing spreading and others are just being selfish and irresponsible.”

Acknowledging that denying people access to the Coromandel Peninsula was a serious move, Towler said the scale of the problem left him with little option. “If you are asking for the police or the Defence Force to come in to man our roads, you need to be able to make a very good case for that to happen, but I believe we have the evidence to prove that it is necessary,” he said.

This story first appeared in The Mercury Bay Informer and is republished here with permission.


          

Business Wrap: Huge Airport deal   

Cache   

Auckland Airport launches a $1.2b capital raising, but Auckland Council pulls out; Marsden Point cuts production again as Covid-19 hits fuel demand; Kiwi Property cancels dividend too

Down day: The NZ sharemarket lost ground yesterday following the announcement of a second major capital raising in as many days and the prospect of more to come left investors on edge. The NZX50 closed down 1.7 percent at 9764, while across the Tasman the ASX200 finished the day strongly and near its highs for the session gaining 4.3 percent to close at 5287.

Shoring Up: Last week it was Kathmandu. This week it was Auckland International Airport wanting investors to stump up more money as part of a major capital raising. Seeking $1.2 billion, including a $1b fully underwritten institutional placement and a $200 million share purchase plan at $4.50 per share, a 10.7 percent discount to last Friday’s closing price, retail investors face a dilemma.

Shall I go or should I stay now? Buy in now to the capital raise or wait for the shares to become cheaper if markets are still to bottom out and the borders remain closed for longer than anticipated.

Halted: Auckland Airport shares were halted for the placement through a bookbuild from institutional investors. Existing shareholders in New Zealand can subscribe for up to $50,000 of new Auckland Airport shares . The price is expected to be announced on Thursday when shares resumed trading.

Count us out: Analysts and fund Managers spoken to by Newsroom believe the capital raise will be well supported by cashed-up institutional investors seeking yield, though Auckland Airport’s major shareholder, Auckland Council says it won’t be participating. Mayor Phil Goff told Newsroom the Council has “…other more important spending priorities facing the city right now.”

Watered down: This will mean the Council’s current 22 percent holding is likely be diluted to around 18 percent.

Go slow: Refining NZ is to extend its reduced production mode by a further two months to the end of August because of COVID-19 travel and transport restrictions hitting demand for fuel. The owner of the Marsden Point refinery said it expected further production reductions in response to the reduced demand for transport fuels. Refining NZ shares closed down 3.5 percent at 84c.

Another one: Kiwi Property Group is the latest company to announce that it is cancelling its dividend. The news will be a disappointment for retirees and others on fixed incomes who have sought out the property investment company for its reliable earnings and conservative gearing. Cash is king: The company said that was cutting costs and had put all non-essential capital expenditure projects on hold.

Affordable pay cuts: The Board of Directors, Chief Executive Officer and Executive Team have all agreed to a 20 percent reduction in pay, while in parallel, employee salary increases have also been frozen. Kiwi Property Group shares closed down 7.2 percent at 83.5c

Shareholder revolt: Retail investors in Hong Kong have threatened legal action against HSBC and will attempt to force the bank to hold an extraordinary general meeting, after it was pressured by UK regulators to cancel its dividend due to the coronavirus crisis.

First time: It’s the first time in 75 years the iconic Hong Kong institution will not pay a dividend which will cause additional financial stress for many low-income workers in particular who rely on the dividend.

United we stand: Individual HSBC shareholders banded together to try to get the 5 percent of outstanding shares required to secure an EGM.

Decimated: Flight Centre announced it would permanently shut 428 stores in Australia and New Zealand by the end of July to slash costs, while also raising $900 million in fresh equity and debt to get it through the coronavirus pandemic. The ASX-listed travel group yesterday announced a $700 million equity capital raising, consisting of a $282 million placement to institutional investors and a $419 million 1-for-1.75 entitlement offer to existing shareholders, both at $7.20 a share: a 27 percent discount to the last closing price on 19 March.

Crash landing: Flight Centre shares bottomed out at the end of GFC in March 2009 at $3.74, reached an all-time high of $67.49 in July 2018, and were still trading at $44 as recently as January this year before the coronavirus outbreak led to a dramatic fall in international flights and its share price.

More stimulus: Singapore is to undertake a third round of economic stimulus with another $5.1 billion Singapore dollars ($NZ6 billion) being allocated to soften the economic damage from the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. In total, Singapore has set aside $60 billion Singapore dollars ($NZ70.6 billion), accounting for around 12 percent of the country’s GDP.

Cash for all: The measures include increased wage subsidies for all companies in April, waivers on rental and foreign worker levies for businesses and a cash pay-out of $600 Singapore dollars ($NZ706) each for all adult Singaporeans

Weird conspiracy: Several mobile phone towers in the U.K. have been set on fire and engineers harassed amid the spread of online conspiracy theories that link 5G technology with the coronavirus pandemic. Video footage circulated online last week showing a mast torched in the English city of Birmingham. Meanwhile, a clip also surfaced on Twitter showing a woman harassing telecoms engineers laying 5G fibre-optic cables claiming the technology “kills people.”

5G falsely blamed There are floods of posts on Facebook claiming the coronavirus outbreak was caused by 5G, the fifth generation of mobile internet. Many of the claims centre on the idea that the virus originated in Wuhan because the Chinese city had deployed 5G networks last year...

Facebook. That is all you need to know about that story (eds comment)


          

Hard drugs and hard times under lockdown   

Cache   

Addiction and withdrawal don’t just go away during a lockdown, writes Bonnie Sumner, which is why health services and support agencies are doing all they can to make sure no one suffers.

It’s happening outside alcohol shops, in supermarket carparks and, sometimes, on quiet back streets between people riding bicycles.

Despite the lockdown, drug suppliers are still finding ways to get illicit substances to their customers, even if it means stretching the essential travel definition and mingling bubbles.

Almost two weeks in and it’s pretty much business as usual. But those with insider knowledge of the trade say it won’t stay this way for long.

“There will be a strangulation point when there’s not enough drugs, but we haven’t reached that point yet,” says a source with intimate knowledge of the drug economy. “There is tons of it here already being held by the distributors. But of course the borders are closed, so it’s sixth form economics, supply and demand – what we’re going to see is them choke the supply and then put the price way up.” 

Early days, but harm reduction services like the NZ Drug Foundation are concerned that restricted access could result in unpredictable and worrying outcomes.

“We’re anticipating that with less travel across the country, a lot of the supply distribution chains that are there will mean that there’s less trafficking that can occur across the country, which in some ways could be a good thing,” says Ben Birks Ang, deputy executive director of programmes. 

“But also if someone is dependant and they’re still doing what they can to access drugs, we’re a little bit concerned that that will result in more homemade drugs, or substituting for other drugs that are more available but could be potentially riskier for them.”

The Drug Foundation has teamed up with a number of other services in the sector to present a set of harm-reduction messages to people living with drug and alcohol addiction to encourage them to do everything they can to avoid overdosing at a time of increased risk.

“Some of the advice that we’ve been giving is if you can, reduce your use, or take a break from it, but recognising that for some people that could actually create much more negative impact for their households than maintaining a lower level of use or maintaining their use,” says Birks Ang.

“Also, if they are going to access things, [we’re saying] do it as safely as possible, and making sure they’re using less of it so that if it is a substitute substance, or a lower quality, or it’s got something else in it, there’s less chance that that can result in an overdose or health issues.” 

Similarly, anyone who does reduce or even eliminate their drug use should be careful about starting to use again, he says. Avoiding overdose cases taking up precious hospital space during the pandemic is one of the key concerns.

“If people have had a break from substances and they have been using it before, their tolerance level would have been higher while using it because their body would have got used to that drug. Taking a break, their tolerance decreases because their body readjusts itself to a new normal. As they then access the same amount of alcohol or drugs they used to while they were using regularly, they are at higher risk of having an unpredictable or unpleasant experience and increase their chance of overdose as well.” 

Other moves include the fast-tracking of intranasal naloxone, a drug that reverses the impact of an opioid overdose, for frontline services in March. Naloxone is carried by Ministry of Health-funded emergency ambulance services, and opioid substitution treatment services are exploring further ways to help opioid users access it. 

The Ministry of Health has ensured that alcohol and other drug treatment services – as with other mental health and addiction services – are identified as essential services during lockdown. However, while there is an expectation that services are available for those who need them, the Ministry says it is aware that dedicated medical management withdrawal services have either closed or are considering closing, to ensure staff and the facility can be used more flexibly to respond to Covid-19. 

The Ministry recommends a reconfiguration of the delivery of a service (that is, providing it through a different pathway), rather than removing a treatment option altogether. 

“DHBs must ensure that there is a clearly defined and communicated care pathway for people who are experiencing withdrawal to access help,” says Robyn Shearer, Deputy Director-General, Mental Health and Addiction. “If the local expectation is that people are managed in primary or community care, DHBs should ensure that those services have information on withdrawal management.

Back at the coalface, encouraging drug users to have another person around who isn’t using but who knows what they’ve taken, is part of the message the Drug Foundation is trying to get across, and it has also been trying to educate the drug using community about common withdrawal symptoms and which ones to take more seriously.

“We also ask whānau and friends to keep an eye out for withdrawal symptoms, which can range from difficulty in sleeping, confusion and disorientation,” says Birks Ang. “This may be the perfect time to sit down with your loved ones and talk to them about how they might be able to cope without drug use.”

When it comes to harder drugs, there is also the matter of availability at the supply end – generally countries with their own lockdowns and restrictions on movement. As our source explains: "There’s stuff coming down through the Pacific … It all comes from China and Mexico and it comes in through the Pacific.” 

Police say they haven’t detected any drop-off in supply yet, but are closely monitoring drug supply lines during the lockdown, according to Detective Inspector Blair Macdonald, manager for the National Drug Intelligence Bureau.

“At this time we have not seen any significant impact on the availability or price of illicit substances. However, it is too soon to draw any definitive conclusions into what impact the level 4 restriction period will have on drug use and supply trends.” 

Police are working with the Drug Foundation to understand how Covid-19 might be affecting drug users and addicts. “We echo their advice to regular consumers of drugs to consider taking a break, as the effects of drug use on users and those around them are different whilst the nation remains at home during the level 4 restriction period.”

Of course, anyone desperate for a fix will be tempted to travel – with an increased risk of being arrested – and the Foundation is keen to get that message across too. 

“If they leave their bubble or their house to get something, even if it’s left outside somebody else’s property so they’re technically not merging bubbles, there are more police around who will be asking people what’s happening so there’s a greater chance they will come into contact with a police officer while in possession of substances. So think carefully about whether the increased risk is worth it.”

The police are clearly concerned about the potential spread of Covid-19 through drug dealing. “People also need to consider that face-to-face contact with people supplying drugs, handling cash and close contact with those outside of your bubble all have the potential to transmit Covid-19,” says Macdonald. “There are no safety controls in place within the supply and retail chain of illicit drug distribution.” 

As Women’s Refuge chief executive Ang Jury made clear recently, the situation is having a noticeable effect on domestic violence, with refuges seeing up to a 60 percent increase in requests for help since the lockdown. 

“The lockdown can be stressful anyway,” says Birks Ang. “And I think if someone is trying to withdraw, whether it’s by choice or not, that’s a very uncomfortable situation. Their emotions can be all over the place and their ability to suppress or control their actions can be more challenging, so they might be more impulsive, they might have stronger feelings that are more difficult for them to contain.”

Drug harm reduction frontline workers are having to figure out new ways to communicate with their clients. An Auckland Alcohol and Other Drugs clinician/counsellor whose clients live in residential facilities for those in recovery, and who spoke to Newsroom anonymously, says they are busier than ever. 

“It’s so new for everybody, we’re taking each day as it comes. It takes a while to create a safe routine for everybody, because everybody processes grief, fear and anxiety differently. So we’ve created a normal routine, we have a staff meeting via Zoom in the morning, then it’s groups online via Zoom, and also one-on-one work. Then all their meetings they’d normally go to are all via Zoom. But we keep things the same as much as possible.”

Gill Hood, chief executive of Care NZ Manaaki Aotearoa, an addiction treatment and recovery service, says they have been successful at reaching out to people. “We quickly mobilised to ensure frontline had laptop and headset. Telephone counselling, and potentially online counselling through Zoom, happened fairly quickly.”

AA and NA (Narcotics Anonymous) meetings nationwide have also moved to Zoom, but Hood says some clients don’t have internet access, so phone counselling is the way to go. “We make sure people aren't disadvantaged if they don’t have data, find ways around that.”

In the meantime, everyone is watching for new and emerging trends in drug use over the lockdown period.

“We’re not sure what substitutions might happen,” says Birks Ang, “but we have a regular network of organisations who are monitoring the trends in their local communities so that we can nationally gather info about what it is that we’re likely to experience and can respond quicker around it. 

“One thing we’re thinking about is as people get a bit more blasé around the lockdown they’ll start taking more risks in coming weeks compared to what they did in the first week of lockdown, and we’re keeping an eye on what that looks like.”

Hood says now is a good time to connect or reconnect with supportive harm reduction services. “Alcohol and drug services are open and taking referrals for whatever level of support you require. People wanting to access NA or AA, they can do so online. Stay in contact with people who can support you and access the services - they’re open and running.”

Birks Ang agrees: “Drug and alcohol services are considered an essential service, so they’re still operating and providing support. A lot of the community-based counselling that’s available is going online so calling people through phones, through internet. Services like needle exchange are still operating as well, just on some reduced hours. So there’s still good harm reduction services that are available, and are actually more important right now because that’s about hygiene, not just of blood-borne infections.”

Alcohol and Drug helplines are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week free from landline or mobile. Call: 0800 787 797 or Text: 8681


          

The Listener dies and our light goes out   

Cache   

The closing of the Listener is not just the end of continuity, it is the silencing of all the voices to come, writes historian Dr Joanne Drayton

The New Zealand Listener is our central consciousness. The magazine grew up with us as we matured as a nation. Its story is our story. In the quiet way that intelligent things make themselves essential, it embedded itself in our thought processes and our way of being until the two became inseparable.

The closure of the Listener, announced on  April 2, 2020, is so much more than just the loss of a weekly journal, it is a lobotomising of who we are and how we see ourselves. The absence of the Listener from our shelves, our coffee tables, doctors’ surgeries, waiting rooms—from the multitude of places it inhabits in New Zealand—is tantamount to an extinguishing of self. For its multitude of readers, no amount of tears will offer consolation, and nothing will fill the gap. We have lost a taonga.

Shock, numbness, disbelief … it is almost impossible to comprehend that an institution so central to New Zealand’s core could be so abruptly discarded. “I just can’t imagine life without the Listener,” a friend told me, when she rang searching for some consolation. “I read the Listener cover to cover every week: it’s part of who we are” was one of the comments on my Facebook page.

In a world consumed by the myopic urgency of Covid-19, it is hard to see the long picture of the Listener, in either direction—past or future. When bodies and businesses are piling up, and plague is humanity’s bedfellow once more, it is hard to put this ‘one more’ death in perspective. We may even have become desensitised to loss, which has become synonymous with change: our ‘new normal’.

If we face our history, as Māori urge us to do, and look to our ancestors then the Listener stands before us as a Rangatira: noble, esteemed, but also sly and stealthy enough to have survived eight decades of weekly battle.

Ironically, its DNA belongs not in New Zealand, but in Britain. The magazine began as the print arm of radio, a new form of mass communication that was sweeping the world. The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), first took to the airwaves in 1922. The British Listener was established by the BBC, with the express intention of being a medium for the publication of broadcast programmes “by way of amplification and explanation”. Implicit in its title was the primacy of sound. The Listener magazine became an important platform previewing significant literary and musical programmes, reviewing new books and reflecting editorially on turbulent times. The first edition of this weekly magazine appeared just nine months before the Wall Street crash in October 1929.

The British Listener’s salient commentary shaped attitudes and expanded minds. Among its early contributors were some of the greatest writers of the century, including Virginia Woolf, George Bernard Shaw, T. S. Eliot, George Orwell, Aldous Huxley and Bertrand Russell. The magazine introduced new poets such as W. H. Auden and Sylvia Plath, and offered columnists a regular opportunity to have their say. It told illustrated stories and satirised key events in cartoons. The British Listener’s influence on culture was profound. The magazine was both voice and listener, shaping and being modelled by its world.

The Listener began in New Zealand a decade later, in 1939—yet another ominous year. New Zealand was on the cusp of its centenary celebrations; the world on the cusp of World War II. This dramatic timing added a desperate poignancy to its war coverage and political commentary. The New Zealand Listener was initially tied firmly to its flagship, Britain. But even then, there was a determination to explore what made Kiwis different from the rest of the world. There is a searching through its pages for the common threads that linked us together in a shared sense of nationhood. Greater even than this was the magazine’s mission to get under the skin of the average New Zealander and make itself essential.

The magazine provided readers with weekly radio programming. This was a precious commodity when radio was all powerful and at its peak. But other jewels added lustre to its columns.

From its inception, one of the Listener’s main focuses was the arts. The magazine published works by leading literary and cultural figures such as Janet Frame, James K. Baxter, Maurice Shadbolt, Michael King, Joy Cowley, Barry Crump, Billy T. James and A. K. Grant.

The Listener also gave voice to some of our finest journalists and commentators, such as Tom Scott, Rosemary McLeod, Arthur Baysting, Bruce Wallace, Jill McCracken, Tony Reid, Karen Jackman, Geoff Chapple, Steve Braunias, Clare de Lore and Diana Wichtel … to mention just a few.

And a string of the country’s most fearless and insightful editors, including Oliver Duff, Monte Holcroft, Alexander MacLeod, Ian Cross, Tony Reid, Terry Snow, Finlay Macdonald and Pamela Stirling.

The Listener changed with the times, constantly shape-shifting. “Whatever the ethos of the age, you’d catch it in the Listener,” writes Listener journalist Denis Welch in The Listener Bedside Book, No.3: “crimped and confined in the 40s; polite and uptight in the 50s; poppy and garish in the late 60s; nationalistic and naively political in the 70s; big-spending and bullish in the 80s.” The Listener was of its world, but also apart from it, “like some medieval monastery, it has virtually been all that kept the flame of enlightenment burning as barbarians massed in the gathering dark”.

For a tribe of New Zealanders, the Listener kept the faith alive in uncertain times.

“Cheeky, chatty, direct”, as Welch describes it … the Listener teased out issues that were close to New Zealanders’ hearts such as the curly problem of the Kiwi cringe, national identity, and in the Ask Aunt Daisy column the tricky problem of how to cook a hedgehog, cure a dog skin (complete with hair) and what to do with your oversupply of passionfruit.

The magazine has seen the introduction of television and the arrival of the internet. The Listener was there with us pictorially, with its consistently brilliant photography, and in words when we were grief-stricken over the Tangiwai, Wahine and Erebus disasters. It was a light of hope and rational thinking through the Pike River mine disaster, the Christchurch earthquakes, the horror of the Mosque mass shooting and deadly eruption of Te Puia o Whakaari. It was there for us and with us when we celebrated our America’s Cup and Rugby World Cup wins and our Olympic and Commonwealth sporting victories.

The Listener’s scope ranged from major investigative pieces to cartoons and crosswords. It was first an official organ of state radio; then, according to former editor Finlay Macdonald, underwent a “metamorphosis into an organ of public-service journalism, [then] to a separation from the state and eventual sale to a global media corporation” (The Listener Bedside Book, No.2).

The Listener has been our health and well-being adviser, our travelling companion, commenting, guiding and programming our leisure time for over 80 years. It contains the dreams and disasters of a young nation struggling to find itself in a period of unprecedented change. The Listener published the tragic and the trivial, and in so doing became a unique and remarkable mirror of the society it was reflecting.

Turning now to face our future: what can we see but absence? The death of the Listener is not just Covid-collateral damage; it is the extinguishing of a light in New Zealand. A light that has guided, cheered and chided this country through its best and worst moments.

The future is not just the end of continuity, it is the silencing of all the voices to come. The announcement of Bauer Media’s shutting down of the Listener, and a raft of other significant magazine titles, including the New Zealand Woman’s Weekly, should have come a day earlier—on April Fool’s Day.

Then we would have known for sure it was a joke. Instead, it was the following day and deadly serious, and we New Zealanders are the real fools. Fools for handing our iconic magazine titles over to a global media corporation; fools for believing the market place was the only true measure of their worth.

Dr Joanne Drayton is a Honorary Research Associate at the University of Auckland and was recipient of a 2019 Copyright Licensing New Zealand/New Zealand Society of Authors Stout Residency research grant to spend six weeks working on her history of the New Zealand Listener at the Stout Research Centre for New Zealand Studies at Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington.


          

Border quarantine mulled to quell virus   

Cache   

Strict border controls are being considered to prevent a second wave of Covid-19 cases. David Williams and Dileepa Fonseka report.

On March 23, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern gave the country 48 hours’ notice of a four-week lockdown designed to stop Covid-19. She warned without such drastic measures the country’s health system would be overwhelmed and thousands would die.

“The Government will do all it can to protect you,” Ardern said back then, when the country had 102 coronavirus cases. “Now I’m asking you to do everything you can to protect all of us. Kiwis – go home.”

As the lockdown approaches the two-week mark, with 1106 confirmed or probable cases, the Government is considering putting all overseas arrivals into quarantine – effectively their own lockdown – to protect the wider public from the most obvious source of re-infection.

Asked by Newsroom yesterday if the Government is considering a mandatory quarantine at the border, post-lockdown, Director-General of Health Ashley Bloomfield confirms that’s the case, especially to help authorities’ objective is to stamp out the virus.

“One of the things we will be actively looking at is, what's the posture we need at the border to keep us safe and to stop that growth in imported cases and then potential further transmission.”

Bloomfield says he hasn’t seen any arguments against such a quarantine “at this point”. “But, of course, there is a lot of work to do in how you actually stand up that arrangement. And at the moment it also will depend on who is able to come through the border and for what purposes.”

Right now, the only people allowed back into the country – apart from the occasional, essential exception – are Kiwi citizens and residents. But Bloomfield says 22,000 Kiwi citizens and residents have registered with the Government’s SafeTravel website.

“We’re assuming those are people who are overseas and at some point may wish to come back because they’re just visiting overseas, they’re not there long-term. Whatever happens at the border we’ll need to make sure it is very carefully managed and controlled so that we don’t see an increased risk from imported cases.”

In February, New Zealanders flown back from Wuhan, China – then the global epicentre of the outbreak – were quarantined at a defence force training base at Whangapāroa, in north Auckland. The Government has said since it was considering what to do about the risk from returning Kiwis, but has shied away from implementing a mandatory quarantine.

Ardern has said there were limitations to how many people could be safely quarantined in a facility. But since then the number of people arriving from overseas has dwindled. Airways, which controls the country’s air traffic, says there would normally be 703 international flight arrivals in March, but in the previous week just 50 international passenger flights had arrived.

Also, a big increase in testing is yet to reveal widespread community transmission of Covid-19 – so it’s hard to argue the relatively light, trust-based monitoring regime has failed, especially as Google’s mobile phone location data show a massive drop in visits to shops, supermarkets, parks and beaches.

“Obviously the border is our first line of defence against more imported cases.” – Ayesha Verrall

David Murdoch, an expert in infectious diseases and dean of the University of Otago, Christchurch, says increased testing for the virus around the country hasn’t led to a big increase in confirmed cases. “Which is really good – indicating that if there is some hidden, ongoing transmission it’s probably not huge and at least been contained at the moment.”

(University of Auckland Professor Shaun Hendy, of Te Pūnaha Matatini, a centre complex systems research and data analytics, is encouraged by the trend in confirmed cases. “While they’re plateauing, or even starting to decrease, it shows that the lockdown is working. I think we can take some confidence that what we’re doing is actually working at the moment.” He says there should be more certainty in a week or so.)

Murdoch says the country’s border controls will be critical to the next step – stopping a second wave of cases. That’s especially important as other countries haven’t limited the virus’s spread as well as we have. Without a vaccine, New Zealand remains vulnerable to re-infection, he says. “The border restrictions will be a major feature, I would think, of any de-escalation [from a national lockdown].”

The country opening up to international travel will be gradual, he thinks, starting with some countries before others. “It’s going to require a lot of careful thought.”

Infectious diseases specialist Ayesha Verrall, a senior lecturer at the Otago Medical School in Wellington, says the risk from returning New Zealanders will have to be managed “for the foreseeable future”. “Obviously the border is our first line of defence against more imported cases.”

She thinks a simple quarantine arrangement for returnees is preferable to a risk-based approach. In the early days of the outbreak, the Government had to regularly revise its recommendations about high-risk countries. “There doesn’t seem to be a place on earth that we could say is really unaffected.”

The Government could also choose to have all international flights arrive at one airport, like Auckland, for ease of access to quarantine facilities and employing staff.

Don’t forget the needs of those in quarantine

It’s not clear how such a quarantine facility would be configured – although there’s previous experience at Whangapāroa.

Technically speaking, Verrall says quarantine could happen at home – but she thinks Bloomfield means people being sent to a quarantine facility at the point of arrival. “I think that’s showing he recognises that we want to finish the lockdown in a better place, so we don’t want to undo the benefit of the lockdown by then having more imported cases.”

(The Ministry of Health couldn’t raise Bloomfield last night, to ask if home quarantine was part of this thinking.)

What’s also important, Verrall says, is to consider the needs of those being quarantined.

“They have welfare need that we shouldn’t ignore – and I don’t just mean feeding them, but also to feel connected and part of the community. We could send them something to read or some magazines or something.”

The benefit to all of those already inside the borders, of course, is a lower of the alert level, with fewer restrictions.

According to the Government’s official Covid-19 website, alert level three measures, which can apply locally or nationally, include: Limited travel in and out of areas with Covid-19 clusters or community transmission; the closure of affected educational facilities; mass gatherings cancelled and public venues closed; and the closure of “some” non-essential businesses.

Kirk Hope, the chief executive of lobby group BusinessNZ, says: “We’d support any steps that the Government feels that it needs to take in that regard to ensure that we can move back through the alert levels as quickly as possible and get some sort of functioning economy operating.

“Yes it would be tough and challenging for the people who needed to be quarantined but that is preferable to hundreds and thousands if not a couple of million people not working and the subsequent impact that has on the economy, frankly.”

Verrall, of Otago Medical School says if the country puts its effort “up front” by taking measures at the border, and the public health system stamps out cases and small clusters of cases in the community, then the public should be able to enjoy “a normal life”.

She quickly corrects herself: “Or get used to a new normal life, I guess I should say.”


Next Page: 25

© Googlier LLC, 2020